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In your UserControl you programmatically set its DataContext property to the UserControl itself. So when you use your UserControl inside a Window, it cannot inherit the Window's DataContext. Your Usercontrol has no TestValue property, so you obtain a bining error message. The simpiest solution is to remove the DataContext setting from your UserControl and ...


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Apparently this is impossible as it looks like the exception is throwing BEFORE the IValueConverter has a chance to do its job... If anybody knows an alternative way to go about this that does not involve iterating the source collection and setting all the images to frozen please let me know.


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You got a general misunderstanding here about MVVM, Views and UserControls. A UserControl is a reusable piece of code, that is not specific to one kind of application. That being said, there is no UserControl1ViewModel, when you create a new UserControl. A UserControl is self-sustained and all the logic your user control needs goes in there in code ...


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It is a good example to show MVVM approach. Code below will do the job: XAML <Window x:Class="simplest.MainWindow" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008" ...


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You could try to use Fluent.Ribbon. It's open source, should work well with MahApp.Metro and the showcase application shows both being used together. Just download the showcase application, unzip it, run it and have a look at the tab below the ribbon which has the "Test" header. Said tab contains a button "Open MahMetro-Window" which you just have to click. ...


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You haven't assigned the DataContext to ViewModel anywhere. Assuming you want teh ViewModel to be the ViewModel of MainWindow, I suggest you assigne it before Initialize Component as shown below. Since its never assigned you are getting null public MainWindow() { ConnectFourViewModel ViewModel = new ConnectFourViewModel(); . . . . . . ...


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0) Create an Object to represent your "Vital" row 1) Bind an ObservableCollection<Vital>to your DataGrid's ItemSource <DataGrid ItemsSource="{Binding vitalList}" /> 2) Fill this ObservableCollection<T> with your data vitalList.Add(myNewVital); 3) Since ObservableCollection fires an event when an item is added/removed or changed, add ...


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Have a look at Environment.GetFolderPath (MSDN) Now, as you clarified it's for log4net have a look at the following question Log4net output to My Documents


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Is this what you are looking for? string path = System.Environment.GetFolderPath(Environment.SpecialFolder.MyDocuments); Edit If you logging other than log4net. You need not store the log file path in the app.config in that case. because whatever you write in app.config you will end up overriding it. So it will be misleading and useless. If you want to ...


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ImageViewer not have supported for simple use. I recomended use MediaElement. It's easier and supported gif for animation. <MediaElement x:Name="gif" MediaEnded="gif_MediaEnded" UnloadedBehavior="Manual" Source=@"giphy.gif" LoadedBehavior="Play" Stretch="None"/> And for looping: private void gif_MediaEnded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) { ...


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ItemTemplate and ItemSource are the properties you need to set. ItemTemplate should point to Datatemplate and ItemSource to Collection of strings(path to images). This link will help you.


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You can use "StateChanged" event of the window. It fires when "WindowState" property changes. You can use this event and maximize the window when the state changed to minimized. UPDATE Try this code: private async void Window_StateChanged_1(object sender, EventArgs e) { await MaximizeWindow(this); } public Task MaximizeWindow(Window ...


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// P/Invoke constants private const int WM_SYSCOMMAND = 0x112; private const int MF_STRING = 0x0; private const int MF_SEPARATOR = 0x800; // P/Invoke declarations [DllImport("user32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto, SetLastError = true)] private static extern IntPtr GetSystemMenu(IntPtr hWnd, bool bRevert); [DllImport("user32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto, ...


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1) Visual Studio creates a xaml.cs file (code behind) automatically. 2) You can use Frame.Navigate(typeof(OtherXAMLScreen))


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There are a lot of questions on stackoverflow related with this topic but no solid answer. So I decided to post my solution as the answer to this problem. The context of the problem is to check "the user must select one item in the listbox which is bound with observable collection". First step, the item (entity) in the ObservableCollection need IsSelected ...


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You are missing the && operator after (values[4] != null).


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The problem is Windows XP. Simply speaking it uses an older UI stack. I am not exactly sure how that one works (it is ANCIENT) but it may well be it has to move from using the video overlay mechanism in the graphics card (which likely is old anyway) to using projected directX surfaces. Which may be not fully supported by the ancient version. Modern Windows ...


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If you check the Debug Output you will see the following error: System.Windows.Data Error: 40 : BindingExpression path error: 'MyTextUC2' property not found on 'object' ''UserControl1' (Name='text2')'. BindingExpression:Path=MyTextUC2; DataItem='UserControl1' (Name='text2'); target element is 'UserControl1' (Name='text2'); target property is 'MyTextUC1' ...


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My application is an extension to Visual Studio to print the source of one or more items(methods, properties, documents, projects etc) in color. I wanted to provide progress to the user showing the line number in the document being processed. If I do that the overall task to process a document is many times slower, even more slower to print the source code ...


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May I propose another approach? From what I understand; You have suppliers and these suppliers have items. You can add new suppliers. I assumed suppliers may not have all the items (for a challenge :)). You want to present this data structure in a grid like view. The problem here is that you are trying to display a non-tabular data with a tabular view ...


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You need to set DataContext of your window to this, to access your property in XAML, and after that bind to the property. As you are binding not to DependencyProperty, you should notify your binding that property has changed, which could be done by implementing INotifyPropertyChanged interface in your Window. I've provided sample code to show the concept. ...


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It should be <xctk:WizardPage.CanSelectNextPage> <MultiBinding Converter="{StaticResource CanSelectNextPage1}"> <Binding ElementName="RadioButNew" Path="IsChecked" Mode="OneWay"/> <Binding ElementName="RadioButUpdate" Path="IsChecked" Mode="OneWay"/> <Binding ElementName="outputFolder" Path="Text" ...


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Actually Frame.Navigate("Hello world") works without problems. There is no limitation on what you can set as the content parameter. Quote from WPF Unleashed about Frame: The Frame control holds arbitrary content, just like all other content controls, but it isolates the content from the rest of the user interface. For example, properties that would ...


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I figured out what was wrong. Basically, all the items in the listview that are not in view, return null. So I just had to set VirtualizingStackPanel.IsVirtualizing="False" in my listview xaml. Then the listview will update properly


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Make sure you have xmlns:i="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/2010/interactivity" In your <UserControl> tag Then use this piece of code <i:Interaction.Triggers> <i:EventTrigger EventName="Loaded"> <i:InvokeCommandAction Command="{Binding YourCommand}" CommandParameter = {Binding YourParameter} /> ...


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I finally got it to work!! The problem lies in the fact that Viewbox scaling is based on the design time size of the child object. Even if the actual size of the internal child objects are bigger, they will still report their design time size also to the ActualWidth and ActualHeight properties. This is kind of confusing. The workaround is to create the ...


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I think this is what you're looking for: <TabControl ItemsSource="{Binding MC}"> <TabControl.Resources> <Style TargetType="{x:Type TabItem}"> <Setter Property="Background" Value="#01535F" /> <Setter Property="Foreground" Value="Azure" /> <Setter Property="FontSize" Value="16" ...


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You can create different styles in a ResourceDictionary and reference your ResourceDictionary in your App.xaml. Then you can at any time from your code change the style of any element. Eg: <ResourceDictionary> <Style x:Key="Style1BackgroundRed" TargetType="{x:Type Window}"> <Setter Property="Background" Value="Red"/> ...


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Why not just inherit from ContentControl? It obviously has content. Then Create a template for your control which contains a ContentControl who is bound by <ContentControl Content="{Binding RelativeSource="{RelativeSource Mode=TemplatedParent}, Path=Content}"/> I think thats right anyhow.. i'm on my phone. Man I love Intellisense.. Anyhow, ...


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Although implementing the 'Click' events in your code behind will make that code work you really need to take a look at MVVM.... http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/126249/MVVM-Pattern-in-WPF-A-Simple-Tutorial-for-Absolute Take my word for it, any project that is more than a few lines AND doesn't use MVVM will be unmaintainable spaghetti code.... I have ...


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The declaration of the converter in the Resources collection should be before the reference to the converter. You can fix it like this: <Window x:Class="UI.ChildWindow" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" ...


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ContextMenu doesn't get same DataContext as your UserControl. You can set it manually. private void ContextMenu_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) { (sender as FrameworkElement).DataContext = this; } and your command will work fine.


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You need to create a ListViewItem Style: <ListView.ItemContainerStyle> <Style TargetType="ListViewItem"> <Setter Property="IsSelected" Value="{Binding IsSelected}" /> </Style> </ListView.ItemContainerStyle> Create a property in Model class: public bool IsSelected { get { return isSelected; } set ...


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Write your IsSelected Property as : private bool _is_selected; public bool IsSelected { get { return _is_selected; } set { if (_is_selected != value) { _is_selected = value; UpdateProperty("IsSelected"); //We also need to raise the HasTripOrError ...


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So first, if you would like to use Databinding in WPF, you should declare a Property other than a Field. So your testClass should look like this: public class testClass { public Size testInnerSize { get; set; } public testClass() { testInnerSize = new Size(66, 99); } } And if you would like to take the ...


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Just adding my own 2c. This is based on the answer given by @Grant with the following changes: This properly uses the _rightButtonDown flag, not the CaptureMouse property to determine processing since CaptureMouse may have been set elsewhere (i.e. this adheres to proper encapsulation.) This has support for the ClickMode property allowing for a value of ...


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You don't need to create an extra object on your ViewModel. When your View is Defined by your DataTemplate DataType. It will automatically passed to your View. See this answer to understand DataContext here Remove your below code from your View and check the DataContext, it will be local:AccountViewModel: <UserControl.DataContext> ...


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Try this: <Grid Name="grid"> <Grid.Resources> <Style TargetType="Button"> <Style.Triggers> <Trigger Property="Visibility" Value="Collapsed"> <Setter Property="Tag" Value="0"/> </Trigger> </Style.Triggers> ...


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Are you using Unity? Have you read https://software.intel.com/sites/landingpage/realsense/camera-sdk/v1.1/documentation/html/index.html?doc_devguide_unity__application.html On the WPF - have you looked at https://software.intel.com/en-us/blogs/2015/12/05/project-template-to-develop-wpf-applications-with-intel-realsense


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A general approach to designing well behaved applications that need to do processing is that the work should be done on another thread, with periodic messages posted back to the UI to update it on progress. BackgroundWorker may suit your application - https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc221403%28v=vs.95%29.aspx?f=255&MSPPError=-2147217396


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Personally, I would keep away from actually instantiating individual columns, instead add them to the DataGridView directly, and then manipulate their properties. List<MyClass> myList = new List<MyClass>(); BindingList<MyClass> bList = new BindingList<MyClass>(myList); myDataGridView.DataSource = new BindingSource(bList,null); ...


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This has already been answered but you may not know that there is some Frameworks around to avoid boilerplate code related to commands (and INotifyPropertyChanged) in MVVM. One of the most famous is MVVM Light that will handle a few things for you. Using this framework, this is how you handle a command with parameters : (Note : We're going to create a ...


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As stated on the Content property description of the ContentControl class : Because the Content property is of type Object, there are no restrictions on what you can put in a ContentControl.The Content is displayed by a ContentPresenter, which is in the ControlTemplate of the ContentControl. Every ContentControl type in WPF has a ...


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Use the DataTrigger as below: <DataTrigger Binding="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self},Path=Content.Text}" Value="1"> <Setter Property="Background" Value="#263DDE36"/> </DataTrigger> Now as long as you are not defining DataGridCell's ControlTemplate above binding will work fine. If you ever define Template then ...


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use CommandParameter="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource AncestorType={x:Type StackPanel}},Path=DataContext}" to pass entire item as CommandParameter. You can also use templateParent/ Self Binding instead of Ancestor Binding. DataContext will be the same for all.


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Use ScrollViewer in a window as following: <ScrollViewer MaxHeight="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource AncestorType={x:Type Border}},Path=ActualHeight,Mode=OneWay}"> <canvas> ............ </ScrollViewer> A Sample Output: (Bind the MaxWidth of Scrollviewer also if there is problem with width too)


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You can bind TreeViewItem's property like this: <TreeView> <TreeView.Resources> <Style TargetType="TreeViewItem"> <Setter Property="Tag" Value="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Ancestortype={x:Type TreeView}},Path=DataContext.anyobjectofViewmodel}"/> </Style> ...


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This has changed in version 3 of the YouTube API. There is a new endpoint called commentThreads/list which allows you to return a thread of comments for a resource. If you want to return a list of comments on a video resource, set up a GET request with part=id,snippet and videoId=[VIDEO_ID]. I'll be using https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HwNIDcwfRLY as an ...


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You simply need to use Ancestor binding from within ContentControl's any child element : {Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource AncestorType={x:Type Window},Path=DataContext.AnyPropertyOfMainWindowViewModel} If Window has MainWindowViewModel as DataContext.


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You are probably getting an NullReferenceException because your cast DataRowView rowview = DG1.SelectedItem as DataRowView; is invalid and returning null. That means that whatever type DG1.SelectedItem is, it cannot be cast to the type "DataRowView". For accessing the ID itself, Kylo Ren's answer is probably the best way to approach it. Edit: Because ...



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