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The XML document is not namespace-well-formed because the prefix ns0 is not bound to any namespace. This is why it cannot be parsed. It can be bound to a namespace of your choice with an xmlns:ns0 attribute in any tag around its use, like so: <StaffingOrder xmlns="NameSpaceName" xmlns:ns0="http://www.example.com/some/namespace"> <...


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It is (in most cases) a very easy task to build the classes from a XML using VS. Copy the XML string into the clipboard In VS menu EDIT/Special Paste/Paste XML as Classes The XML from your question will be converted to that structure /// <remarks/> [System.SerializableAttribute()] [System.ComponentModel.DesignerCategoryAttribute( "code" )] [System....


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I found the easiest solution using already existing attributes: System.Xml.Serialization.XmlAnyElement System.Xml.Serialization.XmlAnyAttribute Example: public class MyCustomObject { public string classProp1 {get;set;} [XmlAnyElement] public XmlElement[] AdditionalElements {get;set;} [XmlAnyAttribute] public XmlAttribute[] ...


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You can use the UnknownElement event. var xs = new XmlSerializer(typeof(MyCustomObject)); xs.UnknownElement += Xs_UnknownElement; MyCustomObject my; using (var fs = new FileStream("test.xml", FileMode.Open)) my = (MyCustomObject)xs.Deserialize(fs); void Xs_UnknownElement(object sender, XmlElementEventArgs e) { var my = (MyCustomObject)e....


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My first recommendation would be to allow the user to select the type when they enter the input so that you don't have to read the string to find the type. However, if you really, really wanted to, you could do something like this. For the purpose of testing I serialized a class called MyClass. I'm all creative. var input = @"<MyClass xmlns:xsd=""http://...



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