Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

public static bool ValidateAntiXSS(string inputParameter) { if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(inputParameter)) { // Following regex convers all the js events and html tags mentioned in followng links. //https://www.owasp.org/index.php/XSS_Filter_Evasion_Cheat_Sheet ...


2

Yes you are generally correct. A piece of data is only dangerous when "used". And it is only dangerous if it has special meaning in the context it is used. For example, <script> is only dangerous if used in output to an HTML page. Robert'); DROP TABLE Students;-- is only dangerous when used in a database query. Generally, you want to make this ...


0

Not all SQL statements are parameterizable. For example, if you need to use dynamic identifiers (as opposed to literals). Even whitelisting can be hard, sometimes it needs to be dynamic. Escaping XSS on output is a good idea. Until you forget to escape it on your admin dashboard too and they steal all your admin's cookies. Don't let XSS in your database.


0

for all actions in same just add a event handle to onBeginRequest: $this->attachEventHandler('onBeginRequest', [$this, 'purifyParams']); public function purifyParams($event) { $userAgent = $this->getRequest()->getUserAgent(); $isIE = preg_match('/(msie)[ \/]([\w.]+)/i', $userAgent, $version); if (!empty($isIE) && (int) ...


0

If you put Session ID in a hidden form field, that is a lot more secure, however it can hamper the user experience. The reason is that is this would inherently protect you against CSRF because any cross-domain requests made to your site will mean that the browser will not automatically include the session identifier that makes CSRF attacks possible. It also ...


1

You could sanitize the html in the client side .. Sanitize/Rewrite HTML on the Client Side Also you could follow the following thread to check how to do in server side too for better security wises Preventing XSS in Node.js / server side javascript


1

While you are doing a good job here, I think you should consider this: Escaping data to avoid XSS needs to be context dependent. OWASP XSS prevention cheat sheet explains this in detail. IMHO, when receiving data from the client, you should make sure data is valid according to the domain. This is what you are doing with route params. You expect it to be an ...


0

This can also happen when you configure your fb app wrongly, check next three steps 1- make sure that redirect_uriof your facebook app isnt missing Go to your App >> Settings >> Advanced >> Security. then set the redirect_uri 2- Make sure that login Client OAuth Login and Embedded browser OAuth Login is allowed for your app Go to your App >> ...


0

Sounds like you might want to look into Markdown syntax. There could be a markdown parser that could enforce the control you are looking for. You would have to convert the HTML into the Markdown syntax then use the Markdown to recreate the markup in the format you want. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Markdown A quick search found this markdown parser for ...


1

The approach you're trying is black-list approach which is to search for bad characters (IE <, >) and redirect to an error page and\or encode it. This is the wrong approach. You should use a white list of permitted characters and redirect to an error page if the input contains any non-permitted characters. One way to enforce this approach is regular ...


0

browser.urlbar.filter.javascript does not attempt to filter data from entered URLs, it's not an analogue of IE's misguided anti-XSS filter. It's only about showing javascript: URLs in history lookup and it's irrelevant here. Your example URL doesn't work for me in any browser, because the characters < and > are invalid to include in URLs at all. ...


0

CSP is one of the ways to reduce the damage done by XSS, but it is by no means a magic wand that fixes all issues caused by XSS vulnerabilities. This non-goal is also listed explicitly in the CSP specification: Content Security Policy (CSP) is not intended as a first line of defense against content injection vulnerabilities. Instead, CSP is best used as ...


1

Escaping is not the best option, as all these characters may naturally exist in css code ( < ' " : ; > ), thus I believe better option would be using some parser that will parse and clean the code to pure css leaving all not-understandable mess behind, one that I found: https://github.com/TylerBrinks/ExCSS


0

Every web application firewall is working using signatures of attacks. Type-0 XSS generates the same signature as reflected XSS so this would probably be stopped by any WAF. Type-0 XSS does not occur due to server site code vulnerability but the request obviously reaches the server in the process of the page loading. The only issue that could prevent the ...


1

OWASP has a JSON sanitizer project, separate from AntiSamy, that converts JSON-like content to syntactically correct and embeddable JSON. The output is well-formed JSON as defined by RFC 4627. The output satisfies three additional properties: The output will not contain the substring (case-insensitively) "</script" so can be embedded inside an ...


-2

Content Security Policy is for the security of the page itself. Navigating to another page is not a bypass or something that concerns CSP. CSP is only concerned with your page and what it can do. It's also not about restricting the utility of the browser for the end user (like the ability to install plugins or open links). default-src 'none'; This ...


2

This is unlikely going to be a satisfying approach - and obviously it isn't based on CSP - but it might be your only option if you really have to prevent such attacks. Before using anything like this, make sure that there is really no way to disable inline scripts (which should cover most attacks). Moreover, you should send your feedback to the ...


0

Firstly, you can use regular expressions to validate your inputs, you can generalize your inputs in some regular expresions, something like this: $num = $_GET["index"]; if (preg_match("^\d{2}$", $num)) { //allowed } else { //not allowed } Also you can create a white list or black list, if your inputs can be grouped into what is allowed in your ...


0

You should be using both. The typical pattern is to attempt to sanitize scary data on the way in (and you should really be rejecting the request if sanitization was necessary for a given value) and encoding on the way out. The reason for the former is that encoding sometimes gets missed. The reason for the latter is that your database cannot be trusted as a ...


2

As a general rule of thumb, the other answer here is not correct. Using application/json for your content-type will fix some problems, but many clients tend to extract data from a JSON object and display it on a page. This leads to a classic attack. The ONLY reliable method to stop XSS (and I say reliable because it's not fool-proof) is to sanitize data on ...


0

This articles shows how you can make your application secure with SQL Injections, XSS Attacks and CSRF. Hope it helps you.


1

If you aim to manipulate your actions before handle them you can use beforeAction in your controller/component, with something like this: protected function beforeAction($action) { #check a preg_match on a url sanitization pattern, like "[^-A-Za-z0-9+&@#/%?=~_|!:,.;\(\)]", for instance return parent::beforeAction($action); }


2

I wouldn't recommend to write your own anti-XSS library as malicious users are bound to know an exploit that you haven't accounted for. I would recommend to use a third party library, for example Google Caja HTML Sanitiser. Having looked at your Pen, you code is still vulnerable if the < and > tags are escaped: var unsafe = '\u003Cimg src=1 ...


1

Thanks for help guys. Finally figured out a solution to prevent XSS issue and pass Fortify static code analysis. I have used ESAPI together with Anitsamy library. Here are the 3 main changes required. Implement Anitsamy Filter Add a new filter and override request methods getParameter , getParameterValues to strip out any suspicious tags in the ...


3

No it does not. Also, never try to do security through blacklists. Use whitelists. And never try to filter for XSS. Encode your output for the format you're writing to. For HTML (body and quoted attributes) then use something like php's htmlspecialchars().


0

this is called security issue. Cross site scripting, you have many methods to avoid it, What's the best method for sanitizing user input with PHP? For example if you have a option to input an email address you have to validate it like below: <?php $email = filter_var($_POST['username'], FILTER_SANITIZE_EMAIL); ?> If there is a option to ...


1

The most important thing to take care in web applications(specially PHPs') is Data Validation of all the inputs taken from the user which are further saved in your database. For a secure application, all the transactions should be done on HTTPS. For a secure cookie management Secure and HTTPOnly cookie should be implemented.


2

The example code you've linked to already escapes the input prior to replacing newlines. Subsequently, the text is marked safe, because at that point it is. The relevant code is: from jinja import escape, Markup value = escape(value) return Markup(value) For the input "Hello<script>alert('hacked');</script>", this results in "Hello ...


1

why would a browser allow me to edit the dom by hand If is your browser. It trusts you. but not by javascript? Your browser doesn't trust the person who wrote the JavaScript on Domain A with the rights to access the data that the person who wrote the page on Domain B gave to you. What if Domain A was a random site you found linked in your email ...


1

The Same Origin Policy prevents malicious Javascript from interacting with other domains. Otherwise, attackers could write code that silently interacts with your email or bank account. The dev tools assume that you will not be evil and attack yourself. (this assumption is not always true)


0

Option 1: look at the accepted answer at: HTML-encoding in JavaScript/jQuery Option 2: Put the [AllowHtml] attribute on the model item that binds to this textbox and that will let the value into your controller where you can use HtmlEncode. Option 3: Put the [ValidateInput(false)] attribute on your controller action, this lets everything through no ...


0

The log file entries shows evidence of someone attempting to identify a cross site scripting vulnerability. Based on the code snippet you provided it is not vulnerable.


0

The easiest and probably most secure way I can think of (doing this with regex) is to first replace all < and > with &lt; and &gt; respectively, and then explicitly "un-replace" the b and i tags. To replace < and > you just need text substitution, no regex. But I trust you know how to do this in regex anyway. To re-enable the i and b ...


0

Can you do this with regex? Kind of. You have to write a regex to find all tags that are not b or i tags. Below is a simple example of one, it matches any tag with more than 1 character in it, which only allows <a>, <b>, <i>, <p>, <q>, <s>, and <u> (no spaces, no attributes and no classes allowed), which I believe ...


-2

Parse out tags, replace with a special delimiter (or store indices). XSS sanitize the input. Replace the delimiters with tags. Make sure you don't have any mismatched tags. XSS sanitizing needs to be done server-side - the client is in control of the client-side, and can circumvent any checks there. I still maintain that the OWASP Cheat Sheet is ...


0

The ZAP Fuzzer does not detect vulnerabilities - its a manual tool to help you find vulnerabilities. The "Reflected" indication is just that - an indication that the payload submitted is reflected in the response. If the payload was "A" and there was an "A" in the response then you'd get that indication. You need to look at the context of the reflected ...


1

I just wanted to know am i vulnerable to cross site scripting No, you are not, and just using htmlspecialchars will protect you against XSS in most cases (if you use double quotes around attributes and follow the rules in my last paragraph). You don't need to use stripcslashes, and you don't need to encode your own <, etc. Do note however that ...


0

You should use Jsoup to sanitize the request. The code will look like this: String unsafe ="<p><a href='http://example.com/' onclick='stealCookies()'>Link</a></p>"; String safe = Jsoup.clean(unsafe, Whitelist.basic()); // now: <p><a href="http://example.com/" rel="nofollow">Link</a></p> I recommend you also ...


-2

you can do that by by use modified confrim() function in browser console: function confrim() { return true; } now when use confrim() code automatically accept by himself(return false for Cancel). Attention: you can use this code just in console(for xss using) not in web developing because this code affect all confrim() function in browser.


1

You should send an HTTP 400 (Bad Request) response code, and a minimal error message, sufficient that tech support could help a legitimate user, but not give info to an attacker. Log the request as well. A legit user might enter some info they shouldn't so you shouldn't take overly harsh measures. A real world example is Hibernate Validator's @SafeHtml ...


1

The loofah-activerecord gem (https://github.com/flavorjones/loofah-activerecord) looks like your best bet for sanitizing data on its way into the database. Using xss_foliate on your models will strip tags for all columns by default. e.g. class User < ActiveRecord::Base xss_foliate ... end I haven't found a solution to the 2nd point, but would be ...


4

If you want to set text, use .text(). The entities in the attribute’s value are already interpreted, and ""><svg/onload=alert(3)>" is the value of the attribute. $(".somediv").text($("#myinput").val()); $('#destination').text($('#source').attr('title')); <script ...


1

You cant close a confirm dialog by code because that method was made to confirm/reject a sentence. It will return you a boolean. Thats all.


0

Take a look at this answer to "Why use Microsoft AntiXSS library?" for a hint to get you started.


1

I believe the person is referring to cross site scripting attacks. They tagged this as php, security, and xss take for example <input type="text" value=""><script>alert(0)</script><""> The above code will execute the alert box code; <?php $var= "\"><script>alert(0)</script><\""; ?> <input type="text" ...


2

If your question is "what types of xss-attacks are possible" then you better google it. I'll just leavev some examples of why you should sanitize your inputs If input is generated by echo '<input type="text" value="$var">', then simple ' breaks it. If input is plain HTML in PHP page then value=<?php deadly_php_script ?> breaks it If this is ...


19

There really are two questions that you're asking (or at least can be interpreted): Can the quoted value attribute of input[type="text"] be injected if quotes are disallowed? Can an arbitrary quoted attribute of an element be injected if quotes are disallowed. The second is trivially demonstrated by the following: <a ...


0

You might display the HTML from attachments in a sandboxed iframe. It has the following advantages: the sandbox itself reduces impact of any malicious code in the attachment, you can set a separate CSP header for the iframe URL and it will not impact the outer HTML, where you need to allow inline code.



Top 50 recent answers are included