New answers tagged

-1

You should write what you have tried and why it did not work. My initial thought would be '><img src=x onerror=alert(1)>


0

You should encode rather than filter. Sounds like the " ends the value attribute of the input tag. See the OWASP XSS prevention cheat sheet.


0

htmlspecialchars is ok but not completely safe to insert into mysql. For mysql it's better to use prepared statements, such as explained here: http://bobby-tables.com/php.html For output in the page (without inserting on database), htmlspecialchars is enough... provided you don't decode those before printing. Like CBroe suggested, You could use ...


3

As per PHP manual, htmlspecialchars performs the following translations: '&' (ampersand) becomes '&amp;' '"' (double quote) becomes '&quot;' when ENT_NOQUOTES is not set. "'" (single quote) becomes '&#039;' (or &apos;) only when ENT_QUOTES is set. '<' (less than) becomes '&lt;' '>' (greater than) becomes ...


1

You're talking about CSRF not XSS. The recommended way to prevent CSRF is to use the Synchronizing Token Pattern. Putting session ids in the URL is a bad idea. It means you can't bookmark or share URLs safely.


2

my comments in answer form: 20 years ago the & and " (rather than &amp; and &quot;) may have broken some browsers when rendering the html, but nowadays they're able to handle it OK (&amp; & &quot; are correct though). PHP variables may contain any arbitrary string (binary data even).. there's no issue with a var containing ' or ". ...


0

All those unsupported commands are ModSecurity v1 commands and have been completely rewritten for ModSecurity2. The rule you would want would be something like this: SecRule ARGS "<( |\n)*script" "phase:2,id:1234,deny" This basically scans any of your arguments (as parameters or the body) for items like this: <script or < script or < ...


0

You could use watij, but you have to write all your 'exploits' by hand and I doubt that you will have a great coverage of all possibilities doing it that way. If you really want to pentest your application you should use something like metasploit. Yes, I know it's not java, but if you really want to know what the tool does you have the possibility to ...


0

I don't think it will give you precisely what you are looking for, but have you evaluated BurpPro? Burp has an Extension API that might allow you the flexibility that you are seeking. In general, I find Burp to be an excellent application pen testing tool, preferring it to the much more expensive commercial application vuln scanners as well as the open ...


0

i used that pass array or get , post function cleanme(&$array) { if (isset($array)) { foreach ($array as $key => $value) { if (is_array($array[$key])) { secure_array($array[$key]); } else { $array[$key] = strip_tags(mysql_real_escape_string(trim($array[$key]))); ...


1

This is Not Vulnerable to XSS, Whatever you are writing in the URL is Coming in Below Form section ( Vraag/opmerking ) . And the Double Quotes (") are Escaped. If you try another Payload like <script>alert(/xss/)</script> That Also won't work, Because this is Not Reflecting neither Storing. You will see output as a Text in Vraag/opmerking. Don't ...


0

No. You can stay relaxed. Some problem can rarely exists if you try to eval the variable as code, but is not your case. The main security problem of global variables reside in the year-ago-popular directive register_globals (removed as of PHP 5.4.0): with this option active, all GET and POST variables were converted in global variables (i.e. $_GET['user'] ...


0

You can use the Rails 4 sanitize method to strip out tags that are not "whitelisted" by default by rails. So in your controller code you can have: ActionView::Base.new.sanitize("<script>alert('hello')</script>") which would strip out the script tag. You can whitelist your own attributes or elements rather than the default or if you want more ...


2

Use Hibernate Validator's @SafeHtml annotation: https://docs.jboss.org/hibernate/validator/5.2/reference/en-US/html/ch02.html#validator-defineconstraints-hv-constraints You need to add jsoup as a dependency Example: @Entity public class Foo { @SafeHtml(...) private String firstName; } Then if you validate the entity, it will be not valid if ...


2

In the first code, message is an untrusted string which can contain malicious code. Parsing it as HTML may execute that code: var message = '<img src="//" onerror="alert(\'You are pwned!\')" />'; document.write('Your message: ' + message); The second code is different. It's just a function, it doesn't run anything by itself. Of course, if ...


1

The class is located in the voku\helper namespace. Use new \voku\helper\AntiXSS() to instantiate it or use use imports to import the namespace. See php.net for more information about namespaces.


1

The AngularJS frame work is protecting your application from XSS attacks. Cross-site scripting carried out on websites accounted for roughly 84% of all security vulnerabilities documented by Symantec as of 2007. -- Wikipedia - Cross-site scripting So what are you really trying to do? Maybe we can show you how to do it in a safe manner.


0

If your page use any http parameter for output rendering. It's vulnerable to reflected XSS. use any javascript DOM manipulation. It's vulnerable to DOM based XSS. below link may help you. https://www.owasp.org/index.php/Types_of_Cross-Site_Scripting


1

Code Climate is complaining because you're embedding the potentially user-provided redirect_uri in your page. That URI might be JavaScript, which would execute when a user clicks the link. Because the user's clicking a link rendered by your page, the JS has access to the page as if you'd written the code yourself, so someone devious can exfiltrate all sorts ...


0

If you want to prevent XSS attack on the server side with allowing some tags, you can use OWASP HTMLSanitizer(OWASP antisamy is now inactive) and also make your own rules. HTML sanitizer project page: https://www.owasp.org/index.php/OWASP_Java_HTML_Sanitizer_Project Example rule - Ebay rule: ...


0

This response header can be used to configure a user-agent's built in reflective XSS protection. Currently, only Microsoft's Internet Explorer, Google Chrome and Safari (WebKit) support this header. Internet Explorer 8 included a new feature to help prevent reflected cross-site scripting attacks, known as the XSS Filter. This filter runs by default in the ...


0

https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc2046 'text/plain' should not process instruction kind, and is seen simply as a linear sequence of characters.


1

What kind of risk I am incurring if somebody embeds the iframe page in an page that contains malicious code in a field with id "my-data"? Outputting the X-Frame-Options: SAMEORIGIN response header will prevent your framed page from being framed by anyone else (source). Even if they did frame your response, a malicious site would not be able to ...


0

It's very easy, just assign to innerText instead of innerHtml. welcome_parra.innerText = "welcome " + name.value;


3

I think your attempting to prevent CSRF (Cross site request forgery) rather than XSS (Cross site scripting). XSS is preventing people injecting malicious code into you're application e.g. if you have a blog with a comment form, someone could enter a JS <script></script> tag into your comment box, so that when their comment is loaded on your ...


0

The more you allow, the more tricks that a left for clever hackers to inject some nasty code into your webpage. That's why you want to allow as little as possible. See Ruben van Vreeland's lecture How We Hacked LinkedIn & What Happened Next for a good introduction to XSS vulnerabilities and why you want your whitelist to be as strict as possible!


0

I think I understand your question but I don't know why you could only escape one result. You can do: echo "<tr align='center' bgcolor='#0f7ea3'> <td height='25px'>" .htmlspecialchars($results['Website'], ENT_QUOTES)."</td> <td>".htmlspecialchars($results['Keywords'], ENT_QUOTES)."</td> ...


0

newer browsers have already encoded the URL, even if you have disabled XSS-filter, those ""s are still encoded. In order to do POC of your findings like popping up an alert box, you can use older browsers. you can also use IETester, and use IE6 tab to simulate. Please note alert box may not be working in IEtester, you can use "confirm" instead


1

I dont think there's a need to merge :format and :filename into params. This will lead two major complications. Someone can modify the querystring, leaving doors to security vulnarability. Having userdefined symbols at runtime and merging them with params, also leaves a door for DoS(Denial of Service) attack. (you may google about these issues for ...


-1

This comment is not a "fix", but it sheds some light on the issue. Unless I am mistaken, this issue only seems to effect sites loaded through standard http but not those loaded securely through https. In other words, Firefox will recognize the escaped values... but only when the site is loaded through https and not http. http://domain may not load ...


0

In order to make it secure, don't do anything in the parent, delete the textbox and move everything to the iframe page: <div id="my-data"> <?php echo $myData; ?> </div> ... wherever you get $myData from, needs to be put here as well.


3

well, basically, I used bindParam, and while inserting, it remove the scripts tags Your assumption is wrong. You have JavaScript embedded in HTML, which in turn is embedded in SQL. Each of those languages have different escaping schemes, and pose different risks. bindParam deals only with SQL injection, i.e. the outermost layer. It does not deal with ...


2

Yes, your code is vulnerable to XSS. In fact, letting users run arbitrary javascript is pretty much the definition of an XSS vulnerability. The fact that it's intentional instead of accidental doesn't make it less vulnerable. If all you want is an object of settings, there's no reason to allow arbitrary javascript when you can just use JSON . JSON.parse ...


2

You could block their IP addresses with your firewall. Searching for "fail2ban" and the name of your server should turn up some tutorials on how to automate this process. If you notice the majority of the attacks are from a certain area, blocking IP addresses by region (geoIP) is also an option.



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