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1

This will help you start the default On-Screen keyboard,hence there wont be any effort to create one. Process.Start(Environment.GetFolderPath(Environment.SpecialFolder.System) + Path.DirectorySeparatorChar + "osk.exe"); or just give : Process.Start("C:\\Windows\\System32\\osk.exe"); or Process.Start("osk.exe"); Not : if platform is 64 bit debug in ...


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You can just write a behavior: static class ContentControlBehavior { public static readonly DependencyProperty ContentChangedAnimationProperty = DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached( "ContentChangedAnimation", typeof(Storyboard), typeof(ContentControlBehavior), new PropertyMetadata(default(Storyboard), ...


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Perhaps the backslashes in your ImageUrl are confusing things. What ImageUrl are you using? Json might be interpreting the backslash as an escape character, and you might have to encode the ImageUrl using a double backslash.


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The most important model to follow, is to try and maintain a single direction of reference. As soon as two objects talk to each other through explicit types, you now have a bound object set, which can not be easily separated. It's okay for there to be an explicit type reference one direction, and an interface reference back. This is commonly visible in a ...


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You retrieve it from the LaunchActivatedEventArgs.TileId property - see MSDN


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ImageSource does not actually convert from a string at runtime all that well. In fact, you likely have a couple System.Data exceptions indicating that the conversion is failing. What you will usually do here is use an IValueConverter to take your path and make a BitmapImage out of it. Your XAML becomes: <Image Source="{Binding ThumbnailPath, ...


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=> Rename your Xml file to Xaml <UserControl ...> <Grid> <StackPanel Background="Aqua"> <TextBlock Text="{Binding Path=Label}" Width="200" Height="40"/> </StackPanel> </Grid> => This is the class you will be merging with the code-behind if there is public class XamlLoadedType:UserControl, ...


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Added this code: d:DataContext="{d:DesignInstance local:Ball,IsDesignTimeCreatable=True}" And now I can see my green ball at design time! Thanks!


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The DataContext allows the XAML to find an instance the class that it is meant to be binding to. Then, the bindings in XAML allow you to bind to specific properties of said class. There are two separate DataContexts: design time and run time. To set the design time DataContext, see: http://adamprescott.net/2012/09/12/design-time-data-binding-in-wpf/ ...


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By default, the DataContext for a UserControl is not set to point at the code behind. Add this: <UserControl DataContext="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}}">


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Probably a bad DataContext, see ReSharper WPF error: "Cannot resolve symbol "MyVariable" due to unknown DataContext". The answer describes how to use the free Snoop utility to detect runtime binding errors.


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Layout in WPF is heavily depend on the parent container. For example, create a form with labels and input fields, consider using a Grid panel. Controls in WPF by default resize according to the layout behavior of their parent. Here is an example of a window with two labeled text boxes and two buttons that resize along with the window. <Window> ...


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Check out ReSharper WPF error: "Cannot resolve symbol "MyVariable" due to unknown DataContext". At the end of the answer, it shows how to use the free Snoop utility to identify any bad DataContext at runtime.


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I'd personally recommend subscribing to something like PluralSight or Lynda. You learn 80% of what you do, but far less of what you read in a book. Open up Visual Studio, and follow along with the tutorial video, typing into Visual Studio. Pause if the tutor gets ahead of you. You need a lot of foundational knowledge, and this is the perfect way to get ...


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Set HorizontalAlignment to Stretch, and don't set the Width <Grid> <TextBox HorizontalAlignment="Stretch" Margin="5,0,0,5" TextWrapping="Wrap" AcceptsReturn="True" Height="70" /> </Grid>


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In WPF you typically place TextBox control within layout Grid control and set the ColumnDefinition Width property of that Grid cell to some relative value "*", so it will resize with the Window. Do NOT use a fixed Width="500" as per your sample: also, remove that "HorizontalAlignment="Left" (the default value is HorizontalAlignment="Stretch", so you can just ...


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As per the documentation from telerik you need to throw an exception in your set statement. set { if (_phoneNumber!= value) { // Do the validation and throw an validation exception. if(/*validation statements*/) { throw new ValidationException("........Error message.........."); } _phoneNumber = ...


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You can implement WPF TextBox control (e.g. TextBox1) event subscription in two different ways as shown below in following sample code snippets: Using C# Lambda-expression (shortest code syntax): TextBox1.PreviewKeyDown += (s, e) => { //YOUR CODE}; More traditional way (longer syntax): TextBox1.PreviewMouseDown += (s, e) => ...


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You need to group items in viewmodel, and databind ItemsSource to the groups. In flipview's itemtemplate you display items in group. public class PageGroup : PageBase { public ObservableColection<BaseClass> Items { get; set; } } public ObservableCollection<PageBase> Pages { get; set; } <FlipView ItemsSource="{Binding Pages}"> ...


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Ha, found it! Rewriting the LINQ query as a loop, I could cast paths to Path, and use path.Data.Bounds.Right as the right edge of that element.** I might be able to convert the code back to a LINQ query now that I know what I want to do (I always find them more readable than stateful loops...). I found this when I, after having perused the link provided by ...


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You should use a grid instade the stackpanel. Try something like this: <Button > <Grid> <Image Source="..." Stretch="None" /> <TextBlock Text="test" VerticalAlignment="Center" HorizontalAlignment="Center"/> </Grid> </Button>


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You can maka a reusable generic base class. This way you can select rows both from code and UI. This is my example class i want to be selectable public class MyClass { public string MyString {get; set;} } Make generic base class for selectable classes. INotifyPropertyChanged makes the UI update when you set IsSelected. public class ...


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Try using the WriteableBitmapEx library https://writeablebitmapex.codeplex.com/ for image cropping.


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You might try to use converters.Simply use IValueConverter and HttpClient to check if file exists in internet.If HttpClient fails , return your local image URL.


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Does ContentPage have HorizontalContentAlignment and VerticalContentAlignment properties ? I'm not %100 sure but in the style template you might find some content alignment properties.Try setting them to Stretch.


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I was starting a new project and having this issue. None of the solutions listed here worked for me, including removing the suo file, unloading/reloading the project, restarting VS, etc. What worked for me was, because this was a new project, I had not yet built it. I removed the Window.DataContext element to the clipboard, built the project once ...


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Yes it happens when you put the groups in the Page instead inside the first control. Try put inside: <Grid...> <VisualStateManager.VisualStateGroups> </Grid> Apart if you want to make more complex adaptative triggers I made an article here: codeproject advanced view states


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If you really don't want to use MVVM, you can name your Grid and then swap out the controls from your code behind: <Grid Name="YourGrid" Background="Black"> ... </Grid> Then in code behind: // Repeat as necessary YourGrid.Children.RemoveAt(indexOfControlToRemove); SW2 sw2 = new SW2(); sw2.SetValue(Grid.RowProperty, 1); ...


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Have you tried setting a name (x:Name="userControl") on your usercontrol and changed the binding to Text="{Binding Path=Alert, ElementName=userControl}"?


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A basic example with animation could look like this: <Grid> <Rectangle Fill="Black" Width="100" Height="100" RenderTransformOrigin=".5,.5"> <Rectangle.RenderTransform> <RotateTransform x:Name="rotation"/> </Rectangle.RenderTransform> </Rectangle> <Button Content="Rotate" ...


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If you are running the database search off the UI thread (in other words, the method is being called due to a button click or other GUI control event), it will make the GUI unresponsive and not update properly while the UI thread is occupied with the database search. The database search should be moved to a background thread like Dennis suggested and, if ...


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Hi you could use IValueConverter in your program. Base on the value of status the Convert method of IValueConverter interface could return which ever image you wish to show. https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/apps/windows.ui.xaml.data.ivalueconverter


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The attached behavior or attached property can be implemented for the DataGrid control to implement described behavior and follow the MVVM pattern at the same time. For example, when the attached property is set, its property changed handler is called — at the moment the subscription to DataGrid control and its row-related events can be done to handle the ...


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Depending on the use case (like showing images in a GridView where you know the destination image size), another option is to always show a default image and then if and when the correct image is downloaded, it will show on top of the default image. Just list two images and the second one will show on top of the first. <Grid> <Image ...


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In design mode you have a default debug window height and width defined in the windows Xaml. When running, the program's window size may/may not be the size defaulted to during design. Controls are simply filling up the extra space... If you can shrink the runtime window till the size in runtime mode appears the same as design, that means you have controls ...


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You are binding to an ObservableCollection<T>. If you don't tell the binding engine what property to bind to in T, it will call .ToString() on the T class and place the results in a TextBlock. Let's say you have a class, Trip public class Trip { public string TripName { get; set; } public string Description { get; set; } public DateTime ...


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You need to override the ItemTemplate. E.g. <ComboBox ItemsSource="{Binding MyItems}"> <ComboBox.ItemTemplate> <DataTemplate> <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal"> <Rectangle Fill="{Binding Name}" Width="16" Height="16" Margin="0,2,5,2" /> ...


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This link states there is a Image.ImageFailed event. You can set another source in its handler. Alternatively, you can check the internet connection in your viewmodel code and set Picture value to something like "ms-appx:///Assets/image_name.png"


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One quick way is to subscribe to the ImageFailed event: <Image Source="{Binding Picture}" ImageFailed="ImageFailed" /> Then, in the event handler, change the Source property to your local picture: private void ImageFailed(object sender, ExceptionRoutedEventArgs e) { ((Image)sender).Source = new BitmapImage(new ...


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I suggest using an ItemsControl with Data Templates. ItemsControl Class


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Your DataContext is pointed at the wrong level of your model. Here's a possible solution <Grid> <Border Visibility="{Binding AreAccoutsVisible, Converter={StaticResource BooleanToVisibilityConverter}}"> <local:AccountListControl DataContext="{Binding AccountListVm}"/> </Border> <TextBlock Text="{Binding ...


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You could try something like this.. <ScrollViewer> <TextBlock> </TextBlock> </ScrollViewer>


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IsChecked="{Binding IsOpen, ElementName=LegendPopup, mode=OneWayToSource}" IsChecked="{Binding IsOpen, ElementName=LegendPopup, Mode=TwoWay}" if I'm correct these are the culprit.. It's actually changing the IsChecked value two times at once..


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The best tip i can give you if you're starting WPF and you want to know which control can go where is that you should develop directly in Visual studio because you'll have the intellisense that will tell you which block can go where. About your first question, In this case, the "Items" you're talking about is a property, properties cannot be used like this, ...


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You can overlay multiple Lines, Polylines or Polygons to achieve similar effects and use resources to avoid duplication, for example (just inspiration): <Canvas ClipToBounds="True" Height="200" Width="200"> <Canvas.Resources> <PointCollection x:Key="Wings">0,-2 62,-2 62,22 58,22 58,2 0,2</PointCollection> ...


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Add the Style on your App.xaml, it should work


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I'm new to WPF, Caliburn Micro and I've never used Conductor<T>.Collection.AllActivein real application but I've tried it a bit. When you add it to Items that is screen collection, All of it are activated. If you want do Deactivate it, you can simply use DeactivateItem(T item, bool close) method that take item you are conducting and bool indicate that ...


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You use the CommandParameter Dependency Property in order to pass a parameter in. <Button Content="Show The Message" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="833,242,0,0" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="273" Height="69" Background="#FFE07031" DataContext="{StaticResource Commands}" CommandParameter"Show the message" Command="{Binding ...


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In your code-behind, you could set the IsEnabled value to false for your ViewModel. I know you said you didn't want to set visibility to false, but you could set the visbility to Collapsed. This solution would completely hide it from your output. When you want to do it in code behind, you need to do : yourObject.Visibility = Visibility.Collapsed;


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Your question seems to be missing some information but normally when you want to set an image with code behind, you can simply do it like this: <Image Name="ModifiedImage" Initialized="ModifiedImage_Initialized"/> code-behind: private void ModifiedImage_Initialized(object sender, EventArgs e) { BitmapImage img = new ...



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