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3

Makes much more sense to me not to let those sneaky bastards into the database in the first place. Actually - that is not true. The reason that XSS is only handled by blade is that XSS attacks are an output problem. There is no security risk if you store <script>alert('Hacking Sony in 3...2...')</script> in your database - it is just text - it ...


3

Actually you simply cannot make any reliable XSS prevention on the client side. The attacker simply disables JavaScript, and all your complicated code is non-existent. Any client-side validation is only for the convenience of the users, nothing more.


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An iframe is probably currently the best solution. Shadow DOM is a possible answer (in future*). In theory, the outer document will only see the shadow root element, but inside you can put any DOM. In practice, however, shadow DOM is still exposed, just traversed differently. To secure it from inspection, you could override some methods, e.g. ...


1

First of all, the correct way to escape output is htmlentities, not htmlspecialchars. Escape ALL output you get from variables, database or user input. This is pretty much all you have to do to escape XSS attacks. You may also consider using strip_tags where it's appropriate. Here you go: <h5> Editing User ...


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HTML entity encoding is okay for untrusted data that you put in the body of the HTML document, such as inside a tag. It even sort of works for untrusted data that goes into attributes, particularly if you're religious about using quotes around your attributes. But HTML entity encoding doesn't work if you're putting untrusted data inside a tag anywhere, or ...


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First, the password strength. This is important to prevent password guessing or brute force attack. The stronger a password is — the better, of course. You can limit it to minimum 10 characters for example and require digits and upper case characters in it. That's quite strong already, but you can also require the use of symbols like !, $, @, #, etc. That ...


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You should allow any characters in the ASCII character set (although you could allow unicode if you want to take on slightly more complexity, e.g. when using password strength meters). You should set a maximum length of 72 ASCII characters if using bcrypt, as the PHP implementation restricts the hashing to these characters only: Using the PASSWORD_BCRYPT ...


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Yes, try extend class from CI_Security and write new function: protected function _do_never_allowed($str) it will be more OOP way. EDIT: CodeIgniter allow you extend core classes. See this link: Extending CodeIgniter Security.php to enable logging


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It sounds like you actually need two layers of escaping: HTML-escape the content that you want to concatenate into the HTML on the client XML-escape the content that you're inserting into the XML attribute The HTML-escaping should be done on the client (eg, use .text() instead of .html()). The XML-escaping should be done by your XML library (eg, passing ...


1

As far as I know, the "official" Laravel position is that XSS prevention best practice is to escape output. Thus, {{{ }}}. I usually roll my own with Input::all(), strip_tags(), and array_map().


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It should work for making your application very secure, as no user input (besides the user editable $_FILE, $_SERVER) would be susceptible to XSS unless there was a glitch in your library. However, it may adversely affect your servers performance if many people are attempting to access your application. I would write a better function like this: public ...


1

XSS is an output problem, not an input problem. Input validation is about making sure data is correct according to the domain. So for instance you want to check that a field expecting to take a year actually receives a number within the expected range. You may also want to make sure that only allowed characters are in use. And in many cases this will stop ...


1

You should sanitize all output to prevent XSS. Use the htmlentities PHP function for this. Filtering or validation can be done on input, however the focus should always be on output sanitization. For example, on input you may want to validate that a phone number contains numbers and the following characters only ()- #. On output you should always ...


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From OWASP Site Cross-Site History Manipulation (XSHM) is a SOP (Same Origin Policy) security breach. SOP is the most important security concept of modern browsers. SOP means that web pages from different origins by design cannot communicate with each other. Cross-Site History Manipulation breach is based on the fact that client-side browser ...


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Here's the answer I got from Alex Roichman, Chief Software Architect @ Checkmarx: Cross-site history manipulation is a browser same origin policy breach where it’s possible to know a state of a condition from another origin. For example, many sites check if a user was authenticated prior to showing them his private data. This can be done by following code: ...


1

@elsadek suggestion is good. This is a partial answer to your big question. Some of what comes to mind is below but hte list is not enclusive by any means...): 1-Injection (SQL and/or JSON pair injection) 2-Cross site scripting (XSS) 3-Broken Authentication & Session Management 4-Insecure Direct Object Reference 5-Cross Site Request Forgery (CSRF) ...


1

Yes, this is perfectly safe. You will just need to ensure the security is part of the php code when needed, by limiting or filtering what it can select (already fine there) and how .json files are validated and stored, once that is addressed you will be fine and your existing solution is perfectly safe. You can also modify .htaccess file to hide folder ...



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