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7

You should definitely store the files in subdirectories. EXT4 and XFS both use efficient lookup methods for file names, but if you ever need to run tools over the directories such as ls or find you will be very glad to have the files in manageable chunks of 1,000 - 10,000 files. The inode number thing is to improve the sequential access performance of the ...


5

It depends on where you're moving the files from. mv WITHIN a single filesystem is atomic, otherwise it must do a copy which is not atomic (followed by a delete of the original file), and is prone to the kind of race condition you mention. FWIW, this is normal POSIX semantics, nothing particular to XFS.


4

Modern filesystems will let you store 10 million files all in the same directory if you like. But tools (ls and its friends) will not work well. I'd recommend putting a single level of directories, a fixed number, perhaps 1,000 directories, and putting the files in there (10,000 files is tolerable to the shell, and "ls"). I've seen systems which create ...


3

Apparently the problem was with calculation of seek offset. It was generating integer overflow. Hence I have to convert everything to __int64 even-though I'm working on 64 bits application. I was thinking compiler might be able to do this for me. __int64 grpNum = 2; __int64 sizeOfBlockGroup = 2043982; __int64 blockSize = 4096; __int64 seekOffSet = ...


3

Try to remount the filesystem: mount -o remount /moint/point If the filesystem is mounted using non-default options then make sure to specify the same options in the remount. This ensures that the remount will actually be a no-op if it succeeds. For example, if the filesystem is mounted with the noatime option, then use this command instead: mount -o ...


3

See man 2 stat for the semantics of mtime and ctime. In practice, the mtime and ctime will be updated in the in-memory copy of the inode and flushed out to disk asynchronously. You can't skip the mtime update in the inode without major kernel hackery and if you really think that a copy from one 32bit counter to another memory location is slowing you down, ...


3

I just started the process of writing a wrapper for XFS in C# for a Wincor Nixdorf Cineo T2000 self-service terminal that will handle the functions for Card Reader, PinPad and Integrated Printer. Currently, I am working for the bank that just bought the terminal, so I have access to the API, the physical device and the documentation (which is the same you ...


2

XFS has no such facility as compression. See also Wikipedia which mentions it in the features box. You would have to provide it on a higher level - or maybe at a lower one, if that exists (not that I am aware of, but one never knows)


2

Your best bet is to use Win32 API directly and not go through the C RunTime. Use CreateFile to open the file and SetFilePointerEx to seek The functions you're calling will end up calling these APIs anyway. In Visual studio you have the CRT code so you can step into _fseeki64 and possibly see where it goes wrong.


2

loading the device in a utility like gparted tells you FS types. for fstab file it's enough, I think, to say only xfs.


2

Quoting Dave Chinner: Linux doesn't support GRIO. It's an Irix only thing, and that required special hardware support for bandwidth reservation, special frame schedulers in the IO path, etc.


2

There are a few reasons you probably want to look at a database (not necessarily MySQL) rather than the file system for this sort of thing: More files in one directory slow things down Although XFS is supposed to be very clever about allocating resources, most filesystems experience degrading performance the more files you have in a single directory. It ...


1

You don't need JavaScript hacks if you want to prevent non-same origin pages from embedding your website. Simply add the following tag to the <head> of your HTML document (example: http://jsfiddle.net/b28CK/show/): <meta http-equiv="X-Frame-Options" content="SAMEORIGIN"> If you're allowed to modify the response headers of your server, you can ...


1

Your steps might work, but if you run into any issues you could wind up with an unbootable system. The modules for the kernel must be built with the same version of compiler as the kernel itself or you'll have trouble. I've been stymied every time I tried to build a module for the kernel that came with the distro because the distribution maintainers ...


1

Race condition would not occure in your case in XFS file system. However XFS allows multiple processes to read and write a file at once by using flexible locking scheme in contrast to Unix file systems single threaded inode lock. XFS tack care of serializing the writes on the same region by multiple processes . XFS uses direct I/O for accessing the ...



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