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2

After several days of researching the same question, I found several references to the following code: <html> <head> <script type="text/javascript"> function init(){ var extText = window.frames.messageTxt.document.body.lastChild.lastChild.data; extText = extText.replace(/[\r\n]/g," "); document.forms[0].nMessage.value = extText; } ...


1

I stumbled on this question while tracking down a similar issue. Mine turned out to be the fact that the page in question was POSTing its data as JSON, and the default JSON model binder does not perform the ASP.NET request validation. I eventually found a blog post by Imran Baloch describing this known behavior and a work around for it: ...


0

The escape() function was deprecated in JavaScript version 1.5. Use encodeURI() or encodeURIComponent() instead. I'm not sure It'll get you where you want, but may solve at least part of your problem. Have you tried using jQuery (GET/load) instead of plain JS to see if you get the same result ? You have an <option> tag that is not not properly closed ...


0

Well there is no magic solution for this. Just make sure to properly encode all outputs. Microsoft AntiXSS library can help you with that.


0

Below function could be used to encode input data to fix XSS vulnerabilities on javascript /*Using jQuery : the script to escape HTML/JS characters*/ function htmlEncode(value) { if (value) { return $('<div/>').text(value).html(); } else { return ''; } }


0

1) Not exactly sure what discourse is doing here. Because markdown is rendered into HTML, it needs to use the unescaped output. Otherwise the HTML generated from markdown would be escaped. Discourse does seem to have html sanitization within the source code, allthough I'm not sure when it is applied. 2) I would say no. JSON is not an executable format. So ...


0

There are subtle ways in which you can trick IE9 and older into treating JSON as HTML. So even if the server's response has a Content-Type header of application/json, IE will second guess it. This is called content type sniffing, and can be disabled by adding the X-Content-Type-Options: nosniff header. JSON is not an executable format so your understanding ...


1

I am using lz-string library for JS compression whenever placing any data into localStorage. I am just a user of this library - not the compression expert. But this is information which could be found around that tool... The lz-string Goal: lz-string was designed to fulfill the need of storing large amounts of data in localStorage, specifically on ...


0

You cannot prevent the user from inspect the window an editing the page with Firebug or Chrome Dev Tools, that is not possible to prevent. libraries like xssflt.jar what they do is, on the server side, not the client side inspect the user request and look for anything suspicious like unexpected script tags, and remove them before returning the request to ...


-1

use this php function url_encode("string") such as http://www.xxxxx.com/xxx.php?cookie=<?php echo url_encode("$.cookie('PHPSESSID')"); ?>


0

Your URL is setting the value of $_GET['cookie'] to $.cookie('PHPSESSID') in your PHP script, nothing more. How that's handled is up to PHP. Since that looks like JavaScript (specifically, the jQuery Cookie plugin), you could conceivably do echo "<script>{$_GET['cookie']}</script>"; in your PHP to spit it out as JS on the resulting page. As you ...


1

Overwriting default php functionality may not be a good idea since sooner or later foreign code may enter your project that does not conform to your chances. I would go another way and add the call to htmltentities as default function of your templating engine. How do you assign variables to it? For example, I once wrote a small template engine that ...


0

HTML encoding is only one aspect of making your output safe against XSS. For example, if you output a string to JavaScript using this code: <script> var enteredName = '<%=EnteredNameVariableFromServer %>'; </script> You will be wanting to hex entity encode the variable for proper insertion in JavaScript, not HTML encode. Suppose the ...


0

Don't use strip_tags! If a user tries to enter something like The bob said <the-secret>, it will be stripped! htmlentities is unnecessary. You want htmlspecialchars: $input = "<script>alert('ur screwed')</script>"; echo htmlspecialchars($input); Returns &lt;script&gt;alert('ur screwed')&lt;/script&gt;. Decode with ...


1

HTML-encoding is itself one feature an “XSS library” might provide. This can be useful when the platform doesn't have a native HTML encoder (eg scriptlet-based JSP) or the native HTML encoder is inadequate (eg not escaping quotes for use in attributes, or ]]> if you're using XHTML, or @{} if you're worried about cross-origin-stylesheet-inclusion attacks). ...


0

In short unless the API supports CORS or JSONP, you will have to proxy the content through a server you control. The API docs don't mention JSONP or CORS support, so, most likely, this is not supported.


1

No, this header does not allow this. If you want a secure solution, you should implement CORS which will allow you to specify which domains can access content normally protected by the Same Origin Policy by use of a header: Access-Control-Allow-Origin: mystaticdomain.com


0

Look at here : http://docs.angularjs.org/api/ngSanitize/service/$sanitize If you want escape use ng-bind, it ll render the tag without interpretation like that : Hello <b>World</b> not like Hello World ! Do you understand ? so ng-bind is safe because it doesn't care about HTML tags. If you want that your HTML tags be interpreted but safely ...


0

Url adress is always encoded with urlencode function. This function replace all symbols with codes. If you want to prevent xss you should to check you parameter. May be like this (in controller Company): public function editProfile($id) { $id = (int)$id; if($id){ // model code execute - loading DB data } } And in DB query you should ...


0

If you want to just address XSS you donot need ESAPI. Do a strict validation on each user input (form fields) using regular expressions and encode the output before the display. ESAPI will give you complete security controls that an enterprise application should have. There is java implementation exist. I am not sure which language Zend supports to write ...


1

In your PHP template somewhere you will have code like: <a href="<?php echo $uri ?>"> or: echo "<a href=\"$uri\">"; HTML-escaping is missing here, so if a quote character is included in the value in $uri then that URI content escapes the attribute value it is supposed to be contained in, and you get dangerous output: <a ...


2

You should only encode on output, not on input. If a user enters AT&T in your application, this should be stored at AT&T in the database. There is no need to encode it, but of course make sure that you are using parameterised queries which will prevent characters such as ' from breaking out of the SQL command context and causing SQL injection. When ...


3

This is actually harder than it seems, and depends upon circumstances. If the output format is HTML, then the script contents are a special CDATA section, wherein the XML/SGML escapes are not interpreted. If the output format is XML, with XML content type, then the escapes work as expected. Even though it could be possible to patch Chameleon so that it ...


1

From the Chameleon introduction page: By default, the string is escaped before insertion. To avoid this, use the structure: prefix However, that won't escape JavaScript values. Use JSON for that; in your view, use: post_json = (json.dumps(post) .replace(u'<', u'\\u003c') .replace(u'>', u'\\u003e') .replace(u'&', u'\\u0026') ...


0

A quick test is to try the URL http://localhost:3000/cases/1/read?name=<script>alert('foo');</script> If the script executes and an alert popup appears, then XSS is definitely possible. Other XSS patterns are possible too depending on where the name value is output. You should output encode to prevent this type of attack. The encoding to ...


1

Firstly, I think you should put the token interceptor as the first interceptor on your stack. That way, when the token does not match your code is not executed. Secondly, <param name="excludeMethods">*</param> means you are not using this interceptor ever. Lastly, the token interceptor automatically checks the token in the form parameters with ...


2

To be sure about, is it working as expected or not ?, you can send form request with omitted csrf hidden field. In order to do that you can use Tamper Data .It's Firefox plug-in. It captures http request when you click submit button and show content of the request to you. You can change everything in there. So you can omit csrf input from post body with that ...


0

Not necessary. All dependence on which way data shows to user. If you keep in mind, that data can be wrong and for example escape string before output - it will be ok.


0

What about using an object fetched from the controller and passing it to the path helper? def index @some_object = SomeObject.find(params[:id]) [...] end and then in your view use this object to build the route ? link_to(t(".button_text"), main_app.some_path(@some_object), :class => "btn")


1

Reason for that is appending user provided data to the response without any escaping. This is vulnerable to injecting javascript which will get executed in user browser. To avoid such vulnerabilities you should html escape every user supplied data before sending it back. You can use some existing libraries to perform escaping for you like for example ...


1

After much consideration and with the help of other posters in this thread (thank you so much for your help!), I found a first bunch of answers to my questions. I am re-writing my answer here though, because it summarizes the concepts and also gives you some actual code to experiment with. Generally, there are two solutions to this problem: We can either ...


1

We also encountered this issue and filled a bug report: http://code.google.com/p/primefaces/issues/detail?id=6766 Additionally there has been a discussion about this issue in the PrimeFaces forum: http://forum.primefaces.org/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=34678 As a workaround you can use the panel as follows: <p:panel> <f:facet name="header"> ...


0

If you are using javaScript to get the form values you can easily use "\n" to add a new line to the value you want to save; var toSave = FormValue + "\n\n" + "extratext"; Demo here


1

use \n and then after fetching the data from the database and prior to outputting it, replace all the \n with <br />. This way you are still safe for XSS, and you have full control over the output.


0

Not sure if it fits your use case, but there is the ngNonBindable directive: <div ng-non-bindable>This is a {{profile}}</div> Will simply show: This is a {{profile}}


0

Also note that there are certain cleansing functions that Veracode recognizes in Java that have been reviewed and OK'd by Veracode's security team. You can find this list in the Veracode Help Center.


0

Sadly even my bounty did not help to get answers so I took a quick look around to gather some more infos on the issue myself... First... the general problem of XSS Looking at XSS and some related issues/links discusses more the problems than solutions (which is ok). Looking at the related Firefox docs about the JavaScript same-origin policy it becomes ...


0

No, for the HTML body you will also need to encode the & character to prevent an attacker from potentially escaping the escape. Check out the XSS Experimental Minimal Encoding Rules:- HTML Body (up to HTML 4.01): HTML Entity encode < & specify charset in metatag to avoid UTF7 XSS XHTML Body: HTML Entity encode < ...


1

The problem is that 'words' are being passed down to your method, but there is no neutralization of these before they gets used - the words get used 'as-is' so could contain scripts that cause harm. There is a good description explaining this and why it is a problem: http://www.veracode.com/images/pdf/top5mostprevalent.pdf When you are generating this HTML, ...


1

First of all, automated vulnerability scanners can not give a guarantee. So you can not trust their results. I will shortly explain what yo have to do in order to secure your PHP application. 1. Use PDO instead of Native MySQL Library. In order to secure your application agains SQL Injection vulnerability which is one of most critical web application ...


0

If there is user authentication then you should check that, current logged in user is not able to access any other data that is not related to him. Means current user has 3 entry from customers table then he should able to access only those 3 entries. If you are using framework then they have implemented many security features. For example in Zend Framework ...


0

You can use Arachni Scanner. It's an open source tool having both web & cli interface.


0

I found a company that does it, but I haven't tried them: http://lp.checkmarx.com/php-code-security Here are some tips: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/5-helpful-tips-for-creating-secure-php-applications--net-2260


0

In the responseText are HTML tags inserted or is it just text you want to insert/change? s a rule of thumb always sanitize/encode all user input and output that is generated from user input. If it's only text that you're inserting use document.createTextNode (example) and append the text to the element's needed (always encoded also), I would recomend using ...


1

I know this is 3.5yrs after your original question, but you can use the formatter='html' argument to prettify(), encode(), or decode() to produce well-formed HTML.


0

The problem is that you are passing $dest to the index() function but you are attempting to use it in your check_database() function. So either you want to move your switch into the index function or you want to pass $dest to check_database() like function check_database($dest) { //You can use $dest in here } If you want to pass an extra parameter ...


1

This is really a subjective question, but I'll try to take my swing at it. Taking your example above, things could go wrong, for example, if: You accidentally used the same password for the code above as another user on the system. The user may not even be a MySQL user. It could be an SSH account, or even root. In fact, why stop there. Maybe you use the ...


1

This is not an XSS vulnerability, it is Path Traversal. You appear to be using one of the arguments to construct a file path, then read that file. Instead of html encode, you should validate user input used in file path construction. You can consult OWASP Guide to protect your application.


1

The "A potentially dangerous Request.Form value was detected from the client" exception is not just a debug error and is is an error that will propagate on the deployment server. So your users will see this error (or your custom error page) on the live server. To allow for un-sanitized HTML to be successfully bound to your model you may do any of the ...



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