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WScript refers to the Windows Script Host, particularly the Windows-based standalone script host, implemented in Wscript.exe, which is part of every Windows OS. "Windows based" means it can produce an interactive UI that employs graphical windows, dialog boxes and message boxes. The alternative is Cscript.exe, which is a console-based script host. There's a separate tag for that. Wscript can run JavaScript, VBScript, and scripts in other languages.

WScript refers to the Windows Script Host, particularly the Windows-based standalone script host, implemented in Wscript.exe, which is part of every Microsoft Windows OS installation, since Windows 98.

"Windows based" means that scripts running within wscript.exe can emit an interactive UI that employs graphical windows, dialog boxes and message boxes. The alternative is console UI, which is possible using the alternative script host implementation in Windows Script Host, Cscript.exe.

Windows Script Host (sometimes abbreviated as WSH), in both Wscript.exe and Cscript.exe guises, can run VBScript and JavaScript, via Microsoft-provided script engines. In addition to those two, there are third-party provided script engines, for Python, REXX, Perl, and other languages, which you can download and add to WSH. (The script engines that add into WSH are distinct from standalone script interpreters that might exist for those languages, on Windows). Regardless of whether the UI is console based or graphical, the same underlying script engine is used.

In 2006, Microsoft released v1.0 of Windows PowerShell, which could be conceived as a replacement for, or successor of, Windows Script Host. PowerShell is now included in every Windows OS. Even so, WSH is still included in every Windows OS, and many Wscript programs will continue to be in service, for many years.

Related tags include: vbscript, cscript, jscript,wsh and wsf

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