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6

you can use window names for this, as they pass from iframe tag to iframe context. parent doc: <iframe name=fr2 src="data:text/html,%3Chtml%3E%0A%20%3Cscript%3E%20parent.postMessage%28%7Bname%3A%20window.name%7D%2C%20%22*%22%29%3B%3C/script%3E%0A%3C/html%3E"></iframe> <iframe name=fr3 ...


5

As per my understanding this may be try here suppose your main window's url is www.abc.com\home.php <body> <iframe src="www.abc.com\getOtherDomainContent.php?otherUrl=www.xyz.com"/> </body> getOtherDomainContent.php in this file need to write ajax call which get cross url content and push that content in current iframe ...


3

Through the url and through the image's source, an untrusted value would be, for instance: javascript:evilStuff() In the case of the link, the code will run when the user clicks it, and in the case of the image's source, it'll run when the browser attempts to load the image. Note that the image src's technique only applies to older browsers, modern ones ...


2

I wouldn't recommend to write your own anti-XSS library as malicious users are bound to know an exploit that you haven't accounted for. I would recommend to use a third party library, for example Google Caja HTML Sanitiser. Having looked at your Pen, you code is still vulnerable if the < and > tags are escaped: var unsafe = '\u003Cimg src=1 ...


2

While I agree with the vulnerabilities raised in @Alfonso's answer, the situation is actually worse: All of your untrusted variables are vulnerable to an XSS attack here. For example, say untrustedURL contained the following text "><img src="http://example.com" onerror=alert(/xss/) data-x=" this would cause the following to be rendered: <a ...


2

It is not safe, you should escape it. You can see an example of exploiting XSS using & here: http://erlend.oftedal.no/blog/?blogid=124


2

As a general rule of thumb, the other answer here is not correct. Using application/json for your content-type will fix some problems, but many clients tend to extract data from a JSON object and display it on a page. This leads to a classic attack. The ONLY reliable method to stop XSS (and I say reliable because it's not fool-proof) is to sanitize data on ...


2

This is unlikely going to be a satisfying approach - and obviously it isn't based on CSP - but it might be your only option if you really have to prevent such attacks. Before using anything like this, make sure that there is really no way to disable inline scripts (which should cover most attacks). Moreover, you should send your feedback to the ...


2

Yes you are generally correct. A piece of data is only dangerous when "used". And it is only dangerous if it has special meaning in the context it is used. For example, <script> is only dangerous if used in output to an HTML page. Robert'); DROP TABLE Students;-- is only dangerous when used in a database query. Generally, you want to make this ...


2

This can be done using a filterValidator by calling the process as named callable function of validation like this class MytableModel extends ActiveRecord { .... public function rules(){ $rules = [ [['field1','field2'],'filter','filter'=>'\yii\helpers\HtmlPurifier::process'] ]; return ...


1

What did you expect from CI XSS filtering that you think it is not working properly? To answer your questions, follow all these steps: Validate user input data first (and before doing anything with it) instead of filtering and correcting it, do this using CodeIgniter Form Validation Class Guide Link: ...


1

As long as you're the one providing the html it's safe to use them. It's only unsafe to enable html when the content comes from user input and isn't sanitized beforehand.


1

OWASP has a JSON sanitizer project, separate from AntiSamy, that converts JSON-like content to syntactically correct and embeddable JSON. The output is well-formed JSON as defined by RFC 4627. The output satisfies three additional properties: The output will not contain the substring (case-insensitively) "</script" so can be embedded inside an ...


1

Escaping is not the best option, as all these characters may naturally exist in css code ( < ' " : ; > ), thus I believe better option would be using some parser that will parse and clean the code to pure css leaving all not-understandable mess behind, one that I found: https://github.com/TylerBrinks/ExCSS


1

The approach you're trying is black-list approach which is to search for bad characters (IE <, >) and redirect to an error page and\or encode it. This is the wrong approach. You should use a white list of permitted characters and redirect to an error page if the input contains any non-permitted characters. One way to enforce this approach is regular ...


1

While you are doing a good job here, I think you should consider this: Escaping data to avoid XSS needs to be context dependent. OWASP XSS prevention cheat sheet explains this in detail. IMHO, when receiving data from the client, you should make sure data is valid according to the domain. This is what you are doing with route params. You expect it to be an ...


1

You could sanitize the html in the client side .. Sanitize/Rewrite HTML on the Client Side Also you could follow the following thread to check how to do in server side too for better security wises Preventing XSS in Node.js / server side javascript


1

If you aim to manipulate your actions before handle them you can use beforeAction in your controller/component, with something like this: protected function beforeAction($action) { #check a preg_match on a url sanitization pattern, like "[^-A-Za-z0-9+&@#/%?=~_|!:,.;\(\)]", for instance return parent::beforeAction($action); }


1

An XSS attack is one in which the page allows allows users to inject script blocks into the rendered HTML. So, first you must figure out how to do that. For instance, if the input from the user gets displayed on the page and it isn't html escaped then a user could do the following: User enters : <script>alert('testing');</script> Following ...



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