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You should treat user input as plain text rather than HTML. By correctly escaping HTML entities, you can render what looks like valid HTML text without having the browser try to execute it. This is good practice in general, for your client-side code as well as any user provided values passed to your back-end. Issues arising from this are broadly referred to ...


0

There are several ways to address this, but since you haven't mentioned which back-end technology you are using, it is hard to give anything but rough answers. Also, you haven't mentioned if you want to allow, or deny, the ability to enter regular HTML in the box. Method 1: Sanitize inputs on the way in. When you accept something at the server, look ...


4

You can use the flag JSON_HEX_TAG, so that < and > will be encoded as \u003C and \u003E respectively. json_encode($str, JSON_HEX_TAG)


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I think you might have used this: var config = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLDOM"); config.async = false; config.loadXML(xmlhttp.responseText); var read = config.selectNodes("//bookstore/book/page/content")[0]; alert(read);


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You could write your jsp data in a text/json block which will be ignored by the browser: <script id="demo" type="text/json"> ${jspvariable} </script> You can then parse the values in your javascript file on dom ready: console.log(JSON.parse(document.getElementById('demo').innerHTML)); A XSS injection could lead only to a JSON parse error


1

You should implement a Content Security Policy on any pages where you output the rich text in addition to making the text safe for HTML output by using a sanitizer such as HTML Purifier. This should be effective in preventing injected script commands from running. The CSP allows you to effectively stop inline script from being executed by the browser. It is ...


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Without seeing your GET handler, or what you're sending to it, it's tough to say why it behaves that way. However, OOTB MVC guards against SQL injection through the use of Entity Framework, and against XSS through ModelState validation. Inside the body of your POST action that handles this forms submission you'll want to use code much like the following: ...


2

Rule #1 of programming for the Internet: Never trust anything from the client. EVER. Rule #2 of programming for the Internet: Never trust anything from the client. EVER. Rule #3 of programming for the Internet: You can not make the client trustworthy. I know the first rule is duplicated twice, but it is worth it. There is simply no way to do what you ...


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One way to solve the problem would be to configure your server to escape interpolation in user-generated content. This can be done with the \ character. {{something}} becomes \{\{something\}\} You can read more about that here: https://docs.angularjs.org/api/ng/service/$interpolate If this solution doesn't suit you, you could use a simple decorator to ...


1

The method htmlspecialchars is not perfect. Take a look at htmlpurifier. It is way more powerfull through whitelist filter. With it, your users can write html (such as <p>), and you don't have the risk of XSS. consider, to use this, before you store it in the database, so you don't need to santize your input on every page view.


1

This is not a problem, you just didn't select a correct function for your task. the htmlspecialchars() doesn't remove tags, it just transforms them so they are displayed instead of being executed. So, for example, <p> becomes &lt;p&gt;. If you want to (partially) remove the tags, use the strip_tags() function. And, if you don't need these tags, ...


1

If you want to display only text, or even control which tags are converted/removed you have the option of using strip_tags. echo strip_tags($title, '<p>'); Would display your title without having your p tags displayed. Edit: Also realize that even by allowing tags you also allow certain attributes to function normally which wouldn't keep you safe ...


0

Actually no input checking is done, but it is captcha protected. Never trust the client. Therefore the answer is: Validate and sanitize all user/client inputs before processing/accepting (before its persisted in some way, e.g. db). All you're doing is with CAPTCHA is mitigating replay/robots. Anyone can enter anything in your implementation. An ...


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No, this code won't catch 'pretty much any malicious code that a user can enter into a comment field'. It's totally wrong. What if user want to write for example '3 < 4' in his comment? You wont accept it? Or just script word, it's totally safe. Something more the script tag is not the only way to make XSS attack. (Check this link if you are interested) ...


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This usually means that part of the response has already been written, so it's too late to add headers.


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You have to decide what type of content you are receiving from the outside, and handle it appropriately before sending it to any browser. If you consider it's text, then: if it's output as part of text within the HTML, you should appropriately escape at least < and & by replacing everything that is necessary with the correct HTML entities if it's ...


0

Essentially, you have to escape the string in order to prevent XSS. A good guide is at: https://www.owasp.org/index.php/XSS_%28Cross_Site_Scripting%29_Prevention_Cheat_Sheet You didn't mention which server and/or client-side frameworks you are using. But essentially, you have to escape the string provided to you by the user to encode the <, > &, and ...


0

The script you add with append or innerHtml won't be executed unless you use eval(). So it's not violating CSP. Although this may look like a cross-site scripting attack, the result is harmless. HTML5 specifies that a tag inserted via innerHTML should not execute. 1 See script elements inserted using innerHTML do not execute when they are inserted.


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Is there no way to display as is yet prevent the url from actually working (xss working)? Yes, there is: do not place it within an anchor tag. If filtering URLs were as easy as passing it through a native PHP function that could magically display one type of URL in a clickable anchor tag, and another type of URL as unclickable in an anchor tag, XSS ...


1

Yes, XSS threats do exists when using SVG, most browsers will not allow the script to run, but if it is sent via email then it could potentially run. Some links to issues: Scalable Vector Graphics and XSS Why does this XSS vector work in svg but not in HTML? SVG Fun Time - Firefox SVG Vector + Bypassing Chrome XSS Auditor PDF About Dangerous SVG


0

I'm not sure if this question has since been answered, but I encountered it today so thought I'd share my finding. The problem was, the AntiXss encoder was (rightly) encoding newlines and carriage returns; these however weren't correctly being rendered. After doing a quick bit of research, I discovered that we can use the preformatted (pre) tag to ensure ...


0

Late to the game here but others may find this-- we had a similar setup and issue where everything worked fine until the application started using ajax posts which did redirects for the response. The fix was to use mod_header in apache to rewrite redirects using "Header edit Location" http://httpd.apache.org/docs/current/mod/mod_headers.html Header edit ...


3

You should implement a Content Security Policy on any pages where you output the rich text. This allows you to effectively stop inline script from being executed by the browser. It is currently supported by modern browsers such as Chrome and Firefox. This is done by a HTTP response header from your page. e.g. Content-Security-Policy: script-src 'self' ...


1

ModelState.IsValid means that all the validations etc which you have used in your model class is valid or not.. for ex:- public class Emp { [Required] public int EmpCd { get; set; } } So if during post EmpCd has null or string value it will make ModelState as Invalid.. This is basically used if you manage to avoid the UI unobtrusive client ...


0

If you have already passed the input through htmlspecialchars (which you are doing, right?) then it is already impossible for the links to contain any characters that could cause XSS. If you have not already passed the input through htmlspecialchars, then it doesn't matter what filtering you do when parsing the links, because you're already screwed, because ...


0

According to OWASP: ... HTML entity encoding doesn't work if you're putting untrusted data inside a tag anywhere, or an event handler attribute like onmouseover, or inside CSS, or in a URL. So even if you use an HTML entity encoding method everywhere, you are still most likely vulnerable to XSS. You MUST use the escape syntax for the part of the HTML ...


0

In your browser, open the console. If this is not already the case load JQuery: var scr = document.createElement('script'); scr.setAttribute('src', 'https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.11.1/jquery.min.js'); document.body.appendChild(scr); Reload the flash object with modified parameters: $('[name="flashVars"]').html(' <object ...


0

@John's answer is spot on - this is due to the text used in onclick of your button. Check out the OWASP XSS (Cross Site Scripting) Prevention Cheat Sheet for tips on how to prevent XSS. RULE #3 - JavaScript Escape Before Inserting Untrusted Data into JavaScript Data Values applies here:- Except for alphanumeric characters, escape all characters less ...


1

It looks to me that the problem is how you are generating the value for location.href when your code generates this button: <button type="button" onclick= "location.href='/stagedmds/marketshare/ParmsV2.asp?<<<<<<<<<<foo"bar'314 >>>>>=1&Doc=Y';" ONMOUSEOVER="this.className = 'over';" ...


0

XSS usually refers to when someone is able to insert HTML into your page, which can happen when you output user input without encoding it first. To prevent that, use htmlspecialchars() when you output user input. I sometimes define two functions like this: function he($s) { return htmlspecialchars($s, ENT_QUOTES, "UTF-8"); } function eh($s) { echo ...


0

I found a good article on when to use the backbone escape function. The author asserts that you should always use escape, apart from when you are definitely not going to be executing the value of a model attribute. For example if you were checking a model attribute was not null: var model = new Backbone.Model({foo: "Bar"}); if (model.get("foo") != null) { ...


3

Use REReplace or REReplaceNoCase functions to remove unwanted characters (specified as regular expression) from a string: #REReplace(";,&,<,>,`,',!,@,$,%,(,),=,+,{,},[,],\", "[;&<>`'!@$%()=+{}[\]\\,""]*", "", "ALL")# ReplaceList function is useful in case if you need to replace certain values from one list with corresponding values ...


2

You can get rid of the empty list elements like this: NewList = ArrayToList(ListToArray(OldList));


0

The former is done by updating your hosts file on your local machine to point old.com to something else, this overrides what the internet DNS states. The latter very much depends on how your application is build and there is not enough info here.


0

You can disable IE's XSS filter on a per-page basis by sending the following HTTP header. X-XSS-Protection: 0


0

The only way around it without modifying browser settings is to set up a proxy script on your server that will forward data to http://validator.w3.org/check using libcurl and print the result. This way all cross-site traffic is moved to the server side where there are no such restrictions. There are other options, such as setting up your own local copy of ...


0

I think Fortify has found that event.getCurrencyCode() could be any length string and may contain a cross-site scripting attack that might send an unsuspecting user to a malicious site or cause the browser to load JavaScript that does bad things to the user. You might be able to tell this by looking at the details tab of the finding in Fortify's Audit ...


1

X-XSS-Protection: 1 : Force XSS protection (useful if XSS protection was disabled by the user) X-XSS-Protection: 0 : Disable XSS protection The token mode=block will prevent browser (IE8+ and Webkit browsers) to render pages (instead of sanitizing) if a potential XSS reflection (= non-persistent) attack is detected. /!\ Warning, mode=block creates a ...


0

if you still have problem, look at: https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/topics/templates/#automatic-html-escaping Django should automaticly escape html code, unless you tell not to do it.


1

I just saw this on a site that I manage. The script is encoded but it's fairly easy to find out what it expands to: $ curl https://d1ui18tz1fx59z.cloudfront.net/js/all/pd2.js?v=18 > raw.js $ sed -i 's/eval/console.log/' raw.js $ node raw.js [lots of output] I then fed the output into http://jsbeautifier.org/ and got ...


0

The Django template that renders the original page is also used to render content for infinite scroll (partial view). Therefore you are safe. If all you are doing is rendering content that you have control of and already trust for your initial page load, then there will be nothing malicious in the page source to be rendered. In this case as you are ...


-1

Update Use this line before passing the HTML into the jQuery it will remove any scripts (including onmouseover etc.) that are included in the HTML: var cleansed = str.replace(/<script\b[^<]*(?:(?!<\/script>)<[^<]*)*<\/script>/gmi, ""); cleansed = cleansed.replace(/\bon\w+\s*=[\s\S]*?>/gmi, ">"); I still say that the ...


0

There's no automatic attribute available for this, you'll have to do some work yourself. I'm not sure if you already know about the Microsoft Web Protection Library. It includes the AntiXSS component (NuGet link), which seems ideal for what you want. This OWASP article contains a lot of useful information and Haacked has a tutorial on how to use it. ...


0

To prevent reflected and stored XSS you need to escape/encode part of the response from the server (output fields). Some encoding inside the browser page itself could be useful only against DOM XSS but this is a more rare scenario.


0

After googling I end-up at owasp site. It contains nice checklist for REST security & assessment. Links: REST Security and REST Assessment


1

Interesting how this is being implemented years later by google and them removing the URL all together in order to prevent XSS attacks and other malicious acitivites


1

PHP's mysqli_real_escape_string is an option but I prefer solutions like preg_replace Stop there. It's clear by this statement, your question, and the question tags that you don't understand what escaping is for. Rather than answering your question directly, let me try to explain it. mysqli_real_escape_string() escapes strings for SQL. All this ...


1

The correct way to handle this is to set the text. $('#abc').text('What <ever> you & want;'); Then, no escaping is necessary.



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