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Your XAML is mostly fine. All you really need to do is to set the ListBox.HorizontalContentAlignment property to "Stretch". This basically forces each item in the collection to stretch to fill with entire Width of the related ListBoxItem. However, you could improve this further by setting the Grid.IsSharedSizeScope Attached Property to True. Setting this in ...


0

I've got the solution now and its pretty simple. Add a ListBox inside the ItemTemplate of another ListBox like this... (You can copy/paste the code below in your XAML.) <ListBox x:Name="myListBox" Margin="0,-28,-22,0" ItemsSource="{Binding Items}" SelectionChanged="myListBox_SelectionChanged"> <ListBox.ItemTemplate> ...


-1

try this, <ListBox x:Name="lbFieldsreq" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Height="100" Margin="236,232,0,0" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="223"> <ListBox.ItemTemplate> <DataTemplate> <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal"> <StackPanel.Resources> <Style ...


1

I guess execution flow is based on XAML Parser, and in parse properties as they appear. So you can try to reorder declarations of properties. Something like this: <LinearGradientBrush> <GradientStop Color="Black" Offset="0"/> <GradientStop Color="White" Offset="1"/> ...


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It's a WPF control, so yes. You have two options, either you play around with the control's style, to make it look slightly different, changes brushes, etc ... Or you modify its control template, to completely reorganise it.


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Declare the variable index as a public property , so that it can be accessed by all the members of page1 class . public int index { get; set; } Next , use this logic to retrieve the index of the selected object : protected override void OnNavigatedTo(NavigationEventArgs e) { if (DataContext == null) { string selectedIndex ...


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You could apply ElementStyle on the DataGridTextColumn that has TextBlock and right align that, it would work. <DataGrid x:Name="dgrid" Margin="10,31,10,-233" IsReadOnly="True" AutoGenerateColumns="False" CanUserAddRows="False" TextBlock.TextAlignment="Center" Height="627" VerticalAlignment="Top" HorizontalGridLinesBrush="#FFF5FAF7" ...


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In Visual Studio 2013 Ultimate Update 3 RC; You can switch between XAML & Design View using SHIFT + F7; Hope this helps.


0

I was able to accomplish what I wanted to accomplish with the below changes: public class Region : Behavior<ContentControl> { public static readonly DependencyProperty DefaultViewTypeProperty = DependencyProperty.Register( "DefaultViewType", typeof(Type), typeof(Region), new ...


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The only way to change font color is make text as your background image. You can do like this: put textBlock in a grid, change font color. Render this grid to an image. then save it to storage. and set it as background image of tile.


1

You need to bind the command to all the child items, now you bind it on the parent which will ignore it because it has child items (opens sub-menu instead). To bind it on the children you need the ItemContainerStyle, create a Setter for the Command there. You will need to walk up again, probably this: {Binding DataContext.DataContext.UpdateCommand, ...


0

For setting the size of layout controls like Grid, StackPanel or Canvas use the parent actual size, size or parent favorite property. In this example, I have a ScrollViewer defined in XAML as parent so: Grid mygrid = new Grid(); mygrid.Width = 300; mygrid.Height = myScrollViewer.ActualHeight; It behaves like setting the height of mygrid to Auto


0

You can define a resource within your XAML file and bind to that... <UserControl.Resources> <System:Double x:Key="AngleResource">-3</System:Double> </UserControl.Resources> Then bind to it... <StackPanel> <StackPanel.RenderTransform> <TransformGroup> ...


0

Spotted the problem, I'm supposed to be setting the Symbol property of a SymbolIcon with the DependencyProperty. So it should be returning a Symbol enumeration. public NcButton() { this.DefaultStyleKey = typeof(NcButton); } // you can get help for these properties using the propdp code snippet in C# and Visual Basic public ...


1

You create this like any other DLL in .NET: Create a "Library" project. There is a "User Control Library" in some versions of WPF, so you might as well use it, but I believe a standard "Class Library" will work just as well Add a "UserControl" to your library. Make sure it is marked public! From the project that will use this DLL, add a reference to the ...


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You're using Zumero along with SQLite-Net (a popular C# ORM layer over SQLite), so you should not call the SQLite-Net CreateTable<>() method. When CreateTable is called in an empty database, SQLite-Net will generate and execute the SQL CREATE TABLE command. Unfortunately, this is in direct conflict with Zumero, which expects that on the initial sync, ...


0

Try this: XAML: <StackPanel x:Name="stack"> <ListBox x:Name="lst"> <ListBox.ItemTemplate> <DataTemplate> <TextBlock Text="{Binding Str}"/> </DataTemplate> </ListBox.ItemTemplate> </ListBox> <Button ...


0

do it in code, if you dont want to create objects List<string> myList = new List<string>(); //fill your list here foreach (string sItem in myList) { ListBox1.Items.Add(sItem) }


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An unsatisfying solution is to move GradientStop collection somewhere, to allow have an order of elements in xaml (to execute behavior last) <GradientStopCollection x:Key="SomeKey"> <GradientStop Color="Black" Offset="0"/> <GradientStop Color="White" Offset="1"/> </GradientStopCollection> <LinearGradientBrush ...


1

List<HistoryEntry> urls = new List<HistoryEntry>(); public MainPage() { InitializeComponent(); } private void WebBrowser_Navigated(object sender, NavigationEventArgs e) { string url = Convert.ToString(e.Uri).Remove(0, 11); HistoryEntry urlObj = new HistoryEntry(); ...


1

There are a few things wrong. First ContentPresenter does not have a Background property. You might set the Background of the Border control instead. Second, Background is of type Brush, but a ColorAnmation animates a Color, so you should change the property path to Background.Color. Third (for completeness), you should explicitly assign a SolidColorBrush ...


0

The Unity MonoBehaviour class is not a WPF Window base class and is therefore not appropriate to use as the base class for your Window2 class. It could however be a property of that class (assuming you can instantiate it). C# code: using UnityEngine; using System.Collections; namespace WpfApplication5 { public partial class Window2 : Window { ...


0

Try using the following code instead: <ControlTemplate.Triggers> <EventTrigger RoutedEvent="MouseEnter"> <BeginStoryboard> <Storyboard> <ColorAnimation From="#6d6e6e" To="#b2b2b2" Duration="0:0:1" Storyboard.TargetName="ScanButton" ...


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Try this <Window.Resources> <Style x:Key="FadeOutButton" TargetType="{x:Type Button}"> <Style.Resources> <Storyboard x:Key="MouseOverAnimation" > <DoubleAnimation Duration="0:0:1" To="1" Storyboard.TargetProperty="Opacity"/> </Storyboard> <Storyboard ...


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Firstly, you should never use DataContext = this; in any UserControl in a serious WPF Application. Secondly, you should look up the MVVM design pattern, which provides the idea of a view model for each view. Your Window or UserControl are the 'Views' and your view models are simply classes that contain all of the data properties that you need to display in ...


1

The conversion isn't necessary at all. Change the type of your VideoImage property to ImageSource or BitmapSource. Now you directly pass it as parameter to DrawImage: this.VideoImage = bitmapsource; drawingContext.DrawImage(this.VideoImage, new Rect(0, 0, imageWidth, imageHeight));


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Call me crazy, but I've actually reimplemented standard Aero checkbox in pure XAML. If you want to customize Aero checkbox, it's a good starting point. You can find other styles in my repository on GitHub (specific commit, in case files are moved). BulletCommon.xaml (common resources for CheckBox and RadioButton) <ResourceDictionary ...


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the x:Class attribute has the wrong value. the x:Class attribute specifies the codebehind class that should be merged with the XAML code. you specified the MonoBehavior class in XAML. It should have been Window2. Window2 does contain the event declaration & that does not need to be public. you can tell from the error message. after merging the files, ...


0

Not a built-in functionality in xaml...but this would do the trick. At first you put the local image location as a value in image property. Then you need to have a Image downloaded completed event so that you can detect when Image is successfully downloaded from remote location. Inside this event you can replace Image property value so that it changes the ...


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This is the simplest way to achieve what you desire; <Grid> <Image Source="YourLocalImage" /> <Image Source="{Binding Image}" /> </Grid> So, in your app until your URL image is loaded, your local image will be visible & once your URL image is loaded, that will be visible. See, if this helps.


2

Look at this part of userHistory: public List<userHistory> lstUserHistory { get; set; } public userHistory(string timedate, string url) { lstUserHistory.Add(new userHistory(timedate, url)); } There are two bugs here: The constructor calls itself (boom! stack overflow) The constructor calls lstUserHistory.Add when lstUserHistory is definitely ...


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This post might be of interest. It points to this reference which I think describes a similar issue to what you are describing. Basically the first window that is opened is considered the main window of the application. I would suggest that you should leave your MainWindow as the default and open your login window in the Loaded event of the MainWindow - ...


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It´s because the ShutDown-Property of your application is usually set to "OnLastWindowClose". So, you have to instantiate your MainWindow before your Login-Window is closed or change the Shutdown-Property.


0

I figured it out myself. At the beginning of the project I wanted to use Calibri system-wide. In generic.xaml there's this: <FontFamily x:Key="ContentControlThemeFontFamily">Segoe UI</FontFamily> <FontFamily x:Key="SettingsFlyoutHeaderThemeFontFamily">Segoe UI</FontFamily> <FontFamily x:Key="SymbolThemeFontFamily">Segoe UI ...


0

you are stuck at Y property of a Point you may not be able to bind it as it is not a dependency property so that approach may not help you I did try to achieve the same based on your comments. <Grid Background="#DDD" xmlns:l="clr-namespace:CSharpWPF"> <Grid.Resources> <XmlDataProvider x:Key="TestData" ...


1

It's better if you would have the data you're going to display within a Listbox, I mean the Url's. So that you could easily get whatever the data you want from the clicked item. Make sure that you bind the source for your Listbox. your xaml: <ListBox ItemsSource="{Binding Item}" Foreground="RoyalBlue" Height="395" HorizontalAlignment="Center" ...


0

As per my understanding you can't use x:Uid if the resources are maintained in a .resx file. if you use .resw files you can access the strings whatever the assembly they are residing in. they can be accessed as you mentioned in your question like this "ResourcesLibrary/Resources/ResourceTest"


0

Do your trick in the converter. <Rectangle x:Name="Card01" Fill="{Binding GameBoard.CardList Converter={StaticResource CardConverter} ConverterParameter = 0}" ... />


0

here you go Instead of hard coding for card you can leverage ItemsControl and specify a data template for the card's appearance and behavior <ItemsControl ItemsSource="{Binding GameBoard.CardList}"> <ItemsControl.ItemTemplate> <DataTemplate> <Rectangle Fill="{Binding Value,Converter={StaticResource ...


0

If you have list of cards in your viewmodel then probably you have to somehow show them all in your view? It seems no sense to get them one by one with indexers. then you maybe should use something like: <ItemsControl ItemsSource="{Binding CardList}"> <ItemsControl.ItemTemplate> <DataTemplate> <Rectangle ...


0

You should return some brush object than colors to background like below public class StaffNameToBackgroundColourConverter : IValueConverter { public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture) { var staff = (Staff)value; if (staff.Forename == "Donald" && staff.Surname == "Duck") { ...


0

You are binding to an observable collection. You can not tunnel down to a single object in that collection with a binding like that. private Foo _MyData; public Foo MyData { get { if(Data != null) { _Data = GetData(); } return _Data; } This would allow you to do the binding as you currently have it in xaml. If you are trying to ...


0

I think the problem is that your textblock i too deep in xaml code. I think Data Binding should be enough in this situation but there is a way to go around this problem. You have to subscribe this element to some event(like Loaded) and save sender to some property in code behind: <TextBlock Loaded="LastName_Loaded" Grid.Row="0" Name="LastName" ...


1

What you can do is handle the KeyDown event like this: private void SomeTextBox_KeyDown(object sender, KeyEventArgs e) { if(e.Key == Key.Enter) { this.Focus(); // dismiss the keyboard // Call the submit method here } } NOTE: AcceptsReturn means that when Return/Enter is pressed on the keyboard, it will add a newline/Return ...


1

You can pass Name using RelativeSource markup extension: CommandParameter="{Binding Name, RelativeSource={RelativeSource Mode=FindAncestor, AncestorType=Rectangle}}"


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You need to provide assembly name for namespaces which resides in different assemblies. Declare namespace like this: xmlns:interactivity="clr-namespace:System.Windows.Interactivity;assembly=System.Windows.Interactivity"


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This is the correct namespace for interactivity within XAML: xmlns:i="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/2010/interactivity"


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Why is it clipping before rendering? It's not. As you can see from here: Your Ellipse is rendered perfectly. The ClipToBounds="True" is what ruins is as you can see from your Canvas: How to i fix that, while keeping clipping? This is quite a broad question. Your problem comes from the fact you are putting your Ellipse outside the Canvas ...


0

please have a look at below snippet and help for yourself. <Window x:Class="WpfApplication1.MainWindow" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" xmlns:local="clr-namespace:WpfApplication1" Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525"> ...


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You are using the MenuItem control incorrectly. To create submenus, you would do something like the following: <!-- Top level menu --> <MenuItem> <!-- Level 1 menu --> <MenuItem> <!-- Level 2 menus --> <MenuItem /> <MenuItem /> <MenuItem /> </MenuItem> ...



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