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6

Each query that contains user inputs should have cfqueryparam like so: <cfquery name="enter_question" datasource="#dsn#"> INSERT INTO xx_questions(q_id, q_name, q_narrative, q_used, q_type) VALUES( <cfqueryparam cfsqltype="CF_SQL_INTEGER" ...


6

You are looking at the wrong end of the problem. What you've shown us there is just that you have a form with some form fields in it. That is not a problem. What is the problem is that if there's a form... there must be a form submission. And you'll have some process that receives the form submission and does something with it. Part of "doing something with ...


4

You need to use <cfqueryparam>. Check the documentation at: https://wikidocs.adobe.com/wiki/display/coldfusionen/cfqueryparam Try something like this (you should change the CFSQLType to match whatever your DB columns are): <cfquery name="enter_question" datasource="#dsn#"> INSERT INTO xx_questions(q_id, q_name, q_narrative, ...


3

All URL based security restrictions in client side JavaScript are based on the URL of the webpage containing the <script> element which loads the JS. The URL the JS itself is hosted at is irrelevant. Now, I know that I can't access Cookies under mysite.com from the JS. The script is loaded into example.net and hosted on example.com. It can ...


2

The default behavior of web browsers that initiate requests from a page via JavaScript (AKA AJAX) is that they follow the same-origin policy. This means that requests can only be made via AJAX to the same domain (or sub domain). Requests to an entirely different domain will fail. This restriction exists because requests made at other domains by your browser ...


2

jsonify function haven't option for escaping. But there is htmlsafe_dumps function in flask.json which you can use: from flask import json, jsonify return jsonify(**json.loads(json.htmlsafe_dumps(obj)))


2

Secure cookie will be available on https pages. I suppose you use http://www.example.com/index.php Try https://www.example.com/index.php


2

You can edit the form in your browser using for example Firebug and just add any field with any name. Even more so, you can just forge whole post/get requests with any data you like (using curl or many other tools). So: no, it is not.


1

Not necessarily. The input type doesn't matter, because requests can be spoofed (easy with GET, but not too hard with POST requests). What matters is that the result of the form is sanitized before inserting it into the page.


1

No, the {{}} only has to do with how a value is rendered into the DOM. A string entered using {{input}} is not transformed in any way by Ember, nor should it be. In general, one does not want to HTML-escape information being held in the DB. The data in the DB should be the actual data. The HTML escaping is something that should be done, as Ember does, when ...


1

I'm sorry the reply is not more complete, but I don't fully know your backend technology. Basically, your Angular app is making a preflighted request to your server, because of CORS, meaning that first it is doing an HTTP.OPTIONS request on that URL and after a successful response from the server it will make the HTTP.xxx request (in this case a POST). ...


1

I think this warning can safely be ignored. The X-Frame-Options header is used to prevent clickjacking. SignalR responses don't have any links or any other clickable content. However, it might be a good idea to set an X-Frame-Options header on every response to be extra safe. You can do this via IIS manager or web.config. If you are not using IIS, you can ...


1

It seems to me that you have two options here. The first is to parse out dangerous searches client side in your jQuery code before sending this text input to the server. I'm not sure exactly what you'd be looking for, but I assume you want to stop the user from sending specific things in your search bar. A good way to prevent this would be to search for ...


1

I think that xss in this line: [bodyString appendString:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@=%@&", key, headersAndValues[key]]]; You need to check key and headersAndValues[key] on invalid characters. NSString *checkedKey = [self alphanumericStringFromString:checkedKey]; + (NSString *)alphanumericString { // NSString category NSCharacterSet ...


1

As with any value provided by a user you need to be escape the value when it is presented on the page. Update search.aspx to use HttpUtility.HtmlEncode(tx) in any place that the value passed as the tx parameter is emitted. OWASP provide some good guidance about how to protect against XSS vulnerabilities like this. ...


1

requestValidation is a good approach. At a global level one more thing I can think of is enabling X-XSS-Protection header at all http responses. It is easy to implement and gives you some native defences that the browser (IE 8+, Chrome) has to offer based on xss patterns. X-XSS-Protection: 1; mode=block You may look at Content-Security-Policy, but I ...


1

params[:bar] simply returns a value, which could be a String, Fixnum, Array, etc. It is no different than passing any other link_to params. No additional caution beyond Rails' conventions is needed since your example will only be sending a GET request. As @tadman mentioned, link_to will handle properly escaping this, so you can put in arbitrary data ...


1

Parameters are sanitized. No worries. This is a fragment from a Rails console with an example.


1

The src isn't executed, so that won't work. A solution would be to use onerror : <img src="wrong" onerror="alert('XSS')"> Depending on how your src attribute is injected, you may be able to pass this value : wrong" onerror="alert('XSS') But no decent framework is vulnerable to that kind of attack.


1

Fixed content or not, that doesn't matter. An "attacker" could change that if he wanted. But... event if it's not changed: everything is vulnerable to XSS if it depends on data sent by the client. How to prevent it? escape everything! How to do that... that depends.. you can do that server-side (php, etc...) or client-side (javascript). But don't rely on ...


1

No. While you make use of externally inputted data, you never inject it into the DOM.


1

First, let's talk about the same origin policy. I'll quote from a previous answer of mine: The same-origin policy was invented because it prevents code from one website from accessing credential-restricted content on another site. Ajax requests are by default sent with any auth cookies granted by the target site. For example, suppose I accidentally ...


1

Isn't this a possible security issue? Yes, this is called Cross-Site-Scripting (XSS). It is most definitely a security issue. Bottom line, never include code, from any domain, that you don't trust. End of story. If an attacker can get code running on your domain, it's game-over. Shouldn't this trigger the same-origin-policy protection? No. ...


1

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/HTTP/Access_control_CORS var invocation = new XMLHttpRequest(); var url = 'http://bar.other/resources/credentialed-content/'; function callOtherDomain(){ if(invocation) { invocation.open('GET', url, true); invocation.withCredentials = true; invocation.onreadystatechange = handler; ...


1

Something like this should do the trick: var fun = []; for(var i = 0; i < msg.length; i++){ // Don't use for...in to iterate over an array. fun[i] = msg[i]; // Copy the current object. for(var j in fun[i]){ // Iterate over the properties in this object. fun[i][j] = sanitizer.sanitize(fun[i][j]); // Sanitize the ...



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