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9

 Does this code pattern create a XSS vulnerability, if an attacker chooses url maliciously? Edit: yes, but not for the reason in your question. The weird auto-JSONP feature is internally applied to AJAX requests using ajaxPrefilter("json jsonp"). So it applies to the json prefilter list but not other types or the default *. However, prefilters apply ...


8

jQuery.get does pose an XSS security risk. If you look at the source for jQuery (or the documentation for jQuery.get), you will see that jQuery.get and jQuery.post are just wrappers for jQuery.ajax({ url: url, data: data, success: success, dataType: dataType });. There are two problems here: If dataType is jsonp, or the URL ends in =? and dataType is ...


6

Unless you configure your request to NEVER use JSONP (which jQuery will automatically try to use for some cross origin requests in some circumstances), it is not safe to use $.getJSON() against any random foreign URL. If jQuery switches to JSONP, that would directly enable script injection into your page from the other origin since JSONP works precisely by ...


6

I am using filter_input() to filter any data that comes from user before inserting into database. This is a bad practice. Do not mangle your data before you insert it into a database. It's 2015; don't sanitize, use prepared statements instead. $db = new \PDO( 'mysql:host=localhost;dbname=mydatabase;charset=UTF-8', $username, $password ); ...


5

You should always validate data provided by user and assume that it could be modified. It can be even modified not by a third party, but by a malicious user or by someone who has access to legitimate user's browser. You should also protect cookies that contain user personal data (email, password, address, etc.) from XSS. A good way would be using HttpOnly ...


5

It depends. TL;DR Yes, it's unsafe in certain cases. If: You're not using Content Security Policy to filter outwards request (caniuse) The client browser support CORS (caniuse) The attacker can choose the URL Then the attacker can execute JS on your page. A malicious server with a matching protocol, the right CORS headers ...


3

http://permalink.co/multivac/biteme.php?name=<script>window.onload = function() {var link=document.getElementsByTagName("a");link[0].href="http://www.google.com/";}</script> its working correctly, i think you are using google chrome ,chrome prevents xss(see screenshot), same experience with Internet explorer(11.0),it also prevent xss I ...


3

You try to protect yourself against SQL injection by calling xss_clean. xss_clean will protect you against xss injections, but will not prevent sql injections. Let me break it down to you: SQL injection: Malicious user input, which tries to hack your database on server side. User input will contain SQL code. XSS injection: Malicious user input, which tries ...


2

You didn't provide enough informations about the problem, but I think it may be caused by: The website you are trying to inject uses Str_Replace or different method to replace some characters from your code, rendering it useless. You placed your image out of span, possibly forcing the server operator to ignore your code. Try checking the source code of ...


2

No, there is no shortcut. Data escaping always needs to happen on a case by case basis; not only with regards to HTML, but to any other textual format as well (SQL, JSON, CSV, whathaveyou). The "trick" is use tools which do not require you to think about this much and hence may allow you to "miss" something. If you're just echoing strings into other strings, ...


2

Protection against XSS isn't just necessary when variables are to be displayed on the screen; it is needed whenever user-generated values are used to build HTML markup, whatever the context. It is necessary to call htmlspecialchars() on a PHP variable placed inside a <textarea>. Consider the following: <?php // Unsafe text in the variable ...


1

Space or tabs are never valid in a domain name, and are only accepted if your client/browser is lenient with the input before using it. Thanks user2864740.


1

You've passed the first stage which is to recognise that there is a potential issue and skipped straight to trying to find a solution, without stopping to think about how you want to deal the scenario of the content. This is a critical pre-cusrsor to solving the problem. The general rule is that you validate input and escape output validate input - decide ...


1

You are NEVER 100% secure, however you should take a look at this. If you use ENT_QUOTES parameter too, currently there are no ways to inject ANY XSS on your website if you're using valid charset (and your users don't use outdated browsers). However, if you want to allow people to only post SOME html tags into their "Tweet" (for example <b> for bold ...


1

While this question has an accepted answer, I think David Morrow's answer is the best/ simplest/ most practical (uses the print_r true flag): echo "<pre>".htmlentities($print_r($some_array, true))."</pre>"; Never-the-less, here is another solution that uses output buffering: <?php ob_start(); print_r($some_array); $buffer = ...


1

That is a good point. But how about forcing the data-type format to ensure it won't be used as JSONP $.ajax({ url: url, data: data, success: success, dataType: dataType // force text/plain }); The acutal $.getJSON() is used for convenience when we want to speed up on parsing, so if you are really aware of security use customised $.ajax() ...


1

As @dandavis comments, if the value of the myVar query string parameter is not output to the page then no XSS can occur. Read the OWASP page on Cross-site Scripting (XSS) for more information, but basically a page is vulnerable to XSS if it is not correctly encoding output from untrusted sources. e.g. if the page output the value of myVar and myVar was ...


1

Enter this and you will see: index.php?name=%3Cscript%20type%3D%22text%2Fjavascript%22%3E%0Awindow.location.href%20%3D%20%22http%3A%2F%2Fgoogle.de%22%3B%0A%3C%2Fscript%3E In this example you go to google. In real world you would go to a phishing site, which look exactly the same, like your page. To santize this, you want to remove tags for example: ...


1

While @meager's answer will definitely work, I don't think this logic belongs in a model. Simply because it adds view-level concerns (HTML safeness) to the model layer, which should just include business logic. Instead, I would recommend using a Presenter for this (see http://nithinbekal.com/posts/rails-presenters/ or find a gem for this -- I personally love ...


1

They would be able to set cookies that can be read by members.myapp.com - so if they are any coookie handling vulnerabilities on members.myapp.com then they could possibly exploit these. An example of cookie poisoning could be session fixation. XSS would not be possible unless both domains opted in. i.e. they would both have to contain the following code. ...


1

My answer is perhaps a bit naive but why not store the token in the persistence storage of your browser. If you use Angular, with code as describe below: function((...), $window) { (...) $window.sessionStorage['userToken'] = '<user-token>'; } I don't really see other approaches (exception cookies) to keep such hints when the browser's page ...


1

It would be really hard to do a regular expression that would know if an URL is an attempt at script injection or not. To match the example you gave, searching for <script would be enough. But a <script> tag is not the only dangerous thing in HTML: consider for example the URL ...


1

When you threat model or build a threat profile for the application you are dealing with, it will come clear on the systems (apps, web pages) that you are interfacing and communicating with. You will get to know the places you are receiving the input from, you will get to know the places you are outputting. You can make the decision of whether you want to ...


1

Your premise is incorrect. The Same Origin Policy says nothing about the ability of a web page to include resources on an external domain. It prevents direct access to resources via scripting that are owned by different Origins without them opting in. Therefore CORS and JSONP are not workarounds for the Same Origin Policy. CORS enables an Origin to opt in ...


1

If they are entering JavaScript code which you will then store and include when showing a page to other users, then yes, it's a security hole. It means that they can do anything you can do on that page, in the context of someone else's user account; this could be used to steal information from other users, etc. If only they will ever view the page with the ...


1

The vulnerability means that ZAP managed to insert arbitrary code into that input field. This means that you're most likely not validating user input somewhere in the app. You should be more careful about generating that input field, and ensure that the GET parameter(s) used to generate it are validate accordingly. Remember, it's better to be safe, than ...


1

It looks like they're being returned as html entities. From the php manual: string htmlspecialchars_decode ( string $string [, int $flags = ENT_COMPAT | ENT_HTML401 ] ) You've got htmlentities up there, so that could be why you're returning them. Try adding _decode to that and see what happens (or take that out entirely). So your line would look like ...


1

I agree with the other answers that this is probably a false positive. Still, it's certainly easy to make mistakes with such code, as Bergi's slice example shows. In modern browsers, this code could be more cleanly written as: var loc = new URL("#somehash", location); location.replace(loc); This avoids any possibility of subtly messing up the URL ...


1

There is an attack vector, though I cannot think of a way it cannot be used in your case. However, the suggested code is definitely clearer, less error-prone, and therefore safer. I could contrive an example attack if you had used the slice method instead of substr. Should make no difference, should it? Then try it out with the location http://example.com ...


1

I'm gonna say this is a false positive attack vector according to this article, the only known way to inject the website is throught adding the #maliciouscode into your URL bar, however your function ignores the # fragments, so no code is really pasted in the website.



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