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19

There really are two questions that you're asking (or at least can be interpreted): Can the quoted value attribute of input[type="text"] be injected if quotes are disallowed? Can an arbitrary quoted attribute of an element be injected if quotes are disallowed. The second is trivially demonstrated by the following: <a ...


4

If you want to set text, use .text(). The entities in the attribute’s value are already interpreted, and ""><svg/onload=alert(3)>" is the value of the attribute. $(".somediv").text($("#myinput").val()); $('#destination').text($('#source').attr('title')); <script ...


4

Chrome has default protection against Reflective XSS attacks. In Chrome there is a flag with which you can start the browser. If you start the browser with this flag, you can do what you want: --disable-web-security


2

The first question you need to ask should be "What code interpreters am I handing this value off to?" Preventing XSS unfortunately isn't a recipe-based task, and from the looks of it--your application is using scriptlets, which aside from being bad Java practice, makes it much more difficult for static code-scanning tools like Fortify to give you accurate ...


2

When users submit data, you need to make sure that they've provided something you expect. For example, if you expect a number, make sure the submitted data is a number. You can also cast user data into other types. Everything submitted is initially treated like a string, so forcing known-numeric data into being an integer or float makes sanitization fast ...


2

The example code you've linked to already escapes the input prior to replacing newlines. Subsequently, the text is marked safe, because at that point it is. The relevant code is: from jinja import escape, Markup value = escape(value) return Markup(value) For the input "Hello<script>alert('hacked');</script>", this results in "Hello ...


2

If your question is "what types of xss-attacks are possible" then you better google it. I'll just leavev some examples of why you should sanitize your inputs If input is generated by echo '<input type="text" value="$var">', then simple ' breaks it. If input is plain HTML in PHP page then value=<?php deadly_php_script ?> breaks it If this is ...


1

The most important thing to take care in web applications(specially PHPs') is Data Validation of all the inputs taken from the user which are further saved in your database. For a secure application, all the transactions should be done on HTTPS. For a secure cookie management Secure and HTTPOnly cookie should be implemented.


1

why would a browser allow me to edit the dom by hand If is your browser. It trusts you. but not by javascript? Your browser doesn't trust the person who wrote the JavaScript on Domain A with the rights to access the data that the person who wrote the page on Domain B gave to you. What if Domain A was a random site you found linked in your email ...


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The Same Origin Policy prevents malicious Javascript from interacting with other domains. Otherwise, attackers could write code that silently interacts with your email or bank account. The dev tools assume that you will not be evil and attack yourself. (this assumption is not always true)


1

I just wanted to know am i vulnerable to cross site scripting No, you are not, and just using htmlspecialchars will protect you against XSS in most cases (if you use double quotes around attributes and follow the rules in my last paragraph). You don't need to use stripcslashes, and you don't need to encode your own <, etc. Do note however that ...


1

You should send an HTTP 400 (Bad Request) response code, and a minimal error message, sufficient that tech support could help a legitimate user, but not give info to an attacker. Log the request as well. A legit user might enter some info they shouldn't so you shouldn't take overly harsh measures. A real world example is Hibernate Validator's @SafeHtml ...


1

The loofah-activerecord gem (https://github.com/flavorjones/loofah-activerecord) looks like your best bet for sanitizing data on its way into the database. Using xss_foliate on your models will strip tags for all columns by default. e.g. class User < ActiveRecord::Base xss_foliate ... end I haven't found a solution to the 2nd point, but would be ...


1

I believe the person is referring to cross site scripting attacks. They tagged this as php, security, and xss take for example <input type="text" value=""><script>alert(0)</script><""> The above code will execute the alert box code; <?php $var= "\"><script>alert(0)</script><\""; ?> <input type="text" ...


1

(Un)fortunately it appears that XSS won't be possible in this instance. If angle brackets and double quote characters are escaped, this is enough to prevent XSS in HTML body and double quoted entity value contexts. Technically under the XSS Experimental Minimal Encoding Rules for HTML body, the & character should be encoded too, but I can't see a way ...


1

Implement pattern matching mechanism to find whitelist characters from your URL pattern by using RegEx.. Follow this link1 Or you can try: if (inputUrl.contains(whiteList)) { // your code goes here } Or If you need to know where it occurs, you can use indexOf: int index = inputUrl.indexOf(whiteList); if (index != -1) // -1 means "not found" { ... ...


1

This should not be an insecure way to go, just as long as you keep in mind to: ALWAYS escape & validate user inputs (remember, a $_GET param is a user input, not only $_POST); If the resource identified by the ID is for a specific user, check if that is the user accessing it. Otherwise, no problems there.


1

Simple solution: comment line 320 in system\core\Security.php $str = str_replace("\t", ' ', $str);


1

Space or tabs are never valid in a domain name, and are only accepted if your client/browser is lenient with the input before using it. Thanks user2864740.



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