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14

The problem turned out to be rather strange and looked like this psuedo code: stream1 = open first excel stream sheet1 = stream1.sheet // get spreadsheet ready for reading if in verbose mode: stream2 = open second excel stream sheet2 = stream2.sheet count++ while sheet2.get_row say "We have $count records" We discovered that if and only ...


13

Inline::C generates XS and builds the generated module. It does this at run-time, although it caches past builds. Inline::C is possibly easier to use, but there are a few downsides. The first time it runs, it slows down startup, it requires permissions to create files at run-time, and it requires the tools to compile the module. Furthermore, it makes it ...


12

I'm not particularly fond of SWIG and prefer to write the interfacing code myself. Perl comes with a sort of pseudo language called 'XS' for interfacing to C or C++. Unfortunately, in order to use it, you will need to know at least C, Perl, and then learn something about the interpreter API, too. If you already know Perl and C well, it's not such a big step. ...


11

For embedding c in perl, you're looking for XS. Extensive documentation on that can be found in perlxs and perlxstut. As for building perl data structures from C, you will have to use the parts of the perlapi that deal with hashes. Much documentation on XS already explains various bits of that. The important parts you're looking for are newHV and hv_store. ...


11

Thanks for putting me on the right track, guys, it turns out I was seriously overthinking this. They just cut out the magic line and don't create the PV. This is all you need to do in Perl 5.12: REGEXP *rx = re_compile(pattern, flags); SV *regex = newRV((SV*)rx); stash = gv_stashpv("Regexp", 0); sv_bless(regex, stash);


10

Check http://www.swig.org : "SWIG is a software development tool that connects programs written in C and C++ with a variety of high-level programming languages. SWIG is used with different types of languages including common scripting languages such as Perl, PHP, Python, Tcl and Ruby."


9

In perlguts, it says: If you know the name of a scalar variable, you can get a pointer to its SV by using the following: SV* get_sv("package::varname", FALSE);


9

Don't. XS is a mechanism to provide a Perl interface to a C function. Don't call the XS function from the C function (for which you'd use call_sv or the like); call the C function from the XS function. Write your recursive C function and keep it outside of the XS code (before the MODULE = line or in a separate .c). Call it from a thin XS wrapper.


9

Yes! In fact, any language that can be called from C can be used from Perl using XS. Here's a solution to how to do it with an Ada module and ExtUtils::MakeMaker. Setting things up Module tree Let's start by creating a module tree using h2xs: $ h2xs -A -n MyAdaModule Then let's create a subdirectory to hold our Ada files: $ cd MyAdaModule $ mkdir src ...


7

Well, the pattern of "create a template array, do av_make(), then free the template" is not very good -- you'd be much better by simply creating your array with newAV(), av_extend()ing it to the right size, and then doing av_store(newSVnv(...)) for each element. That lets you avoid the intermediate SVtempArray allocations entirely. However, that's not what ...


7

See the Passing Parameters section of perlcall. Arguments are pushed on the Perl stack. call_argv isn't useful for passing anything other than strings. The calling convention would look something like PUSHMARK(SP); mPUSHi(some_integer); mPUSHp(binary_data, len); XPUSHs(some_SV_I_had_laying_around); PUTBACK; call_pv("sub_name", G_DISCARD); or you can use ...


6

skip() is exported from Test::More, which you might have loaded since your executable is named t/tester.pl. What does ref($cursor) yield you? It should be a blessed MyModule::Cursor object, but the "invalid object" error might be suggesting the object was not constructed properly. EDIT: perldiag gives another clue: "in cleanup" signifies that a problem was ...


6

I would normally choose XS, like tsee, but there is also Inline::C (or Inline::CPP in this case). I dislike SWiG and tend to avoid packages built around it.


6

You can't pass a Perl array and have it automagically converted to, say, a C array of ints. You will have to resort to XS and the perlapi to do this. The reason is quite simple: a perl array contains untyped scalars. A C array holds N items of the same type. What you can do is have an XSUB that takes an SV*. SV stands for scalar value. This naturally ...


6

Take a look at the comments in this answer by hobbs. I've copied it below for ease of reading: Regex objects actually get slightly more "core" in 5.12.0, as they're now references to scalars of type REGEXP rather than references to scalars with magic. This is, however, completely invisible to user code, unless you manage to bypass overloaded ...


6

Any solution would have to be on a per module basis (because the decision on which implementation to use is made by the parent module itself, not some mechanism in Perl). In the case you cited, checking the value of $Date::Simple::NoXs after the use statement will tell you if XS is being used or not. use Date::Simple; die "not using XS for Date::Simple\n" ...


6

Perl_croak() is documented here on the perlapi man page. As the example on that page shows, you can either pass it a message string, or you can manually set $@ to an exception object and pass NULL.


6

If you are saying that your only Perl has been upgraded from something other than Perl 5.12.*, and the binary components of your local::lib installations haven't, then sorry no, there is no easy solution to this apart from rebuilding the local::lib modules to your new Perl. Perl XS components are just not viable across major Perl revisions. This is why it ...


6

If you run "make" you should discover the .pm file in the blib/lib/Math directory, and the .so in the blib/arch/auto/Math/FFTW directory.


6

Use INSTALL_BASE.


6

The documentation of ExtUtils::Typemaps::Default clearly says it already includes ExtUtils::Typemaps::STL. If you remove the latter from your extra_typemaps, it should all work.


6

If you don't have root access I would install in ${HOME}/lib. Just make sure that the linker can find it, either the directory should be in you LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment variable, or better point EU::MM to the library and include files. No, the module also have a part in C which has to be compiled. To install Download the distribution tarball: ...


6

In Perl, you'd use re::regexp_pattern. my $re = qr/foo/i; my ($pat, $mods) = re::regexp_pattern($re); say $pat; # foo say $mods; # i As you can see from the source of regexp_pattern, there's no function in the API to obtain that information, so I recommend that you call that function too from XS too. perlcall covers calling Perl functions from C. ...


6

It's a flag that indicates whether a variable has "clear" magic, magic that should be called when the variable is cleared (e.g. when it's destroyed). It's used by mg_clear which is called when one attempts to do something like undef %hash; delete $a[4]; etc It's derived information calculated by mg_magical that should never be touched. mg_magical will be ...


5

Perl 5.12 changed regexps to be first class objects, which you find as part of the tangential discussion in How do I check if a scalar has a compiled regex it in?. I'm not an XS person, so I don't know what you need to change in your code to make it work out. Searching for 'REGEXP' in the perl sources shows the fixes they made to the core modules to use the ...


5

This is a really good feature request. Unfortunately, short of what the module author has programmed, perl has no knowledge if the module has XS or Pure Perl (PP) variants and if the engine was loaded through fallback. This example you bring up is compounded by the effect that they're packaged in the same distro and module, and it is all done internally. ...


5

Ideally, use Module::Build. At configure time (perl Build.PL), detect the platform and header location (but also let the user specify command-line options to override detection), set the relevant extra_compiler_flags and extra_linker_flags in the constructor and then copy the relevant files from e.g. contrib to lib (where they will be automatically picked up ...


5

The XS language is a glue between normal Perl and C. When people want to squeeze every last bit of performance out of an operation, they try to write it as close to the C code as possible. Python and Ruby have similar mechanisms for the same reason. Some Perl modules have an XS implementation to improve performance. However, you need a C compiler to install ...


5

XS can receive a ref to ARRAY as either an AV* or an SV*. The latter would have to be dereferenced to an AV*. use Inline C => DATA; @array = (1 .. 20); $r = sum_of_elements1(\@array); $s = sum_of_elements2(\@array); print "$r $s\n"; # produces output: "210 210\n" __END__ __C__ double sum_of_elements1(AV* array) { int i; double sum = 0.0; for ...


5

CPAN itself is part of the base perl install. It will always be available. If you can't use the cpan shell to talk to the internet and fetch modules, you can at least grab the tarball from the CPAN website, put it on the target machine, untar it, then run $ cpan . from inside the unpacked directory. This will run the CPAN installer for that distribution. ...



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