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Did you solve it? I have similar situation. My solution is: 1) Find scrollview of ListView adn disable scrolling. After that i can handle events like pointermove ... 2) Register GestureRecognizer and handle swipe 3) On vertical move manual scroll listview This worked fine, but problem is, that manualy scrolling is not so great asi original. Is slowly, and ...


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This would require a mechanism by which you raise the PropertyChanged event in OuterVm. One simple option would be to just subscribe to the events and pass them through: class OuterVm : Notifiable { public OuterVm() { // initialize _collection _collection.PropertyChanged += (o,e) => { if (e.PropertyName == ...


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Recursion string fetchContentString(object o) { if (o == null) { return null; } if(o is string) { return o.ToString(); } if(o is ContentControl) { var cc = o as ContentControl; if ...


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You should be binding the Uri not an Image. public class DisplayData { public string Name { get; set; } public string Value { get; set; } public Uri Image { get; set; } } Your loop would then look like for (int i = 0; i < bla.Count - 1; i++) { DisplayData data = new DisplayData(); data.Name = bla[i].title; ...


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That's the tricky part if you do the do-it-yourself MVVM. Your options, basically: Use Dependency Injection You could inject the ViewModel in your Page/Window's constructor and assign it within it. This has a few downsides though. harder to use design-time view models Views can't be instantiated from XAML anymore ViewModel First with Navigation ...


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The following works for me. The GridSplitter is shown when expanded and hidden when collapsed. I use ellipses that fill the panes in the example, because that makes it easy to see how much space is taken by each panel. Xaml <Grid Background="Green"> <Grid.RowDefinitions> <RowDefinition Height="*" /> <RowDefinition ...


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I think the above has been depreceated. Exit is now an event. Try Application.Current.Terminate();


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You certainly want to use Windows.UI.Xaml.Media.Imaging.BitmapImage, not System.Windows.Media.Imaging.BitmapImage. The former is part of the Windows Runtime API for Windows Store or Windows Phone Apps, whereas the latter is WPF. You can't use WPF in a Windows Store or Windows Phone App.


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You can use a converter to do the work. refer the below code. I have two style to make the + symbol in red color or black color in Icon.xaml. <ResourceDictionary xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"> <Canvas x:Key="appbar_add_Black" Width="76" ...


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Define resources based on screen revolution. In design mode, using dynamic key to avoid errors. In runtime, dynamically add resources into App.


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I have two ideas for doing this: Using a binding converter, and bind the width/height of each item to the container width/height. Creating a custom panel, with de desired layout. Only a few ideas, hope helps.


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You can throw pretty much anything you want on there and just bind to the MapControl.Location attached property for the object placement as long as they're children of a map parent. See more detail explanation here in the docs.


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I expect that there is something going wrong in code that you haven't posted. I wrote up a solution with very similar behavior using the provided code and there was no case where values[1] == null unless I removed the ComboBox.SelectedItem binding. Here is the working sample.


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Override Equals because it's likely your item isn't actually the same actual instance as the one in your items collection, so the binding doesn't work. Snoop will show the same values, so you may think its the same, when it really isn't. Put this in your class defining the object, replacing MyClasswith your class type etc. public override bool ...


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Stupid of me. I had the Map property isEnabled set to false. Which is confusing because all the Map gestures work, but none of the binded XAML controls on top of it not. Stupid mistake but nonetheless it might help people.


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Have you considered using a ValueConverter and handling the nullable within the ValueConverter scope?


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In App resources, override the following the properties: <x:Double x:Key="TextControlBackgroundThemeOpacity">1.0</x:Double> <x:Double x:Key="TextControlBorderThemeOpacity">1.0</x:Double>


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Within the RenderTransform block I would add a scaleTransform <Style x:Key="HorizontalSliderThumbStyle" TargetType="{x:Type Thumb}"> ..... ..... <ControlTemplate TargetType="{x:Type Thumb}"> <Canvas x:Name="canvas" SnapsToDevicePixels="true"> <Canvas.RenderTransform> ...


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I have solved this issue by setting items styles to null which gets rid of my previous style. I have placed these in a resource file and referenced it inside my form. Here's what I have made Inside form <Window.Resources> <ResourceDictionary Source="Resources/NullStyles.xaml"> </ResourceDictionary> ...


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I got a few good ideas from the DataTemplateSelector, but I ended up with a style with data trigger: <Style TargetType="{x:Type StackPanel}" x:Key="stackPanelStyle"> <Style.Triggers> <DataTrigger Binding="{Binding Path=AppendMode}" Value="True"> <Setter Property="ContextMenu" Value="{DynamicResource ...


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What you have presented should work as you expect it to. But: I would strongly recommend that you use some MVVM framework (like mvvmlight and there are other out there) and bindings in you application. If you invest some time to understand the concepts behind your life will become easier later. Invest some time and understand platform specifics what you ...


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ResourceLoader loader = new ResourceLoader(); private void ChangeTitle() { if (something) Exemples.Text = loader.GetString("MyTextInResources1"); else Exemples.Text = loader.GetString("MyTextInResources2"); } and in your resources file donot add .Text to your string, it is only added for xaml controls. so in your resources file ...


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MessageDialog md=new MessageDialog("my message"); await md.showAsync(); If you want to create a custom messge dialog then you would have to create your own custom control. You could easily add styles to your custom dialog whenever required.


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found the solution ! <ListView ...> <ListView.ItemContainerStyle> <Style TargetType="ListViewItem"> <Setter Property="VerticalContentAlignment" Value="Top" /> </Style> </ListView.ItemContainerStyle> ......... </ListView>


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<DataTrigger Binding="{Binding ToolDataContext.ItemInstance.IsToShow, Mode=TwoWay, UpdateSourceTrigger=PropertyChanged}" Value="True"> Assuming that you have assigned the datacontext, you need to add UpdateSourceTrigger=PropertyChanged


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Try adding Path to your data trigger binding <DataTrigger Binding="{Binding Path=ToolDataContext.ItemInstance.IsToShow, Mode=TwoWay}" Value="True">


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I found an excellent explanation at http://www.wpftutorial.net/DrawOnPhysicalDevicePixels.html


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Try remove the stackpanel & set the Height to Auto <ScrollViewer x:Name="scrollViewer" > <Grid > <Grid.RowDefinitions> <RowDefinition Height="Auto"/> <RowDefinition Height="*"/> </Grid.RowDefinitions> <TextBlock Grid.Row="0" x:Name="title" MaxLines="1" ...


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I dunno why you specifically want to handle the scenario using XAML. For the Microsoft's recommended MVVM model you should bind a property to your element field and then you can write a converter for the same to return back "Visible" or "Collapse".


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The flaw in your code (except the fact that it's probably nearly instant anyway, as notes @kennyzx), is that you need the LevelTap method to return for the UI to be updated. And when the method returns, you've already set the ProgressRing.IsActive property back to false, which means nothing is displayed at all. One simple way to fix that is to use the async ...


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try WPF: <Window x:Class="WpfApplication1.MainWindow" x:Name="thisForm" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"> <ListView x:Name="f_List"> <ListView.ItemTemplate> <DataTemplate> <Expander Header="{Binding ...


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The DataContext of a DataTemplate (and all its children, such as your Button) is the ItemsSource of the actual ListBox. If the command is defined within the DataContext of the window, then use either ElementName or RelativeSource: <Window x:Name="MyWindow" ... > <ListBox ItemsSource="..."> <ListBox.ItemTemplate> ...


1

Try referring the datacontext of the ListBox using "ElementName" and "DataContext.OnButtonClickedCommand" <ListBox x:Name ="CategoryListBox" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Height="425" Margin="75,140,0,0" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="105" ItemsSource="{Binding CategoryButtonList}" ItemTemplate="{StaticResource foodTypeTemplate}" > ...


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XAML loaded through XamlReader has some restrictions compared to normal compiled XAML files, including not depending on code-behind, since it is just parsing rather than compiling. In your case the Window you're trying to use has the usual x:Class attribute which specifies its code-behind component. If you're just using it to load some properties you should ...


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Ok, answering my own question (was going to delete, but instead will leave it incase it helps someone else out). It seems that using tableadapter's is the wrong approach these days. I'm sure it works just fine in VS2012 / EF5 and earlier (no idea - haven't tested), but I just couldn't get the darn thing working properly in VS2013+ & EF6+, probably due ...


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This can be handled by binding to a view object with a little logic added. In your WPF bind the IsExpanded property to the EmailExpanded and CustomerExpanded properties of the view. <Grid> <Grid.ColumnDefinitions> <ColumnDefinition Width="1*"/> <ColumnDefinition Width="1*"/> </Grid.ColumnDefinitions> ...


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Here is a generic Converter that I used public class ObservableCollectionConverter: IValueConverter { public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture) { var observableType= typeof (ObservableCollection<>).MakeGenericType(value.GetType().GetGenericArguments()); return ...


2

try this (replace your own font symbol in TextBlock Text) <Grid> <Ellipse Stroke="Red" Fill="Red" StrokeThickness="5"> </Ellipse> <TextBlock Text="&#xf001;" VerticalAlignment="Center" HorizontalAlignment="Center"> </TextBlock> </Grid>


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Ok, I've resolved my problem but no1 would ever guess what was wrong. Visual have some bug that if i turn maximum performance mode on my laptop. It doesn't work but if im turning avarage usage mode it's working. Ridiculous situation... I would've never guessed it but my friend has the same problem he'was trying to repair it for 4 days.


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I'd keep any custom Control logic inside the Control itself. Remember the generic.xaml is used only to define the look of the Control which makes it easier to theme. The style you define in the generic.xaml could easily be overridden.


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I find the problem. I just use my key like "Mytitle_1" or "Mytitle_1.Text". All I needed is that : private string GetResources(string key) { ResourceLoader rl = ResourceLoader("../Resources"); string resources = rl.GetString(key); return resources; } private void ChangeTitle() { if (something) Exemples.Text = ...


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I didn't test, but I think you are missing one detail, and doing a little mistake. First: you need to bind a List to a ListBox. So, I believe you should do something like this: List<podatak> myList = new List<podatak>(); for (int i = 1; i < datum.Count; ++i) { podatak _podatak = new podatak(); _podatak.naslov = naslovi[i]; ...


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It might be because of a little error :) In the Storyboard you have written: " side_scan_strip" while it should be "side_scan_strip". See the little space in the beginning of the first? I think that is what is triggering the exception.


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This is a known problem with XAML-Code. There is something strange during parsing the XAML-Code because VisualStudio knows, that the corresponding DLL is used. For my case it helped to create an Attribute of any object from the specific DLL in the code behind class or any class in the project. (Workaround) For example: // This is only for the build ...


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I made a custom example which matches your scenario, take a look at this. MainWindow.xaml <Window x:Class="SO.MainWindow" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525"> <Grid> <TextBlock ...


1

To answer your question you can do something like this <StackPanel> <TextBlock Name="Block" Text="Test" /> <Button Name="btn"> <Button.Triggers> <EventTrigger SourceName="btn" RoutedEvent="Button.Click"> <BeginStoryboard> <Storyboard> ...


1

Minus setting up your datacontext, if you are trying to bind context menu items to a parent control's datacontext, you have to use the PlacementTarget.Tag trick. This is because the context menu is on a different visual tree. You also don't need the Header in <TextBlock Text="{Binding Header}", leave it as <TextBlock Text="{Binding}" <Grid ...


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I needed to unblock the dll because it came from another computer http://blogs.msdn.com/b/delay/p/unblockingdownloadedfile.aspx the example is a zip but it applies the same for dlls


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Keep a property AllItems in the view model. On the button click, a method in the view model can be invoked to do the filtering. public void Filter(type filterType) { MenuItems.Clear(); foreach(var item in AllItems) { if(item.type == filterType) { MenuItems.Add(item); } } } The changes will be reflected in the ...


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So I came up with a somewhat elegant solution, even though extremely limited (it will only be usable if your custom headers only are meant to contain 2 text elements, if you want more, this won't work, although it doesn't seem impossible to replace a TextBlock by a Image; but yeah, 2 elements). I just added a HeaderTemplate setter in the TabItem's Style, ...



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