Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

As with any and all XSS prevention: Don't build HTML from strings, especially not when those strings contain user-supplied values. jQuery has a convenient facility to build elements safely - you can pass in an object with properties: $("<li>", { id: taskID, text: localStorage.getItem(taskID) }).appendTo('#task'); In fact, I recommend that you ...


5

1. Kudos for using prepared statements! 2. Read below Overall this looks quite good from a security standpoint but you are most certainly going to run into issues by using htmlentities() everywhere. With your logic, if I want to use a password like ThisIsSo<Secu>r then your code is going to convert it to it to ThisIsSo&lt;Secu&gt;r so it ...


3

You need to loop over the arrays. $entries = array_map('htmlentities', $_POST['entries']); $username = htmlentities($_POST['username']); $message = array_map('htmlentities', $_POST['message']); or to include ENT_QUOTES you can use: $entries = array_map(function($x) { return htmlentities($x, ENT_QUOTES); }, $_POST['entries']); and similarly for ...


3

Unfortunately this isn't really possible. The reason that that doesn't work is because the error stops that script from executing, but doesn't stop all scripts on the page from executing. If you're trusting HTML input from the user, you're simply going to have XSS vulnerabilities, unless you try to parse their input and remove anything that could cause a ...


2

If you take a look at the Markdown specification (either the original syntax by Jon Gruber or CommonMark), you'll find that Markdown is not supposed to replace HTML. Its only goal is to make it easier to read the text you write. Since Markdown only covers a small subset of HTML tags, you can still use HTML code inline to create exactly what you want. In ...


2

Because strip_tags doesn't fix every possible abuse case. True, it fixes the worst offenders, but there are other cases, e.g. when inserting values back into <input> tags yourself, where the quotes can be broken out of. Consider: <input type="text" value="my string" /> If my string comes from some other data source that isn't XSS-protected, it ...


2

I am not going to get into what this does prevent, but I will address some of what it allows through. Let's say your filter takes a string, and returns a string with all of the < replaced with empty strings. Ignoring that you could mess up this implementation if you are not careful. If you inject un-trusted data into html attributes or javascript ...


2

You'll need to break out your copy of Netscape 4 to reproduce it. Newer versions of Netscape (and every other browser) do not allow that use of the & operator.


2

For this, I would use the bleach module - documentation here Bleach takes care of sanitizing your HTML tags and HTML-escaping the "unsafe" tags. Here's a sample program illustrating how you might use bleach: #!/usr/bin/env python from bs4 import BeautifulSoup import bleach def sanitizeHTML(value): soup = ...


2

It depends on where the injection goes. Here is an example of XSS without the forbidden characters: Let's say a page receives a picture file name and displays it, and does not encode the quote character: https://contoso.com/displaypic?source=111.jpg <img src="111.jpg"></img> If you access this URL, you have yourself XSS: ...


1

Potentially Dangerous HTML Tags: While not an exhaustive list, the following commonly used HTML tags could allow a malicious user to inject script code: <applet> <body> <embed> <frame> <script> <frameset> <html> <iframe> <img> <style> <layer> <link> <ilayer> <meta> ...


1

If you want to prevent 'javascript:' protocol links, you can check with a regular expression that ensures that only http: https: or a relative url is used. It is best to white-list the allowed protocols rather than prevent forbidden ones. The encodeURIComponent function is for adding parameters to the query string of the URI which is not what I think you ...


1

As I see it, there are two main options: You can make a whitelist of allowed parameters, and don't bother with actually doing anything with the actual url being passed. In other words, you'd do something like ?url=example and have that redirect to http://www.example.com if it is in the whitelist. To be clear, these are aliases, not a rule where you just ...


1

Do I need to escaping html output in input field? Yes, every input must be escaped. Especially if it comes from the user. You should never ever trust user's input. htmlspecialchars has some sort of a bug where you can't directly include strings in it's second and third parameter. Therefore a workaround is needed. As of PHP 5.4+ the default charset is ...


1

Your right about using htmlspecialchars(). Here is an example which works: <input type="text" value="<?php echo htmlspecialchars('<script type="text/javascript">alert("Xss done");/script>') ?>"/> which produces <input type="text" value="&lt;script type=&quot;text/javascript&quot;&gt;alert(&quot;Xss ...


1

Struts2 creates a map of parameters from the request using request.getParameterMap() and put these parameters to the action context. So, you can create an interceptor that getting these parameters from the context and do what you want. Add a new interceptor to all actions either using custom stack or overridden action config.


1

SOLUTION Use the following code to encode HTML tags and entities: dataString = $('<div/>').text(data).html(); DEMO See this jsFiddle for code and demonstration.


1

Take what ever the user entered and hash it, then use the hash as the password. That way the user has no control over the exact password. Better yet use PBKDF2, it is designed to create derived keys from a password.


1

You could read the raw input data in order to bypass the filter, but you shouldn't do that. The 'global_xss_filtering' setting does automatic XSS filtering on input, which is a bad practice and that's why this feature is DEPRECATED in CodeIgniter 3. Don't enable global XSS filtering; escape everything manually on output; and please, unless that form of ...


1

Mine is a somewhat controversial opinion, but I think you should validate and reject inbound XSS. You should escape it on output too, but it shouldn't be in your database in the first place, as dbs are long-lasting and often cross-application. See https://www.owasp.org/index.php/OWASP_JSON_Sanitizer Use Hibernate Validator (you don't need to use Hibernate ...


1

You can specify a Content Security Policy to prevent any inline JavaScript from executing. See here for browser compatibility. It is also recommended to run any user input through an HTML sanitizer too, as this will help protect browsers without CSP support. Using BBcode or something like MarkDown is also recommended, rather than allowing users to enter ...


1

The original Parsedown library has an option to escape html: echo Parsedown::instance() ->setMarkupEscaped(true) # escapes markup (HTML) ->text("<div><strong>*Some text*</strong></div>"); # Output: # <p>&lt;div&gt;&lt;strong&gt;<em>Some ...


1

Grave accents have no special meaning within HTML so are not an XSS attack vector there (unless you embed them in a context where they do have special meaning, but I can't think of any such contexts supported by HTML).


1

According to OWASP every character with ascii value of less than 256 is ok. What? No. XSS prevention depends on context! I'm also very sure that OWASP doesn't regard every ASCII value less than 256 as okay, since ASCII is only defined for characters 0 - 127. I also don't want some very generic solution such as sanitizing each param by striping it's ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible