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0

You could always implement a Captcha You don't necessarily need to use it on every post. You can use it on forms if user posts more than x amount of times in n amount of seconds/minutes. Sort of like what StackOverflow does.


1

I don't think that this is possible. However with Firefox and Chrome, calling window.close() only has an effect on windows which were opened with Javascript. Older versions of MSIE (5,6) close the window regardless, I don't know about more recent versions.


0

xss_clean() Provides Cross Site Script Hack filtering. This function is an alias to the one in the Input class. More info can be found there.


0

Why aren't you just using the standard ASP.NET error handling approach of custom errors in the web config and defining a custom error page? If you want to log the exception in your global.asax add the method Application_Error which will be called on an unhandled exception (see code example below). If you don't call "Server.ClearError()" then ASP.NET will ...


0

Nope. A parametrized query protects against SQL Injection; that is it ensures query parameters are well formed and correctly escaped prior to processing by the SQL back end. XSS is a different class of problem whereby input should be sanitized of HTML markup; given that a correctly parametrized SQL value can still contain markup, you need additional ...


0

The only part of your posted code that could lead to an XSS vulnerability is document.getElementById("test").innerHTML = layout; If you are setting innerHTML and you have any HTML in your layout variable that could be user controlled then this could be an attack vector. However, in this case layout appears to be one of either mobile, tablet, desktop or ...


-1

You could use https://pypi.python.org/pypi/bleach in order to sanitize (sort of) your input data


2

There is no built-in functionality in Django for this. There is neither a library I am aware of. The built in safe HTML filter escapes both attribute and non-attribute payload, so probably an additional filter function for attributes only would be required. You can suggest this by opening a feature request against Django in the Django issue tracker. I am ...


0

You can't put the NOT inside the function call like that. This is more in line with what you were trying to do. #iif(NOT HTMLEditFormat(url.excludeFinalized),de(" disabled"),de("")))# But if HTMLEditFormat(url.excludeFinalized) can't be resolved as a Boolean value, you're going to get a runtime error.


0

I may be because to prevent Cross-Site Scripting


0

I believe you need this change: #iif((not url.excludeFinalized),de(HTMLEditFormat(" disabled")),de("")) )# Your original code wraps HTMLEditFormat around a condition. And there's no need to HEF() and empty string, so you still have just one usage of HTMLEditFormat. I don't think you need HTMLEditFormat at all, to be honest. I think. Didn't test this ...


0

If you want to be safe from these types of Injections, you must specify a Content-Type. Try to put the Content-Type in headers instead of meta tags if possible. If you want to do it in php, you can do <?php header('Content-Type: text/html;charset=utf-8'); at the top of your php application. If for some reasons you can't do it, you can put it in ...


0

Without knowing much about the tool itself, it appears to be trying to exit or "break out of" various tags and attributes: --> is used to end an HTML comment. An attacker might try to exit a comment in order to execute Javascript on the page, as JavaScript inside an HTML comment will not execute " and ' are used to delimit HTML attributes or JavaScript ...


1

whether XSS is still possible today. Yes, it is. will only work, if the host has a page where it echoes content from the URL parameters. XSS is possible when any user input is output (either immediately (for a reflected attack) or later, possible to a different person (for a stored attack). That is what XSS is. The Same Origin Policy (and ...


0

An old thread but maybe this will be useful for other users. There is a maintained security layer tool for php: https://github.com/PHPIDS/ It is based on a set of regex which you can find here: https://github.com/PHPIDS/PHPIDS/blob/master/lib/IDS/default_filter.xml


0

If i am not mistaken you can use http://browsershots.org/ or something similar to test it. Example test: http://browsershots.org/requests/12461378


0

I think all browsers escape the urls except those haveing bugs and not following RFCs (RFC3986).


0

XSS is not a threat for static state. XSS is a threat where content from a malicious user is able to be viewed by other users. A simple example is a Facebook post or Twitter post that maliciously embeds javascript so that it executes when others view it on their time line. In an individual static page this is not a threat. The way it can be a threat is if ...


1

There would be no XSS on a simple page; unless you use javascript to parse page arguments and embed them into the page (say, "Wrong password for email@address.com", where email@address.com is from the input field and is not sanitized properly).


1

var sval = val.replace(/&/g, '&amp;').replace(/</g, "&lt;").replace(/>/g, "&gt;");


3

Try using regular expressions: var sval = val.replace(/&/g, '&amp;'); sval = sval.replace(/</g, "&lt;"); sval = sval.replace(/>/g, "&gt;"); The g flag (=global) tells the replace function to not stop after the first hit.


2

Use g as third parameter to remove all occurance var sval = val.replace('&', '&amp;','g') .replace("<", "&lt;",'g') .replace(">", "&gt;",'g'); // g represents global match Documentation : replace()


0

The problem wasn't with defending against CSRF or XSS in the form. The problem was the error page printing out an unsanitized string of the viewstate after the error occurred.


0

A lot depends on where the injection lands, but a simple example would be <a href="&#x6a;&#x61;&#x76;&#x61;&#x73;&#x63;&#x72;&#x69;&#x70;&#x74;&#x3a;&#x61;&#x6c;&#x65;&#x72;&#x74;&#x28;&#x31;&#x29;">XSS</a> which is an html encoded payload javascript:alert(1) which ...


1

The best way probably would be to display site in an iframe like that: echo "<iframe src=\"$url\"></iframe>"; This way user loads the page directly from the url, without your server proxying it. However, since you're displaying information from another site, your site will always be vulnerable to XSS unless you remove scripts and HTML ...


0

Of course you are opened to xss exploits. To prevent from XSS attacks, you just have to check and validate / escape properly all data, dont allow html or javascript code to be inserted from that url. Use htmlspecialchars() to convert HTML characters into HTML entities. So characters like <> that mark the beginning/end of a tag are turned into html ...


0

You have to escape appearing special characters like white space, parentheses, single quotes and double quotes with a backslash: '('


0

Is escaping the quotes enough? No, you also should worry about backslashes and newlines. Here is the CSS grammar for a double quoted URI: http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS21/grammar.html#scanner "([^\n\r\f\\"]|\\{nl}|{escape})" where {nl} is \n|\r\n|\r|\f and {escape} is a backslash-escaped character. So a trailing backslash will break your CSS. A ...


1

No to the first question, and no to the second question. You can't bind params or results to a non-lvalue. The argument for binding must be a variable that can be a PHP reference. The return value of a function does not qualify. You shouldn't process content with htmlentities() before inserting into the database, because it will store literal html entities ...


2

No. As this example perfectly illustrates, Javascript (or any scripting) has no place in CSS, therefore XSS (the second S is for 'Scripting') is not possible. CSS should be declarative only, and is when implemented conforming to the W3 standards. Dynamic expressions are now done with calc which can only evaluate simple mathematical expressions, without ...


0

Unfortunately the existing answer is incorrect, and ivy_lynx's comment doesn't really address the question. Fortify On Demand is reporting a data flow vulnerability. This is a case where some data originates anywhere except from the programmer - and is reflected to the unaware end user's browser. The potentially dangerous data comes from: ...


0

Your script can be hacked by HTML entitys: Example: The input is "Hello" but in code it is &#72;&#101;&#108;&#108;&#111;. If you now run a preg_match you will not find anything var_dump(preg_match('/Hello/i','&#72;&#101;&#108;&#108;&#111;')); // returns int 0 If you want to prevent sql ...


2

Veracode cleansing solution: coldfusion.runtime.CFPage.HTMLEditFormat  The recommended solution tells you what to do. Wrap any variables which contain user supplied data that you utilize in your code in #HTMLEditFormat()#. <td class="left">#HTMLEditFormat(getEmailRecord.EMAIL_TO)#</td></tr> HTMLEditFormat Description Replaces ...


0

Rather than trying to sanitise the input, you really ought to change that other site to make sure it html-escapes the data it is presenting from the database. Even if you would "sanitise" things on the Ember side, can you guarantee there are no other vulnerabilities which allow someone to inject HTML in the database? Always escaping anything being presented ...


0

Handlebars automatically sanitizes strings. If you want to avoid this, you must explicitly use the triple-brace syntax: {{{myHtmlString}}}


1

Keep the rule of thumb: Do Not Trust What You Get From Users. It's not necessarily < and >. To test this use firefox interceptor to bypass client side javascript validation, change text values to say for eg "%3E%22%27%3E%3Cscript%3Ealert%2830%29%3C%2Fscript%3E" and send the request. If you are just checking for < and > then you might end up ...


1

You are very wrong. Escaping is context dependent. Just disallowing < and > results in a lot of broken things. For example: Unquoted Attributes <a class={{var}}> Imagine that var contains foo onclick="alert('hi');" Boom, injected. But even if you escape quotes, you'll have weird attributes. So you need to be sure to always quote ...


1

If you HTML encode the user input while displaying you should be safe. In this case, malicious code, for example a script tag, would simply display as-is.


0

Is there a particular reason you rebuild this page at all? So long as you are using just the post method of the form on the classic asp page then you should not need to rebuild the form in .NET you could simply read the post response values.


0

Use Server.HTMLEncode() to encode the data written to your page if you're worried about XSS.


0

All the user inputs can be validated and filtered at the client side itself. This will be the most secure way to prevent unauthorized clients or attackers to get access to the server. There are several functions(in PHP, like replace(),stripslashes(),htmlspecialchars_decode() etc..) that can be used to validate the input. SQL-injections, xss(cross-site ...


0

In Apache, you need to edit the config file, this file could be: /etc/apache2/apache2.conf /etc/apache2/httpd.conf In the file you can add these lines at the end to enable HTTP Header XSS Protection: <IfModule mod_headers.c> Header set X-XSS-Protection: "1; mode=block" </IfModule> After that, save changes, and restart apache with: ...


0

It depends on what you do with G. Certainly eval-ing it would be problematic, but why would you do that anyway? In addition to the attack mentioned by @alex, if you insert in into the DOM in one way or another, then that's another attack surface. You should HTML-escape it before inserting it into the DOM, either on the server or the client. If you are ...


1

It would definitely be a security hole. Example, the unknown_data could be 1; alert('xss'). However, if you JSON encoded it using your server-side language, it would be safe to print it there (however it may have encoded attacks in it - deal with it like you normally would depending on its context).


0

Escape all input at point of entry, also use a class based structure. If you have functions which are reused often, also escape here. Any point where the server gets information from the client is a vunerable point, so protect each one you find.



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