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19

Xbox 360 development is largely split into two distinct sections: XNA Development This involves using the XNA Framework to develop games/applications, and is done through AppHub. You can find the tools for development (XNA Game Studio) here. Anything developed using these tools must be written in C#.NET and can only be released onto the Xbox LIVE ...


13

xWinForms is easily the most complete and actively maintained GUI system for XNA. Window System for XNA (WSX) had some good progress in the past (I was working on it for a while), and is still a decent system, though it hasn't been maintained for over a year now. The best option is definitely to go with xWinForms, at least until WPF interoperability comes ...


13

12 is the right age to start - most of the good programmers I know started out young. I look out for it on CVs when hiring. I started on a Spectrum 128k writing in BASIC. A fully fledged game is a lofty goal, a worthy one, but one a fully fledged professional would struggle to attain. I'd start with a simple game - a Tetris or Breakout clone, or maybe ...


12

In the desktop environment garbage is effectively free. There what you want to worry about is how much non-garbage you are producing. Remember how the garbage collector works: it first marks all known objects, then it clears the mark on all live objects and compacts the live objects. The expensive step there is "unmark the live objects". Destroying the ...


10

The root cause of your performance problems is almost certainly because you're allocating memory while your game is running (after startup, during the Draw/Update loop). On Windows this is fine. The garbage collector on Windows is generational (will only clean up new objects when possible) and extremely fast. It is clever about when it chooses to run, too. ...


8

A delegate is itself an object, so if you create a delegate, perhaps for an anonymous method, and give this to some other method to execute, and don't store the delegate for future reference, then yes, that will produce garbage. For instance, this: collection.ForEach(delegate(T item) { // do something with item }); In this case, a new delegate object ...


8

Firstup the SDKs are free, though not publicly available. If you're really keen you can probably find them floating around on torrent sites. They're interesting but of little use without any actual hardware.. So I suspect your real question is "how can I buy development hardware?" Devkits are only available to approved developers and publishers, and cost ...


8

Check out XNA. If you wish to put the game on Xbox Live which you do, you'll have to pay a small fee. About $100/£50 etc... Not too much. If you wish to just play this game yourself on your 360, then you won't have to upload it, though naturally no one else can get at your game. Check out this answer of mine, regarding XNA distribution. Depending on your ...


8

Link to MSFT SDK Update: Just in from ZD.NET "Microsoft readies hobbyist Kinect development kit; promises commercial version later" link Prior Post The makers/OEM of the Kinect is PrimeSense. They make both the kinect and an independent devkit. They recently released open source drivers that are compatible with both XBox's Kinect and the smaller ...


8

It is not all that difficult. As the earlier guy mentioned, you can use the SDL libraries to read the status of the xbox controller and then you can do whatever you'd like with it. There is a SDL tutorial: http://sdl.beuc.net/sdl.wiki/Handling_Joysticks which is fairly useful. Note that an Xbox controller has the following: two joysticks: left joystick ...


6

It's not any different than writing platform-independent code in other contexts. Hide platform-specific details (input, window interaction, the main event loop, threading, etc) behind generic interfaces, and test regularly on all the platforms you intend to support. Note that the Cell's threading model is unusual enough that doing threading "generically" ...


6

I don't claim to be an expert on this, but hopefully this can point you in a helpful direction. Is it possible? Yes. You probably already know that the GPU is good at such calculations (hence the question) and you can indeed control the GPU using XNA. Whether or not it will suit your needs is a different matter. To make use of the GPU, you'll presumably ...


6

The first game I ever wrote was a snake game written in Turbo Pascal. I was fiddling around and managed to get (using a series of dots) a line moving across the screen. Once I did that I made the line change direction. I hooked that up to the arrow keys and got excited. Two hours later i'd gotten a different coloured dot as 'food' up on the screen and it ...


6

In my opinion, when you're using C#, why bother with integrating another scripting language? The only good reason I have come up with is when you have data-driven objects (eg: levels/maps) that you want to "script", with a faster edit-test cycle than you could get by just using Visual Studio as your "script editor". But just because you can't use Visual ...


6

The .Net Compact Framework which is what Xbox 360 has, does not support IronPython. There are limitations on the reflection API, which IronPython uses. So it looks like your best option is to learn C# or VB if you are targeting XNA or the .Net framework. However, if you are creating a game from scratch as a regular executable on Xbox (doubtful, I admit), ...


6

It sounds like the garbage collector is causing your jitters. On Xbox it kicks in every time 1MB of data is allocated. The amount of time it takes depends on how many references are in use in your program. Use the XNA Framework Remote Performance Monitor for Xbox 360 to tell if you have a garbage collection problem. Read How to tell if your garbage ...


6

Have you checked out the MSDN XNA input documentation? It doesn't really have examples, but it appears you have the idea of what you do with the inputs. The articles there have all the information on the inputs. All the controller buttons which you can get to through GamePad.GetState(PlayerIndex.One).Buttons The joystick which you can get through ...


5

XNA games must be copied to the 360 using the XNA game launcher. They can not be loaded off a CD/DVD. You can use other libraries on the 360, but they have to be compiled using the XBox's .net libraries. So unless you have access to source code, or are willing to decompile and change all references to framework libraries to Xbox ones and then remove any ...


5

Look into modding. I found QuakeC (how Quake1 mods were made) to be really easy to pick up, and you already have a very rich base of game content to use so that you can focus on gameplay and such. I found it a lot easier to stay interested when you're starting with a fun game and adding your own twist to it, rather than starting out making 3d box demos or ...


5

The correct method for doing this is to call GraphicsDevice.Present() whenever you want to draw the back buffer onto the screen. Now the difficulty here is that the Game class automatically calls Present for you (specifically in Game.EndDraw), which is something you don't want it to do. Fortunately Game provides a number of ways to prevent Present from ...


5

Most of the projects listed here are now out of date. The official thread for this question on the XNA forum is at http://xboxforums.create.msdn.com/forums/t/15274.aspx [link updated] It's been kept up to date over the years by The ZMan.


4

There's a bunch of Game Developer Magazine articles and GDC talks on the subject. In fact, since you mentioned Valve, they delivered a talk describing their approach at GDC08. This is really a huge subject that I could (and have) talk about for hours upon hours, but elevator summary is: Determine which parts of the engine are completely platform-specific ...


4

Well, you could try writing a quick app for a Windows Smartphone, and run it in an emulator. Obviously, this won't work for XNA specific code; but for any runtime libraries that Boo or whatever you're using work on the emulator, they should work on the Xbox. For the XNA code you write yourself, just compile it against the Xbox 360 target.


4

No. You're limited to using the .NET Compact Framework on the XBOX 360. This will not include WPF. In fact, you're limited to the XBOX 360's implementation of the Compact Framework, which is built off the .NET 2.0 Compact Framework. This means that any .NET 3.0/3.5 specific classes will not work. MSDN lists the entire collection of the supported ...


4

If you're developing for Xbox 360, you must be careful with render targets. The Xbox 360 has a special memory (10MB) to hold render targets, including the one used to render on the screen. As long as you don't exceed 10MB, switching from one render target to another has no impact, even with PreserveContents, because all the render targets are stored in this ...


4

What language are ps3 and xbox 360 game written in? They can be written in any language that compiles to machine code supported by those devices; most likely only C and C++. The xbox requires the use of DirectX (Xbox stands for DirectX box), so you'll have to use that as your 3d framework. Are the games written in the same language for both ...


4

Check out SQUID: http://www.ionstar.org/ It's a really clean, fast, and engine independent UI system. I've worked with it extensively and really enjoy using it. The download includes sample code for XNA 3.1, Truevision3D, and SlimDX.


4

Consider [Bruno Silva's solution for integrating the Xbox 360 gamepad with PowerPoint][x]. The first project was for an Office Add-in for Powerpoint, but the base project is a wrapper to allow the gamepad to be used within a Windows or WPF application. It wraps XNA Microsoft.Xna.Framework.Input.GamePad class and provides an interface with events ...


4

No. (For starters - how would you do input on the 360? There's no mouse or touch input!) To demonstrate: If you look at the "Silverlight" version pages on the MSDN you can see icons for "Supported by Silverlight for Windows Phone" and "Supported by Xbox 360". So if I look up part of the core framework, like System.IO.File, I can see which methods are ...


4

It's done on the Xbox. The Kinect only sends a depth map, rgb video and sound, which are processed by Microsoft's algorithms on the Xbox. OpenNI comes with some tools (e.g. NITE) that do skeleton tracking and some gesture recognition for you, if you plan to program for the Kinect.



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