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Here is how you can implement view model for nested components I'll demo the same by displaying a user control in Tab 2 via MVVM so let's start by defining a view model class public class Tab2ViewModel : ViewModelBase { public Tab2ViewModel() { TabCommand = new SimpleCommand(OnTabCommand); } public ICommand TabCommand { get; ...


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Using FlowDocumentPageViewer will help the performance since it loads document asynchronously.


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Not quite sure if I understand you correctly. I imagine you might want to be able to change the ImageSource once and have both images updated automatically, instead of setting the Source for each picture at every change explicitly. That would be the description of a Binding. Here's an implementation of that case: ViewModel: using System; using ...


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I assumed your class' public properties and the binding match (Info class has all those properties mentioned in binding statements). Then you can try using IEnumerable<Info> or List<Info> for the ItemsSource : ..... IEnumerable<Info> information = doc.Root .Elements("CURRENCY") ...


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You set the background of the button but then you override the Template so the Button.Background never shows. You should get rid of Button.Background and then name the StackPanel in the Template so that you can change the background in the Trigger. <Button Style="{StaticResource {x:Static ToolBar.ButtonStyleKey}}" Content="" HorizontalAlignment="Right" ...


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I fixed it by doing the following: <ComboBox ItemsSource="{Binding ElementName=myItemsControl, Path=SelectedItem.ContactGroupValues, Mode=OneWay, UpdateSourceTrigger=PropertyChanged}" SelectedItem="{Binding ElementName=myItemsControl, Path=SelectedItem.ContactGroup, Mode=TwoWay, UpdateSourceTrigger=PropertyChanged}" Grid.Row="10" ...


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You could use a value converter: using System; using System.Collections; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.Linq; using System.Reflection; using System.Windows; using System.Windows.Data; namespace WpfApplication1 { public class SumConverter : IValueConverter { public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object ...


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public List<Folder> m_FolderList { get { List<Folder> list = new List<Process>(); list.AddRange(Manager.Instance.GetFolderDirectory().Values); return list; } } I hate doing this, but its the only method that worked here with the Heirarchical template. I've used a ...


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Is it layout rounding? Try MarqueeTB.UseLayoutRounding = false;


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Declare command public ICommand SaveCommand { get; set; } In constructor: public SelectedOrderViewModel() { SaveCommand = new RelayCommand(ExecuteSaveCommand, CanExecuteSaveCommand); } Methods: private bool CanExecuteSaveCommand() { return SelectedOrder.ContactName != null; } private void ExecuteSaveCommand() { ...


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Your example works for me, you shouldn't let yourself get confused by the error in the designer, at runtime it works - x:Reference bindings seem to confuse the designer quite a bit. Besides that, you have some minor errors in your value converter: ConvertBack returning 'value' is wrong, it should convert a Visbility to a Boolean. You should implement this ...


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Seems like you want to redefine style in your resource section. In case you want to do that, use StaticResourceExtension and also you have to set x:Key for any item declared under resources section. This should work: <StaticResourceExtension ResourceKey="PreviewSidePanelToggleButtonStyle" x:Key="SomeKey"/>


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Your SetData method should look like this: private void setData() { var doc = XDocument.Load("https://forex.boi.org.il/currency.xml" ); IEnumerable<Info> information = doc.Descendants("CURRENCY").Select(x => new Info() { nameV = x.Element("NAME").Value, unitV = x.Element("UNIT").Value, //etc... ...


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Since ContextMenu doesn't lie in same Visual tree as that of its placement target so ElementName binding won't work because it requires both controls to be in same Visual tree. Try using x:Reference which doesn't have this constraint of to be in same visual tree. CommandParameter="{Binding Source={x:Reference pieChart}}" OR use it like this ...


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To answer simbay's approach, which I think is being dismissed. You can't call Undo in TextChanged because the undo operation is still being prepared by the TextBox. It seems to work sometimes and not other times, so this suggests there is a race condition between when the event is signaled and the completion of the undo preparation. However calling Undo ...


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You have two options: In Visual Studio, open the cursor file or resource in the image editor and select the Hotspot Tool from the toolbar. Then click on the new hotspot and save the file. Create a cursor pragmatically using a bitmap and specify the hot spot yourself. The code below is from here: namespace CursorTest { public struct IconInfo { ...


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There is already an InteropBitmap class that can be used to convert a GDI bitmap to a WPF ImageSource, though I find it doesn't handle alpha channels very well. This is the mechanism I use: public static BitmapSource CreateBitmapSourceFromGdiBitmap(Bitmap bitmap) { if (bitmap == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("bitmap"); var rect = ...


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The Exception is because you are trying to assign Style to Resources . Resource property is of Type ResourceDictionary and your is of type Style so casting is not possible and Exception is thrown .I dont know why you doing this but why so ever you doing this it is incorrect you can access the PreviewSidePanelToggleButtonStyle directly instead of forwarding ...


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The primary benefit of using a command parameter is that you can execute the same command against different inputs, as opposed to one hard-coded input. Being able to delete any item is arguably more flexible than being able to delete just SelectedTemplate. In practice, I tend to favor using parameters. You can avoid the cast in your "execute" callback by ...


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There are a few things I think you could read up on to help you with your problem. I would start with Pack URIs in WPF so you can understand how to use a URI to check a specific library's location. Since these images are in another assembly's resource file, read the "Referenced Resource Assembly File" in the link. I think the other thing worth mentioning ...


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Use a content control with a ContentTemplateSelector: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.windows.controls.contentcontrol.contenttemplateselector(v=vs.110).aspx The ContentControl will be the placeholder for your grid content, and the content will be bound to your DataSource, which you will set at run time. You will implement some specific logic ...


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The only real difference is readability (and potentially one extra binding for the engine to have to evaluate, but that isn't going to really hurt you in this case). You are using SelectedTemplate either way so I wouldn't bother with binding it to the parameter and use it directly. Unless that is the only thing you are using SelectedTemplate for, in which ...


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As for the container you should use a Grid which will center and put on top of each other the controls in a same cell. As for drag and drop if you want to implement it yourself I've provided a minimal implementation here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/17014906/145757 Otherwise you can use the MouseDragElementBehavior behavior provided by Blend. Here is a ...


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To render a 3D scene in WPF, you have to use an element called ViewPort3D. This has a Camera, a collection of Visual3D. A concrete sub type of Visual3D is ModelVisual3D. This visual helps render the Model3D. All the 3D shape is represented by a GeometryModel3D (derives from Model3D). We just care about the property GeometryModel3D.Geometry (of type ...


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Interesting problem you have here. If you found a solution I'm interested in knowing it; and you should answer your own question if you did solve it. As for printing pages one by one, here's something you could try. PrintDialog dialog = PrintDialog(); var doc = FixedDocument.DocumentPaginator; for(int i = 0; i < doc.PageCount; i++) { ...


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I'd suggest another way around. If the grid supports export to CSV - use it instead. That will save you man months of work! If only I knew that before... Identifying cells and extracting values can be painful. Many grid controls do UI virtualization. The cells which do not fit the viewport won't be created. You'll have to scroll the grid to force their ...


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When you have lots of checks to perform, it can be useful to separate the validation from the execution logic. I would make a function GetEntry(...) that assumes valid inputs: private AddressBook GetEntry(BitmapImage image, string name, string phoneNumber) { return new AddressBook { FirstName = name, imageBytes = ...


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This a kind of task WPF is not very good at. I mean vector graphics in general. Thanks to the retained mode. It's good for controls rendering, but not for the busy graphs which you update a lot. I struggled with the same problem trying to render GPS tracks on a WPF map. I'd suggest using direct2d and hosting it in WPF. Something like that: ...


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It does indeed seem like the binding can't extract the property values - possibly because the types are generic. This is what you can see in VS Output window: `A first chance exception of type 'System.Reflection.TargetException' occurred in mscorlib.dll Error: Cannot get 'Value' value (type 'String') from type ...


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Like i stated in my comment above DataGridColumnHeader is in the VisualTree of DataGrid via DataGridColumnHeaderPresenter and not in the VisualTree of DataGridColumn. You can reach the Column through DataGridColumnHeader's Column property Column I didn't want to get into your implementation and logic because i'm sure there's a cleaner way of doing what ...


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DataGridTextColumn is no ancestor of DataGridColumnHeader


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I believe that your problem is a common one. Basically, you cannot use both the TreeView.ItemsSource and the TreeView.Items properties together... you must choose one way or the other. Usually this problem manifests itself because a developer has done something like this...: <TreeView Name="TreeView" ItemsSource="{Binding SomeCollection}" ... /> ... ...


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You're not too far off. All you would need is a trigger which responds to IsMouseOver and have a "highlighted brush color" when True, and the default color when False. <Style x:Key="SearchTile" TargetType="mah:Tile"> <Setter Property="Background" Value="{StaticResource SearchTileBrush}" /> <Style.Triggers> <Trigger ...


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You can try running that line of code asynchronously: void MyCommand(Project project) { Task.Factory.StartNew(() => NavigationService.AddNotification("Doin' it")); GetTheJobDone(project); ... } In this way, that line will complete without waiting for the GetTheJobDone long running process to complete.


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You can use a MultiTrigger to check if it is enabled. <ControlTemplate.Triggers> <MultiTrigger> <MultiTrigger.Conditions> <Condition Property="IsMouseOver" Value="True"/> <Condition Property="IsEnabled" Value="True"/> ...


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The change in look when the control is disabled comes from the default ControlTemplate of the Button. If you provide your own ControlTemplate, as it appears that you are doing, then that should override that change. Alternatively, you can just add a Trigger to handle the IsEnabled property to provide your own disabled look: <ControlTemplate.Triggers> ...


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I also add that "Key" and "Value" are case sensitive. In my code, SelectedValuePath="key" Doesn't work, the combobox shows empty items even if there as many as the dictionary length.


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If all you want to do is change the formatting of dates in a single control, then changing the application-wide locale is not the way to do that. Set a custom ItemTemplate on your ComboBox, and set the StringFormat on your Binding to 'dd/MM/yyyy'. If you really need to change the date format across your entire application, but you want to leave the other ...


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In the end I just declared arrays as resources (with the options that I wanted to provide to the end user) in my XAML like this: <ResourceDictionary xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" ...


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One solution is to have different resource files with same keys and values based on region and use culture to load respective region value


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Immediately after posting I found the solution. I was already using a ListBoxItem Style. If you add a setter that sets "IsHitTestVisible" to false, you can no longer select the list items, but the list box itself is unaffected. Here is my style: <Style x:Key="ListBoxItemStyle" TargetType="{x:Type ListBoxItem}"> <Style.Setters> ...


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Try messageBar.ApplyTemplate() before calling GetChildOfType


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Your question is not very clear, but I think that you want to catch unhandled Exceptions so that you can perform some work before the application closes. If that is correct, then you can try handling the AppDomain.UnhandledException event: public void MainWindow_UnhandledException(object sender, UnhandledExceptionEventArgs e) { Exception exception = ...


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Just adding Microsoft.Windows.Shell.dll to your project references, would solve the problem.


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Try {Binding key} or {Binding value} you can reduce code by this get { return _languages ?? (_languages = Utils.AvailableLanguages); }


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Well, I admit I have no idea what is going on. Did you try to add a fourth window? This become even stranger: the second window bring back the third, but the fourth is still not back. Anyway, If I had to manage this problem, I would keep a reference of my childWindow in each parent Window. This way on any interesting event (like activate on the second ...


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Remove the HorizontalAlignment="Left" from the ScrollViewer in your XAML


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If I am understanding your question correctly...you are trying to see if there is a way to detect which control is using the event being fired...In your event handler method you should have the object sender parameter. If you are trying to use the event for several different controls but make it possible for the event to do something different for each ...


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I imagine it is just to avoid bugs caused by typos and try and make the code a little easier to read. Also if you change the name of the property it means changing the value of the const will then work for all code that is checking if the property has changed. e.g. imagine this code: public void Main() { var obj = new ClassWithNotifier(); ...


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I struggled with this one for a while. In the end it turned out that my collection feeding the treeview was an ObservableCollection property, but was actually a list. As soon as I turned it into an ObservableCollection everything started working.



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