Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

You need to link with richtext library explicitly, it's not included in the default list of libraries output by wx-config --libs which you presumably use. I.e. you need wx-config --libs std,richtext.


0

Do not know if it was the most elegant solution, but it was the only one that worked. I copied the memory of the socket in the heap and passed her position to the constructor. That way I can store multiple socket and uses them way indepedent.


2

Creating custom controls in wxWidgets is pretty straightforward, this is not something reserved for the grand masters only. Basically, just derive a new C++ class (from wxWindow, you don't need wxPanel for a custom control like this, so why derive from it needlessly?), bind to the events you're interested in (at least wxEVT_PAINT, quite often wxEVT_CHAR and ...


1

Not an answer, but too lengthy for a comment. Without definite stated goals, which is best seems likely to be entirely subjective and a matter of personal preference. That said, I guess which implementation ultimately comes down to a number of factors. As a minimum: Do you think it likely that you'll want hexagon-shaped controls in the future How close ...


2

No need to create your own control. wxButton can display a bitmap. You might also use wxBitmapButton to count coordinates and understand to which hex he clicked Actually, this is the way I would do it, instead of mucking about with numerous identical controls one for each hex. It is almost trivial, if all your hexes are the same size. When user clicks ...


1

See this: /usr/include/wx-3.0-unofficial/wx/socket.h:303:29: error: ‘wxSocketBase::wxSocketBase(const wxSocketBase&)’ is private wxDECLARE_NO_COPY_CLASS(wxSocketBase); This means the socket object can't be copied since it's copy constructor is private. You code should keep a reference to the socket object instead (or a pointer).


0

You need a semicolon after wxDEFINE_EVENT() macro (as for almost all macros with wx prefix, they consistently require a semicolon, unlike the legacy macros without the prefix). As usual, see the sample for the example of use of this macro.


1

That's the thing about computer programming: at some time you always have to settle down and write some code. All those applications that promise to write code for you have to be abandoned at some point and you actually have to do some work: you have reached that point. ( Here is a link to more about this ) Here is a brief introduction to writing code to ...


0

The only real solution is to use multiple threads and perform the long operation in a background thread. If you want to keep your code simple, you can use wxYield() to handle the events from inside this event handler, but be aware that this may (and will) result in difficult to debug problems due to reentrancy, so at the very least you need to disable the ...


2

void wxSlider::SetLineSize(int lineSize)


0

The correct answer depends on which encoding do you need the narrow (char*) string to be in. If this is the encoding of the current locale, then you could indeed just use wcstombs() as mentioned by @AngeloDM. Otherwise you can use either the methods of some wxMBConv-derived class directly (e.g. wxMBConvUTF8 or wxMBConvUTF16 for the specific encodings or ...


0

Use the standard function: #include <stdlib.h> wchar_t* p = L"Ciao Mondo"; char v[50]; wcstombs(v, p, 10);


0

In wxWidgets 3.0 you have wxSimplebook which allows you to just add different pages (i.e. arbitrary windows) to it and switch between them. If you're using an earlier version you can still just drop the contents of wx/simplebook.h into your project and use it, it's a very simple class and you can read its code in 30 seconds to see how it is implemented.


1

I can only answer the situation for CMake and Qt. If you are using Qt together with CMake, you can build executables which are working for Windows and Linux without changing a line of code, or the need to have conditional code. This is also the reason why Qt got this dominant. It simply saves a lot of time, because you have to write all your code only once, ...


-1

For my projects I tend to use wxWidgets (where I need a GUI) on both Linux and Windows. For windows I use mingw-w64 as toolchain with wxWidgets compiled statically (or any other library that I use). So when I deliver a new release for the windows platform I don't need to worry about dependencies for the end-user, since that is being statically linked in the ...


0

As I mentioned you shouldn't draw on a wxFrame. Instead you can use a wxPanel to draw your stuff. Here is a link with a drawing example


0

Here is a simple working solution I came accross to auto open pdf file generated with ReportLab. Import subprocess and ReportLab modules as usual. Then link this function to your event (the magic part of the code is subprocess.Popen.....) def SaveToPDF_Function( self, event ): NameString = self.NameField.GetValue() try: c = ...


0

Run ./configure - it will check whether you have all required tools and libs. Read all error messages and install missing elements. If you have all required elements then ./configure will create makefile. Run make - it wiil use makefile to compile wxPython. Run make install - it will use makefile to copy wxPython to the required directories. That's all. ...


0

I don't know why exactly does this happen but this looks like a bug in wxWidgets. In practice, this means that it you shouldn't rely on this behaviour because it might (and in fact I'm pretty sure it does) behave differently under other platforms and also could change in future wxWidgets versions.


2

The issue is that you are creating a local variable that happens to match the name you used in your class. // Create Logger Class cLogStore * cl_LogStore = new cLogStore( ); The cl_LogStore here is not the same as the member variable cl_LogStore. It is a local variable. Thus not only did you call delete on an invalid pointer value, you have a memory ...


0

If you care about the quality of the result (i.e. unless you just want to generate small thumbnails as quickly as possible), you should use wxImage::Scale() with wxIMAGE_QUALITY_HIGH instead of its default wxIMAGE_QUALITY_NORMAL quality. If this doesn't fix the issues you're seeing, it would be interesting to see the images reproducing the problem (please ...


1

After hours studying and trying, I solved the problem. wxPrintf("Waiting for connection...\n"); wxSocketBase socketTest; socketServer->AcceptWith(socketTest, true); if (socketTest.IsConnected()) { wxPrintf("Success\n"); } else { wxPrintf("Not connected\n"); } In the manual is written a detail that had not understood: Accepts an incoming ...


0

You can't just replace the symbols in the compiler options. You need to rebuild the library itself to use GTK instead of the native MSW toolkit. This can, actually, be done, see https://github.com/wxWidgets/wxWidgets/blob/master/docs/msw/gtk.txt, but this is an experimental platform and I don't advise you to use it if you're new to wxWidgets. If you really ...


2

wxMiniFrame uses wxFRAME_FLOAT_ON_PARENT style when created with a non-NULL parent which is appropriate for palette-like windows, that mini frames are supposed to be used for. If you don't want it, you could create a regular wxFrame with wxFRAME_TOOL_WINDOW style.


2

First, catch wxEVT_PAINT and do the drawing in its hadler, using a wxPaintDC (or one of its variants - wx[Auto]BufferedPaintDC). Second, you are now attempting to paint on pannello, and for that you do not need to prepare the wxDC. However, from your description you want to paint on scrollwin, and in that case you might not even need pannello. So, for ...


1

Not automatically but you just need to call wxDataViewCtrl::EnsureVisible() to do it.


0

Rebuilding wxWidgets library and the whole application binaries with latest wxWidgets 3.0.1 cleared the issue. Now the application works; I am not sure if this was due to a wrong configuration of my project files or to a wxWidgets bug.


1

This isn't a wxPython question at all. The fact that you are displaying the CSV data in a wxGrid is just implementation. What you really want is to filter out the empty rows/cols from the list you generated from the CSV. Below ideas could get you started (but aren't optimized at all - I wanted to show the individual basic steps which you should take as ideas ...


2

I don't know the specifics in this case but wxWidgets will sometimes use threads to help it do things such as receiving certain types of out-of-band notifications, general housekeeping, etc. Additionally, in some cases the native toolkit that wxWidgets is built upon will use threads itself for similar types of things. In general you can ignore those ...


0

You can use wxTimer to perform an action at some point in the future, just start it with the interval equal to the difference between this point and now (wxDateTime can help you with that).


1

Looks like the wxTimer class generates an event when the duration has elapsed: wxTimerEvent documentation.


0

I would use the boost::asio deadline timer for this. void handler(boost::system::error_code ec) { ... } ... io_service i; ... deadline_timer t(i); t.expires_from_now(boost::posix_time::seconds(400)); t.async_wait(handler); ... i.run(); http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_55_0/doc/html/boost_asio/overview/timers.html


0

You can use wxScrolled::IsScrollbarShown(wxHORIZONTAL) for this but are you sure you actually need it? It's pretty unusual to have to do things differently depending on whether the scrollbar is shown or not and you should also consider that some platforms don't show scrollbars all the time but just bring them up when the mouse hovers near the window edge.


0

Try this plain Win32 code: function IsScrollBarVisible(AWindow: HWND; AVert: Boolean): Boolean; var Code: Integer; Info: TScrollInfo; begin if AVert then Code := SB_VERT else Code := SB_HORZ; Code := SB_VERT; Info.cbSize := SizeOf(Info); Info.fMask := SIF_RANGE or SIF_PAGE; GetScrollInfo(AWindow, Code, Info); Result := (Info.nMin ...


1

Handling the usual wxEVT_CLOSE_WINDOW should work fine for mini frames too. In any case, you can always do it from your wxMiniFrame-derived class dtor.


2

Your IDE doesn't seem to recognize the backticks expansion mechanism, so you need to run wx-config --cxxflags in the terminal and then copy and paste the output into the IDE instead of using it there directly (and possibly complain to NetBeans developers and hope that they do add support for this very useful functionality in future versions).


0

I assume that your paths are correct. You need to make sure that the machine you are running on has the proper codecs and DLLs. If you do not have the opencv_ffmpeg DLLs, then Highgui falls back on DirectX or VfW codecs. If, in that case, you do not have the proper CODECs, then opening the file will fail. This is unlike the other OpenCV DLLs which ...


0

I'd been trying to create a custom splash screen that incorporated a progress gauge (loading bar) using wxPython that loaded automatically on start up. After some tweaking, I was finally able to create one. In order to do this, I had to override the application's MainLoop() method. Below is the Application module I used. class Application(wx.App): ...


0

First of all, I would create the reportlab module so that you can actually call it. As it is currently implemented, it will immediately create the PDF whenever it is run. You need to put all the reportlab code into a function of some sort. Since this is a really simple reportlab script, I just combined it with the wxPython code and removed the threading ...


0

// Build: g++ this.cpp -std=gnu++11 $(wx-config --cxxflags --libs core,base) #include <wx/wx.h> class CApp : public wxApp { public: bool OnInit() { // Create the main frame. wxFrame * frame = new wxFrame(NULL, wxID_ANY, wxT("demo")); // Add the menubar wxMenu * menus[] = {new wxMenu, new wxMenu}; wxString ...


0

Just to add a little bit... If you're on linux you need to watch the logs when running configure. If it can't find opengl dev packages then it will turn opengl off with one line of warning which is easy to miss. run it like this to make it more obvious what development libraries you're actually missing (it looks like the --with-opengl is on by default in ...


2

Actually you can. It is wxDateTime (time_t timet), described as seconds since the Epoch 00:00:00 UTC, Jan 1, 1970. The proof that this works (wxW 3.0.0): wxDateTime wxDateTime::UNow() { return wxDateTime(wxGetUTCTimeMillis()); }


0

If it's just the current time you are interested in, there's also wxDateTime::UNow(). But in general, I would agree with your assessment. One would think a wxLongLong would be allowed from one of the constructors.



Top 50 recent answers are included