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14

Just do: $ ssh -X username@cornell.unix.edu This should launch ssh with X forwarding enabled, when run from a terminal emulator like Xterm, gnome-terminal and the like. username should be your account name on the remote computer, of course.


12

Reading the paramiko code, I realized that paramiko only implements a way to establish an x11 channel. It does not connect the channel to the local x11 display. That is left to you. Here is a small implementation that I have just written: #!/usr/bin/env python import os import select import sys import paramiko import Xlib.support.connect as xlib_connect ...


11

I finally found the answer (at least for my situation)! The problem was SELinux. I turned off SELinux, and it worked with no problem. If you interested in all of the gory details, you can read about it on my blog, but let me detail the pertinent facts here... On the remote machine, I used dmesg to view the logging messages: dmesg | tail I found a ...


11

So, it turns out that X11 wasn't actually installed on the centOS. There didn't seem to be any indication anywhere of it not being installed. I did the following command and now firefox opens: yum groupinstall 'X Window System' Hope this answer will help others that are confused :)


4

Give option -X on command line to enable X11 forwarding (graphical interfaces). ssh -X user@hostname It can be also enabled per host basis by setting "ForwardX11" to "yes" in configuration file (~/.ssh/config). Support for X11 forwarding needs to be also enabled in the target server's sshd configuration file (/etc/ssh/sshd_config) with option ...


4

The ArchLinux wiki has some good instructions on setting things up. I struggled for a while until I found them, but for me the key was to set up SSH forwarding within sshd_config (most distros seem to enable this by default, but Arch doesn't). Once you've enabled X forwarding in SSHD, I also found it helpful to install the dummy video driver for Xorg ...


4

In X11 rendering always happens on the X11 server side, i.e. on the system that the display server is running on. How would you run a graphics-intensive workload in such a way that it took advantage of the cluster's graphics hardware? By running the X11 server on the clusters' systems and only redirect the output to the display system. There are ...


4

You can use SSH X11 forwarding to display the window locally but have it run on a remote machine. There are many tutorials available and the configuration, while often not complicated, varies based on your operating system and such, and so I would recommend you simply Google the phrase "ssh x11 forwarding" to learn more about setting it up. SSH X11 ...


3

You need to have the DISPLAY variable set properly for X11 forwarding to work correctly -- something ssh -X or ssh -Y should do for you. What is the value of DISPLAY before and after the crash (echo $DISPLAY)? It should be something like localhost:10.0. I'm wondering if the variable gets messed up does not exit cleanly. Also, try using -Y instead of -X ...


3

Try to launch QtCreator with -graphicssystem native parameter. Three graphics backends are supported in Qt4(.5+) (native, raster and opengl). Native appears to be adapted for SSH X-forward use whereas others appears better for local use. It worked for me with QtCreator version 2.5.0 when I was working on Qt4, but it does not work after my fresh update to ...


3

There is a hard, if not even impossible, to find (by search engine) scenario that may may cause that error message. Preliminary note: The topic of this answer is not to discuss if it is a safety risc or recommondable at all to use a graphical desktop as root on an remote, display-less, webserver. Scenario: A remote internet connected Linux server S has ...


2

I ended up using startx instead, which starts a single-window x session. This is much better for launching gnome-session and confines it to a single monitor. $ nohup startx & $ ssh -Y redhat [user@redhat ~]$ gnome-session


2

I got the same issue on a Debian OpenVZ container and the problem seemed to come from my /etc/hosts file where "localhost" was affected to the LAN IP, not 127.0.0.1. Before : 192.168.0.15 dagi dagi.domain.net localhost localhost.localdomain After : 192.168.0.15 dagi dagi.domain.net 127.0.0.1 localhost localhost.localdomain After that, both ssh ...


2

Enable X forwarding in PuTTY. Option is in Connection/SSH/Tunnels.


2

It would be helpful to show the complete sequence of commands you use to initiate the connection and start MATLAB, along with any error messages. For example: # batch mode client$ ssh -v -x user@server # small "x" disables X11 forwarding server$ unset DISPLAY server$ nohup matlab -nodesktop -nodisplay -noFigureWindows -nosplash \ -r ...


2

I solved it - it was an authentication issue. Executing the following line on Server resolved the issue: $ xauth add ${client_ip}:0 . ${hex_key} xauth: creating new authority file /homes/${username}/.Xauthority where ${client_ip} is the client with X server running, ${hex_key} is the 32-character hex string. Afterwards upon assinging the $DISPLAY env ...


2

I found a temporary solution. I have two monitors (laptop and external monitor). I disabled the laptop monitor and it runs smoothly now. This solution is based upon this post: Workaround for Slow Java Swing Menus .


2

I was able to get this working by forwarding the Selenium port from my localhost to my Vagrant environment. From my local machine: ssh -R 4444:localhost:4444 vagrant The reference to 'vagrant' in the above command is a reference to my ~/.ssh/config file and the entry I have in it. I then ran java -jar selenium-server-standalone-[VERSION].jar from my ...


1

It turned out that it is actually pretty easy to run Xephyr within a docker container since Docker 1.5 using the command sudo docker run -e DISPLAY -v /tmp:/tmp --ipc=host --pid=host xephyrtest Xephyr :1 The two additional parameters are --ipc=host allows the container to use the same IPC namespace as the host and hence also has access to the same ...


1

Much better solution from Google themselves: https://medium.com/google-cloud/linux-gui-on-the-google-cloud-platform-800719ab27c5


1

Please read the gitcredentials(7) manual page (you can run git help credentials to read it locally). It explains how Git manages the problem of obtaining your credentials. Namely, the usage of the GIT_ASKPASS environment variable might be of interest to you. Alternatively, you could allow your SSH client to forward connection to your local agent (the ...


1

You need an X "server" running on your local Windows machine. (Yes, the terminology is confusing). Try http://mobaxterm.mobatek.net/ Note, the correct DISPLAY setting will be created by Putty automatically, so don't change it (localhost:10 sounds about right).


1

No, I'm afraid this is not possible. Currently only the 8080 http proxy port is exposed to the outside world. However, you can use Cloud9 with another remote machine, e.g. one from digitalocean.com. See also https://docs.c9.io/run_your_own_workspace.html.


1

A simpler and more robust approach is to run ipython remotely as you did, and instead of trying to plot the figures remotely, instead save them remotely. At the same time mount the remote directory using sftp and open it in your local file browser. Make sure to refresh your directory view in case the images that were saved remotely are not visible (otherwise ...


1

I bumped into this, too. But in my case it was because I removed IPv6 support some days ago. I then bumped into this thread explaining how to make sure sshd uses IPv4 only. This is how I did it, add this: AddressFamily inet to your ssh_config-file (on Ubuntu /etc/ssh/sshd_config) and make sshd reload its configuration (kill -SIGHUP pid-of-sshd).


1

You should connect with the -X or -Y option to be able to launch graphical applications: ssh -X ak324@bert.eecs.qmul.ac.uk If that doesn't help, you should consult /etc/ssh/sshd_config whether X11Forwarding is enabled.


1

The client and server seem "backwards" in the world of X, because your workstation is the "server," providing the service of a display device and keyboard/mouse... while the program you are running, often remotely, is the "client," using those display and input devices services. So the program you want to run needs to be able to connect "backwards" to your ...


1

To partially answer your question: yes, you can create a virtual X server on the remote machine with Xvfb, which stands for X Virtual Frame Buffer. It's just a X server that uses a block of memory for display and no GPU at all. Try something like this: mkdir -p $HOME/fb Xvfb :2 -screen 0 1280x1024x24 -fbdir $HOME/fb & sleep 3 # wait a bit cudamat ...


1

Before you ask a question it's recommended that you try to do some research on your own. A little searching can go a long way. Anyways how-to-enable-x11-forwarding-with-ssh-on-mac-os-x-leopard MIT article on the subject my Google search If you can't get it working, I suggest looking at the Super User Q&A forums. Super User is similar to Stack ...


1

the x11 request may use a MIT-MAGIC-COOKIE-1 that you may not handled properly using ssh directly I saw it needed to confirm the x11 request (cookie challenge?) the .Xauthority file may also be an issue you can try to strace ssh process and see a normal flow in your script, you can replace xterm with strace xterm and compare with the above. some links: ...



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