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2

it must : start with # (a hash in a url) then maybe a "~" (one or zero) then "!" then one ore more letters (\w ) or dots (.) or dash (-) then maybe a "slash" (one or zero) then a "?" or then end of the string This means it matches url like http://yourdomain/foo/#!bar?etc and replace the current url with http://yourdomain/foo/bar?etc to try ...


1

Given you are developing an iOS app I assume you are on OSX in which case you can essentially launch Chrome with XXS enabled be executing the following command line: open -a "Google Chrome" --args --disable-web-security In fact, I use it so often I added an alias in my .bash_profile: alias chrometest='open -a "Google Chrome" --args --disable-web-security' ...


1

No. CSP is not supported by all browsers yet. And many use older browsers. CSP is at the moment a good bonus for those who use decent browsers and you can get warnings from the report policy. But not something you can rely on. If you only have users with CSP enabled browsers, CSP should be safe against XSS with htmlspecialchars in php and escaping all ...


-1

This maybe helpful for someone.. 1) according to http://www.php.net/manual/en/filter.filters.sanitize.php, I've tested different filters: grab the code from https://github.com/tazotodua/sanitize-filter-php-variable/blob/master/sanitize-filters-php and test with your variables. also, you can use more parameters&filers too p.s. you can use these ...


0

Jeff has a good answer, but you can improve it by leveraging POST method, not GET, since GET is quite restricted and not good to send a big bunch of data. var req:URLRequest = new URLRequest(url); req.method = URLRequestMethod.POST; req.data = payload; var l:Loader = new Loader(); l.load(req); Notice POST request method, it will do the trick


1

Assuming you're using a modern version of php, htmlspecialchars should do the trick. It's important to note that you also must provide the same encoding (utf8) for the whole page via headers and meta tags. Otherwise, you're subject to UTF-7 injection. Also do note, that htmlspecialchars is fine only for attributes like value, that don't interpret ...


0

If server response is in json you can use jsonp as dataType attribute in ajax function. This will work in some occasions.


0

If you are using .Net MVC you can configure it through customHeaders in Web.Config. To add these headers, go to the httpprotocol node and add those headers inside the customHeaders node. <httpprotocol> <customheaders> <remove name="X-Powered-By"> <add name="X-XSS-Protection" value="1; mode=block"> ...


2

Adding a Filter is the easiest way to do this task, AOP is useful when you don't have any easy way to add transversal behavior/ functionality, but in this precise case is unnecessary. You can check how common it is just googling "java xss filter", there are plenty of examples.


0

This should be safe. It depends on how you are allowing these tags through whilst HTML encoding everything else. Also beware of any user controlled content within your script tags. e.g. if a user could set % tex code here to something like </script> <script> alert('xssed') then the following would be rendered: <script type="math/tex"> ...


0

i'd found this because i was worried about xss in laravel, so this is the packages gvlatko it is easy: To Clear Inputs = $cleaned = Xss::clean(Input::get('comment'); To Use in views = $cleaned = Xss::clean(Input::file('profile'), TRUE);


0

You seem to be getting your parsing order reversed. The HTML parser converts the value of the attribute to text (so &quot; becomes "). That text is then passed to the JavaScript engine. So what you have is fine and works as it should do. Is the encoded character being decoded by the javascript engine before executing it? No, it is decoded by ...


-1

You need to use escaped quotes instead <input type="button" value="test" onclick="window.location.href = "\"foo;bar\""> or use single quotes too <input type="button" value="test" onclick="window.location.href = 'foo;bar;'">


1

A basic check woule be to to see if your payload is present in the page's source without being escaped, something like this should do the trick : payload = "<SCrIpT>alert('XSS')</ScRiPt>" xss_url = 'http://www.foo.bar/index.php?ids=">'+payload r = requests.get(xss_url) if payload.lower() in r.text.lower(): print("vulnerable") This checks ...


1

The confirm whether an injection is executable script you could do e.g. Open the URL using Selenium WebDriver and Firefox Instead of alert() use window.exploitDetected = True as the injection verification Wait the the page to load Run JavaScript in the context of the WebDriver, read if window.exploitDetected has been set


1

Laravel uses PDO's parameter binding, so SQL injection is not something you should worry about. You should read this though. Input::get() does not filter anything. Triple curly braces do the same as e() and HTML::entities(). All of them call htmlentities with UTF-8 support: htmlentities($your_string, ENT_QUOTES, 'UTF-8', false);


1

You should use {{{$a}}} because for example Input can has HTML tag. Laravel won't filter it. To avoid SQL injection you should use bind your parameters running queries like: $var = 1; $results = DB::select('select * from users where id = ?', array($var)); and not: $results = DB::select('select * from users where id = '.$var);


0

Using xss_clean even once is bad as far as I am concerned. This routine attempts to sanitise your data by removing parts or replacing parts. It is lossy and not guaranteed to return the same content when run multiple times. It is also hard to predict and will not always act appropriately. Given the amount of things it does to try to sanitise a string there ...


1

The way that request validation works in ASP.NET is that the input is validated and an exception thrown only for the first call to Request.RawUrl, Request.QueryString, and so on. Glimpse looks up the query string early on in the request (from RequestMetadata.get_RequestIsAjax) and swallows the exception, so future calls to Request.QueryString in the same ...


1

I've found the same problem if you install Glimpse The following line in web.config totally stops request validation from happening - no matter what your Glimpse settings are: <system.webServer> <modules runAllManagedModulesForAllRequests="true"> <add name="Glimpse" type="Glimpse.AspNet.HttpModule, Glimpse.AspNet" ...


0

This looks like it's trying several different injections, so I'll try and break them down one at a time: The First Injection ';alert(String.fromCharCode(88,83,83))// This injection attempts to terminate a JavaScript string literal (using '), then terminate the statement (with ;) and makes a call to alert(String.fromCharCode(88,83,83)) which will cause a ...


1

There are three reasons it's best to avoid html: security risks (xss, etc) performance event listeners The security risks are largely mitigated by markdown, but you still have to decide what you consider valid, and ensure it's disallowed (maybe you don't allow images, for example). The performance issue is only relevant when something will change in the ...


5

Most Markdown processors (and I believe Showdown as well) allow the writer to use inline HTML. For example a user might enter: This is _markdown_ with a <marquee>ghost from the past</marquee>. Or even **worse**: <script> alert("spam"); </script> As such, you should have a whitelist of tags and strip all the other tags after ...


-1

There are two ways to achieve this. .htaccess php_flag session.use_trans_sid off php ini_set('session.use_trans_sid', false);


2

You seem to have a major misunderstanding. That IBM article is clearly targeted at "plain vanilla" JSP applications which indeed don't have any form of automatic XSS prevention (even though you'd in JSP better just use JSTL <c:out> or fn:escapeXml() for this instead of all that clumsiness the article is writing about). JSF, however, has already builtin ...


2

Why would you avoid using this function? Many programmers would pick their reasons to avoid using "switch" statements, depending on the context. For instance, a project might have many "switch" statements with duplicated code to do something that would be solved with polymorphism. The "switch", in this case, is being used to map HTTP methods with ...


1

No, for the HTML body you will also need to encode the & character to prevent an attacker from potentially escaping the escape. Check out the XSS Experimental Minimal Encoding Rules:- HTML Body (up to HTML 4.01): HTML Entity encode < & specify charset in metatag to avoid UTF7 XSS XHTML Body: HTML Entity encode < ...


0

To answer your switch question, the reason for potentially not using it in an application is that it is slower than using if / else if / else -- there are some benchmarks available at PHP Bench that demonstrate this. The performance difference of switch vs if/else is likely to be negligible in comparison to time taken for requests and responses to be sent ...


0

The answer is no, someone will find his way to exploit it, somehow. You are underestimating the number of techniques and the creativity of attackers. Read through the OWASP XSS Cheat Sheet https://www.owasp.org/index.php/XSS_Filter_Evasion_Cheat_Sheet to have an idea of the number of ways this could happen. In your case, does it protect against an XSS into ...


0

I found an answer to my question. Previously when I escape the value returned in "result" variables, not only symbols are being escaped but spaces are escaped as well. After going through OWASP website again, I found the ESAPI library to do escaping on server side before returning to the AJAX Request.


0

Validation and XSS are two very different concepts. You cannot balance them. You cannot "sometimes allow XSS". You also do not want to allow input that does not make sense, or that you can't use. If you require an email for something, you can allow an user to enter "mailme at gmail dot com", but if you do not know how to parse this, then there is no point in ...


5

There is a UDF on CFlib.org isXss that checks a value to determine if it is xss. I have used this function and built a custom tag to check every form field and query string field before I submit it to the database. After implementing this, I have been able to pass countless PCI scans and have not had any xss issues.


0

Instead of $('#div1').html(result); Try $('#div1').text(result); NOTE :- Use .text(…) when you intend to display the value as a simple text(as in your case). Use .html(…) when you intend to display the value as a html formatted text (or HTML content). Read more on .text() and .html() here.


0

This talks about a Cordova/PhoneGap security issues: http://packetstormsecurity.com/files/124954/apachecordovaphonegap-bypass.txt "The following email was sent to Apache Cordova/PhoneGap on 12/13/2013, and again on 1/17/2014. As there has been no response, we are re-posting it here to alert the general public of the inherent vulnerabilities in Apache ...


0

The solution as implemented for a cfwheels 1.1 app: I used the slashdot file from https://code.google.com/p/owaspantisamy/downloads/list This goes in application.cfc: <cfcomponent output="false"> <cfset this.security.antisamypolicy="antisamy-slashdot-1.4.4.xml"> <cfinclude template="wheels/functions.cfm"> ...


2

I agree with Ray, validation is work, and it is very important work. If you could have a server wide setting it would be way to generalized to fit all situations. When you do your own validation for specific fields you can really narrow down the attack surface. For example, assume you have a form with three fields; name, credit card number, social security ...



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