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0

I'm afraid no such APIs are available in UWP, but you can try to use UIViewSettings.GetForCurrentView | getForCurrentView method to detect the current interaction mode and then maybe do your work: switch (UIViewSettings.GetForCurrentView().UserInteractionMode) { case UserInteractionMode.Mouse: //TODO: break; case UserInteractionMode....


0

You can do it using Properties, by implementing the INotifyPropertyChanged Interface, and binding Properties to corresponding value sliders. For example: private int _GreenValue; private int _RedValue; private int _BlueValue; private Color _BackGroundColor; public int GreenValue { get { return _GreenValue; } set { _GreenValue = value; ...


0

I'm not understanding how you trying to save you color. But there is Color property in SolidColorBrush, so you can take all color components from that: var red = savedColor.Background.Color.R; var green = savedColor.Background.Color.G; var blue = savedColor.Background.Color.B;


1

Add TextWrapping="Wrap" to your TextBlock. Also! For the definitions of rows this has to happen: <Grid.RowDefinitions> <RowDefinition Height="*"/> <RowDefinition Height="Auto"/> </Grid.RowDefinitions>


0

While I do agree with a lot of the points in the answer provided by Ed, there is a simpler way to do this without DataTriggers or Converters. There is already a filterable CollectionViewSource in the framework that is your friend (Scott Hanselman loves it) I would bind ComboBoxA to your regular ChargedAccounts property, but I would modify ComboBoxB to: ...


-1

Give the comboboxes an ItemContainerStyle (TargetType="ComboBoxItem") with a data trigger. For ComboBoxA, that'll look like this: <ComboBox ... x:Name="ComboBoxA" ... > <ComboBox.ItemContainerStyle> <Style TargetType="ComboBoxItem"> <Style.Triggers> <DataTrigger Value="True"&...


1

The mouse events aren't working because the canvas's background isn't set. If a control (in this case your Canvas) has no background color set, the background color will default to null, and that makes the control non hit-testable. The background can be set either explicitly or through styles, and as long as it has a value different from null (even '...


0

If I understand you correctly, 'drag and drop' is not what you need. It is a method of data transfer, not a location setter. As per msdn: Drag-and-drop commonly refers to a method of data transfer that involves using a mouse (or some other pointing device) to select one or more objects, dragging these objects over some desired drop target in the ...


0

You achieve this with simple OO inhertance rather than anything tricky with WPF. A Manager is still an Employee, so change up your classes like this: public class Employee { public string Name; public string Id; public string Salary; Employee DirectReport; // ... } public class Manager : Employee { public int Rank; } Then ...


0

Little interest here so I hired a Mentor through Pluralsight. The bindings were correct, but the CustomControl had a RichTextBox which was capturing the Mouse Click. We fixed the issue using a Behavior targeting the Button's PreviewMouseDown.


2

Creating a DispatcherTimer must be done from a thread with an active Dispatcher or by passing an active dispatcher to the timer's constructor, e.g. new DispatcherTimer(Application.Current.Dispatcher) You should also consider if you really need a DispatcherTimer... A view model could most of the time do with a regular timer (e.g. System.Timers.Timer). Or ...


1

If you bind the grid with an observablecollection then I think you can make use of CollectionChanged event to detect if collection/data changed. Here is an example: /// <summary> /// The collection of drivers just changed: add or remove /// </summary> /// <param name="sender">Sernder of the Event.</param> /// <param name="e">...


1

you should use the SelectedItem property in your DataGrid or ListView SelectedItem="{Binding Path=YourSelectedItem}"


1

For this specific purpose WPF provides VisualStateManager. <UserControl ...> <Grid> <VisualStateManager.VisualStateGroups> <VisualStateGroup Name="States"> <VisualState x:Name="WithoutObject"> <Storyboard> <ObjectAnimationUsingKeyFrames ...


0

A simple way to do this would probably be via a Behavior. If you're working on WPF - internal class ManipulationDeltaCommandBehavior : Behavior<UIElement> { public ICommand ManipulationDeltaCommand { get; set; } protected override void OnAttached() { base.OnAttached(); AssociatedObject.ManipulationDelta += ...


1

I went by the output you want. Please check and tell if this is what you want. public partial class WinExpander : Window { public WinExpander() { InitializeComponent(); this.DataContext = new ViewModel(); } } public class ViewModel { public List<Country> Countries { get; set; } public ViewModel() ...


1

Please explain where I am going wrong and why. You are trying to statically cast to a dynamically determined type. The bad news: That doesn't work. Static types must be known at compile time. The good news: There's absolutely no need to do this: For your purposes, storing the reference in a generic object variable suffices: object item = ListView....


1

I would create two datatemplates in UserControl.Resources and swap them with a trigger. CreateUserTemplate just has a button bound to a CreateUserCommand, or a click event. EditUserTemplate is the user editing template. Content="{Binding}" without a path uses the DataContext as the Content. If I had the exact details of your viewmodel stuff I could give you ...


1

If you want to use the ListView's grouping abilities, you have to provide it a flat list of the items you want to group (in your case, the leagues), not the header items. The CollectionView does the grouping for you by specifying GroupDescriptions. For example, assuming the League class has a Country property: class ViewModel { public ...


0

To do this with ColorAnimation you could alter the GradientStops in the GradientStopCollection individually. If you don't want every button's appearance to be affected by a Button.Click, you need to move the LinearGradientBrush from Resources to the Rectangles.Fill property. <ControlTemplate TargetType="Button"> <Grid Width="{TemplateBinding ...


1

I did some modification of your style. Also, i fixed your Storyboard. It should now work properly. <Style TargetType="{x:Type Button}"> <Setter Property="Background" Value="{StaticResource GrayBlueGradientBrush}" /> <Setter Property="Width" Value="90" /> <Setter Property="Margin" Value="10" /> ...


1

Best would be to set a Binding for the X2 property and set it to ActualWidth of the TextBlock. Below is C# code, you can change it to VB.net : Line line = new Line() { Stroke = Brushes.Blue}; Binding binding = new Binding("ActualWidth"); binding.RelativeSource = new RelativeSource() { Mode=RelativeSourceMode.FindAncestor, ...


0

How to check if your MarkupExtension is used in Deisgner mode ? public override object ProvideValue(IServiceProvider serviceProvider) { IProvideValueTarget ipvt = (IProvideValueTarget)serviceProvider.GetService(typeof(IProvideValueTarget)); if (ipvt.TargetObject is DependencyObject && System.ComponentModel.DesignerProperties....


0

Create CollectionViewSource as a Resource. <CollectionViewSource x:Key="CVSKey" Source="{DynamicResource MyArray}"/> . Use this CollectionViewSource as your ItemsSource . Replace your View1 as : <!--<ListView Grid.Row="1" Grid.Column="0" Name="View1" ItemsSource="{DynamicResource ResourceKey=MyArray}"/>--> <ListView Grid.Row="1" Grid....


0

I ended up creating a custom class that used the bounding box of each Geometry to perform a tiered lookup. The first tier used the simple bounding box calculation to narrow the list of Geometry objects that were necessary to search. Each "bucket" was calculated using the average size of all Geometries in the collection. This has problems for the general ...


0

As in this question says, you can set binding with your code-behind. So, you can subscribe the yourgrid_AutoGeneratingColumn event and do this: (e.Column as DataGridTextColumn).Binding = new Binding("Title"); certainly you should pass your ColumnName into AutoGeneratingColumn event by some solutions...


1

I would not use code-behind for something like this. Absolutely painful. You'll find WPF much easier to work with if you confine the majority of UI development to an XAML front-end. Try something like this <Window x:Class="WpfApplication3.MainWindow" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" xmlns:x="http://schemas....


0

I think the path is either incorrect or invalid. You can modify your pre-build from Properties -> Build Events -> Pre-Build Event. Modify it and try again. It should work.


0

Change the OnSetFilterButtonClick Method as below private void OnSetFilterButtonClick(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) { //Create a new listview by the ItemsSource,Apply Filter to the new listview ListCollectionView listView = new ListCollectionView(View1.ItemsSource as IList); listView.Filter = IsAllowedItem; ...


0

In addition to the target framework on the Project Properties Application tab, you need to go to the Publish tab and click on "Prerequisites..." button. You should see a dialog which will allow you to change the .Net version.


0

I'm going to go ahead and assume you have a generic List of some type labeled as Team. Try this: List<Team> teams = new List<Team> { new Team {Name = "Italy"}, new Team {Name = "France"}, new Team {Name = "Italy"} }; var distinctList = teams.Select(team => team.Name) .Distinct() ....


0

Your question is ambiguous but I guess that you didn't group by your results based on the your city name.


0

You might find it simpler to use Mouse.Capture. https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms771301.aspx When an object captures the mouse, all mouse related events are treated as if the object with mouse capture perform the event, even if the mouse pointer is over another object.


0

This is an opinion based question. But still I will share my opinion. You can keep all the images within a specific folder within your project. Such as an Image folder or whatever name you would like to give it. While adding the item to your project, you can click on properties of the image and specify the Build Action to Resource in the properties window. ...


3

I am currently doing lot of research on async and await and currently somewhat addicted to it. So I could not stop myself from answering this one. Check out a small sample, below : XAML Code: <Grid > <Button x:Name="Button1" Content="Click Me" Width="88" Height="44" Click="Button1_Click"/> </Grid> Code Behind : private async void ...


0

I recomend to use your own class for save Class Library settings. Something like this: public class GlobalSettings { public double RedFiber { get; set; } public double GreenFiber { get; set; } public double BlueFiber { get; set; } public bool DeleteMinorViews { get; set; } public static GlobalSettings Load() { try {...


-3

try ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["conStr"].ToString(); If the does not work post your App.Config ConfigurationSettings.AppSettings is obsolete


1

Why don't you just put that value in the Main Project ? If you're calling the class library from the Main Project. Then the code in the class library uses the AppConfig defined inside the main project. It is a common practice to have the connection string in the AppConfig for the Main Project and not inside the Class Library.


1

It's best not to fight with the WPF DataGrid control at the UI layer. Without writing your own controls designed to suit your own purposes, you simply won't win that fight. There will always be another Microsoft "gotcha" to deal with. I recommend implementing the desired behaviour from the safe-haven of an ObservableCollection. public class ViewModel { ...


2

Better to use a safer place instead execution location. Take a place where the user has file write access like Documents, AppData etc. Because the application might be run in the different place where in some places possible user has no file write access, then you won't be able to save any images/files there.


2

you can have variables class that include public variables .define instance of class1 in varibels class . public static class1 myclass=new class1(); in test.xml.cs set value public void assignValue() { myclass.LogedInPerson = "test123"; } in class2.cs public void test() { string selected_dept =myclass.LogedInPerson; }


0

I believe this question is more on the topic of basic Object Oriented Programming principles, not so much about WPF specific features. Therefore, I will provide you a non-WPF specific answer, as it will allow me to address your question in the most direct way. In OOP, a method can return a result to the caller. So, for instance, public string ...


1

Initialize Class1 outside assignValue() methos Class1 obj = new Class1(); public void assignValue() { obj.LogedInPerson = "test123"; } public string returnValue() { return obj.LogedInPerson; } if your second class name test.xaml then call it like this, but I don't think you can use class name test.xaml so use a nice name instead there eg: Class2 ...


0

I ran into this issue and it was caused because my startup application was built as any CPU but I was referencing a project that was built as x64. Setting the startup to build x64 resolved the issue.


0

I had a similar issue and was able to resolve it by auto-generating the template for the ComboBox in Visual Studio 2015 (Right Click ComboBox in Design Window -> Edit Template -> Edit a Copy)


0

In windows 10, .ScrollToVerticalOffset is obsolete. so I use ChangeView like this. TextBlock messageBar; ScrollViewer messageScroller; private void displayMessage(string message) { messageBar.Text += message + "\n"; double pos = this.messageScroller.ExtentHeight; messageScroller.ChangeView(null, ...


0

It's better not to disable Virtualization since your application becomes totally unresponsive. You can directly use DataGridCheckBoxColumn, no need the heavy DataGridTemplateColumn <DataGridCheckBoxColumn Binding="{Binding NeedSendSms}"/> then in the ViewModel you can get all contacts with NeedSendSms is true. If you still want to use ...


0

Resources are shared by default. Try <c:ArrayList x:Key="MyArray" x:Shared="false"> <s:String>Letter A</s:String> <s:String>Letter B</s:String> <s:String>Letter C</s:String> </c:ArrayList>


0

Change your StateLogin-Class to public class StateLogin : INotifyPropertyChanged { private int _loginState; // helping variable to trigger login state change public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged; public int LoginState { get { return _loginState; } set { ...


1

You can set the TextBlock Text in Style <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal" Height="22"> <TextBlock Text="{Binding Name}" FontWeight="Bold" Foreground="White" FontSize="22" VerticalAlignment="Bottom" /> <TextBlock Text="{Binding ItemCount}" FontSize="22" Foreground="Orange" FontWeight="Bold" FontStyle="Italic" Margin="10,0,0,0" ...



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