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1

I think you can safely mark this as a false positive when your users are using modern browsers. Setting content disposition to download the response as an attachment should prevent any scripting from being executed in the browser. It appears that Veracode has not picked up the fact that you are doing this. Note that old browsers like IE 6/7 will ignore the ...


1

Potentially Dangerous HTML Tags: While not an exhaustive list, the following commonly used HTML tags could allow a malicious user to inject script code: <applet> <body> <embed> <frame> <script> <frameset> <html> <iframe> <img> <style> <layer> <link> <ilayer> <meta> ...


0

A common security issue with redirects are "open redirects" where basically an attacker can take advantage of a flaw in your page to get a user redirected to some other site of his/her choice. In your specific case it seems that you don't use any user supplied parameter to define the target URL of the redirect, so you should be safe from this attack.


3

You need to loop over the arrays. $entries = array_map('htmlentities', $_POST['entries']); $username = htmlentities($_POST['username']); $message = array_map('htmlentities', $_POST['message']); or to include ENT_QUOTES you can use: $entries = array_map(function($x) { return htmlentities($x, ENT_QUOTES); }, $_POST['entries']); and similarly for ...


0

There's a nice write up to the solution to level4 here http://www.behindthefirewalls.com/2014/06/xss-game-by-google-exercises-4-5-and-6.html


0

Your version of firefox is encoding the request, but what about older versions or other browsers? The bottom line is that if you have found XSS, it doesn't matter how it can be exploited, it just needs to be fixed.


1

If you want to prevent 'javascript:' protocol links, you can check with a regular expression that ensures that only http: https: or a relative url is used. It is best to white-list the allowed protocols rather than prevent forbidden ones. The encodeURIComponent function is for adding parameters to the query string of the URI which is not what I think you ...


1

As I see it, there are two main options: You can make a whitelist of allowed parameters, and don't bother with actually doing anything with the actual url being passed. In other words, you'd do something like ?url=example and have that redirect to http://www.example.com if it is in the whitelist. To be clear, these are aliases, not a rule where you just ...


2

It depends on where the injection goes. Here is an example of XSS without the forbidden characters: Let's say a page receives a picture file name and displays it, and does not encode the quote character: https://contoso.com/displaypic?source=111.jpg <img src="111.jpg"></img> If you access this URL, you have yourself XSS: ...


0

Dont mess filters and interceptors, they are completely different things. In order to make things easier to Struts I'd recommend to use interceptors to prevent XSS attacks. Play with this parameter within the Action Context. If you prefer to use filters, you will have to re-introduced modified variable in the request, that's imho not a good practice.


1

Do I need to escaping html output in input field? Yes, every input must be escaped. Especially if it comes from the user. You should never ever trust user's input. htmlspecialchars has some sort of a bug where you can't directly include strings in it's second and third parameter. Therefore a workaround is needed. As of PHP 5.4+ the default charset is ...


1

Your right about using htmlspecialchars(). Here is an example which works: <input type="text" value="<?php echo htmlspecialchars('<script type="text/javascript">alert("Xss done");/script>') ?>"/> which produces <input type="text" value="&lt;script type=&quot;text/javascript&quot;&gt;alert(&quot;Xss ...


2

You'll need to break out your copy of Netscape 4 to reproduce it. Newer versions of Netscape (and every other browser) do not allow that use of the & operator.


2

For this, I would use the bleach module - documentation here Bleach takes care of sanitizing your HTML tags and HTML-escaping the "unsafe" tags. Here's a sample program illustrating how you might use bleach: #!/usr/bin/env python from bs4 import BeautifulSoup import bleach def sanitizeHTML(value): soup = ...


1

Struts2 creates a map of parameters from the request using request.getParameterMap() and put these parameters to the action context. So, you can create an interceptor that getting these parameters from the context and do what you want. Add a new interceptor to all actions either using custom stack or overridden action config.


0

CSP does protect against this by default. As you said it's hard to tell the true origin of such content to CSP solves this by forbidding inline scripts (including things like onclick="" attributes) by default. There are only two ways to use an inline script: Specifying 'unsafe-inline' which disables the protection. Or by specifying a nonce or hash to ...


5

1. Kudos for using prepared statements! 2. Read below Overall this looks quite good from a security standpoint but you are most certainly going to run into issues by using htmlentities() everywhere. With your logic, if I want to use a password like ThisIsSo<Secu>r then your code is going to convert it to it to ThisIsSo&lt;Secu&gt;r so it ...


0

I used XSSAPI's encodeForJS method which solved my problem


2

I am not going to get into what this does prevent, but I will address some of what it allows through. Let's say your filter takes a string, and returns a string with all of the < replaced with empty strings. Ignoring that you could mess up this implementation if you are not careful. If you inject un-trusted data into html attributes or javascript ...


1

You could read the raw input data in order to bypass the filter, but you shouldn't do that. The 'global_xss_filtering' setting does automatic XSS filtering on input, which is a bad practice and that's why this feature is DEPRECATED in CodeIgniter 3. Don't enable global XSS filtering; escape everything manually on output; and please, unless that form of ...


0

I see why I got down vote now... &amp; is the same as &, thanks to @Bergi . The bug is somewhere else, where it's encoded twice as &amp;&amp; and breaks the link.


0

Use encodeURIComponent(userInput);


0

I use JSTL for the purpose. Include c prefix in the jsp page, <%@ taglib uri="http://java.sun.com/jsp/jstl/core" prefix="c"%> For the value you want to show <c:out value=${someVar} escapeXml="true" /> Setting the attribute excapeXml="true" is optional in this scenario because its default value is true Oracle Documentation


1

Mine is a somewhat controversial opinion, but I think you should validate and reject inbound XSS. You should escape it on output too, but it shouldn't be in your database in the first place, as dbs are long-lasting and often cross-application. See https://www.owasp.org/index.php/OWASP_JSON_Sanitizer Use Hibernate Validator (you don't need to use Hibernate ...


1

You can specify a Content Security Policy to prevent any inline JavaScript from executing. See here for browser compatibility. It is also recommended to run any user input through an HTML sanitizer too, as this will help protect browsers without CSP support. Using BBcode or something like MarkDown is also recommended, rather than allowing users to enter ...


3

Unfortunately this isn't really possible. The reason that that doesn't work is because the error stops that script from executing, but doesn't stop all scripts on the page from executing. If you're trusting HTML input from the user, you're simply going to have XSS vulnerabilities, unless you try to parse their input and remove anything that could cause a ...


1

SOLUTION Use the following code to encode HTML tags and entities: dataString = $('<div/>').text(data).html(); DEMO See this jsFiddle for code and demonstration.


0

Answer: You are obviously outputting raw user input ($_GET['tid'] in your case) somwhere on your page without "cleaning" it from special HTML characters. "> part closes some previously opened HTML tag on your page, <img src=x onerror=alert(document.cookie)> inserts img tag with invalid source, which will cause loading error, triggering ...


0

The following vulnerabilities are present with user controlled CSS and allowing style attributes and style tags: The use of an inline STYLE="..." parameter attached to HTML tags of any type; attributes specified this way apply to this and nested tags only (and largely defeat the purpose of the entire scheme when it comes to making it easy to ...


-1

Store string using htmlentities($str). It would convert html entities to character code.


1

Take what ever the user entered and hash it, then use the hash as the password. That way the user has no control over the exact password. Better yet use PBKDF2, it is designed to create derived keys from a password.


0

This isn't a traditional HTML/script injection into the DOM, so it's not what people typically call “DOM XSS”, but AppScan has detected it because data is going from an untrusted source (the document URL) to a dangerous sink (the security-sensitive document.domain property), and that is in general a risky thing to do. If an attacker can influence ...


0

It just seems like a subdomain parsing routine that sets document.domain to this value for inter-origin communication. e.g. if the current URL is http://www.example.com/ then document.domain is set to example.com. This appears to be a false positive because even though untrusted input is being used to set the domain in order to loosen Same Origin Policy ...


2

Because strip_tags doesn't fix every possible abuse case. True, it fixes the worst offenders, but there are other cases, e.g. when inserting values back into <input> tags yourself, where the quotes can be broken out of. Consider: <input type="text" value="my string" /> If my string comes from some other data source that isn't XSS-protected, it ...


1

The original Parsedown library has an option to escape html: echo Parsedown::instance() ->setMarkupEscaped(true) # escapes markup (HTML) ->text("<div><strong>*Some text*</strong></div>"); # Output: # <p>&lt;div&gt;&lt;strong&gt;<em>Some ...


2

If you take a look at the Markdown specification (either the original syntax by Jon Gruber or CommonMark), you'll find that Markdown is not supposed to replace HTML. Its only goal is to make it easier to read the text you write. Since Markdown only covers a small subset of HTML tags, you can still use HTML code inline to create exactly what you want. In ...


-2

Accepting user input and integrating it seemless with the applications code can never be secure. It is a no go. If this is just about displaying the code, then you can do so using a <textinput> tag for example. You can style it such that it does not look like an input. Or you simply use a function like htmlescape() in combination with a <pre> ...


0

You should really try http://htmlpurifier.org/ It is good library, designed to prevent XSS, and it still allows some tags like <br>, <b>, <i> and other safe tags.


0

Why does (only) 10 and 12 fail? application/json can be serialized to text if the browser knows the source How come 3, 4, 7 and 8 are not considered insecure? The data is transferred from client to client, not client to server Why does it always work with the mime set to text? The setData method of the dataTransfer object accepts text and ...


0

Nope, HTML Purifier doesn't support this use-case.


1

Grave accents have no special meaning within HTML so are not an XSS attack vector there (unless you embed them in a context where they do have special meaning, but I can't think of any such contexts supported by HTML).


0

Encoding to prevent attacks in the XSS family depends on the contextual syntax into which you're injecting user-supplied content. If you're dropping content into JavaScript source, then no, you cannot use HTML escapes because HTML syntax is completely different than JavaScript syntax. Similarly, if you're including user-supplied content in HTML, you can't ...


0

Can the same character encoding used for html encoding be used for javascript? No. HTML is not JavaScript. are there any built in javascript encoding apis? The only languages mentioned in the question tags are JavaScript and HTML. You should never generate JavaScript source code programatically from inside JS (there is always a better way to solve ...


0

As of Rails 3 and the fatty beatdown the Rails core dev team took when they made Rails unsafe by default, all strings are now tagged as either safe or unsafe with "unsafe" strings being the default. You only need to think about explicitly managing the "safeness" of strings in Rails when you're writing helpers that output HTML into your template. Escaping ...


0

Just cut out all the <script> tags and don't execute the string from the <textarea> element (and use single quotes only). Against SQL injection you can use mysqli_real_escape_string to escape all SQL special characters.


0

You can try OWASP Java HTML Sanitizer. It is very simple to use. PolicyFactory policy = new HtmlPolicyBuilder() .allowElements("a") .allowUrlProtocols("https") .allowAttributes("href").onElements("a") .requireRelNofollowOnLinks() .build(); String safeHTML = policy.sanitize(untrustedHTML);


1

According to OWASP every character with ascii value of less than 256 is ok. What? No. XSS prevention depends on context! I'm also very sure that OWASP doesn't regard every ASCII value less than 256 as okay, since ASCII is only defined for characters 0 - 127. I also don't want some very generic solution such as sanitizing each param by striping it's ...


0

OK, let's use an example. You have a search page that takes a GET parameter for the search query. http://example.com?search=test+search On your search page, you do something like this. <p>your search results for "{search}":</p> This is vulnerable to reflected XSS. The following query: ...


0

You can use request filter and check the content-length in it. If content-length is more than allowed value you can simply return from there only.


6

As with any and all XSS prevention: Don't build HTML from strings, especially not when those strings contain user-supplied values. jQuery has a convenient facility to build elements safely - you can pass in an object with properties: $("<li>", { id: taskID, text: localStorage.getItem(taskID) }).appendTo('#task'); In fact, I recommend that you ...



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