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0

Because you have rendered a Script block on client browser. Irrespective of where you have placed a script block browser runs script.


0

You prevent XSS on the client in the same way that you prevent it on the server. (Note this only protects against input that is directly processed on the client, and not against code that gets submitted to the server and then passed back to a client). Make sure you know what data format any given variable holds Treat any user input including data from ...


3

Actually you simply cannot make any reliable XSS prevention on the client side. The attacker simply disables JavaScript, and all your complicated code is non-existent. Any client-side validation is only for the convenience of the users, nothing more.


0

I did not check this in lower versions at first. When I checked, it was working fine in lower versions < kitkat. Finally I realized the we need to use evaluateJavascript() for executing javascripts post kitkat. When I used this the problem was solved. But till not sure why loadUrl() not support encoding for executing javascripts. Thanks for the support. ...


1

It sounds like you actually need two layers of escaping: HTML-escape the content that you want to concatenate into the HTML on the client XML-escape the content that you're inserting into the XML attribute The HTML-escaping should be done on the client (eg, use .text() instead of .html()). The XML-escaping should be done by your XML library (eg, passing ...


0

You should NEVER edit the core files. Instead, you should just extend the Security class, from the application. Create a file called "MY_Security.php" within ./application/core and extend the Security class.


1

Yes, try extend class from CI_Security and write new function: protected function _do_never_allowed($str) it will be more OOP way. EDIT: CodeIgniter allow you extend core classes. See this link: Extending CodeIgniter Security.php to enable logging


0

There are several problems with your code: Lack of input validation, lack of output encoding, Row-filter injection and lack of understanding the concept of client\Javascript validation. Lets discuss it one by one: The lack of input validation: All of the attacks and problems that I've mentioned above can be fixed using proper input validation. By proper I ...


0

Your javascript code does not return any data here: if (http.readyState==4 && http.status==200) { } It should be if (http.readyState == 4 && http.status == 200) { alert(http.responseText); //or document.write(http.responseText); //or document.getElementById('id').innerHTML = http.responseText; }


1

You should allow any characters in the ASCII character set (although you could allow unicode if you want to take on slightly more complexity, e.g. when using password strength meters). You should set a maximum length of 72 ASCII characters if using bcrypt, as the PHP implementation restricts the hashing to these characters only: Using the PASSWORD_BCRYPT ...


0

The first thing you should always keep in mind is that a request to your server doesn't even need to come from you own website. Just because you are using Javascript on your website, doesnt't mean the request always has to come from Javascript. Every security check should be done on the server side. Adding code in Javascript should only be done to improve ...


1

First, the password strength. This is important to prevent password guessing or brute force attack. The stronger a password is — the better, of course. You can limit it to minimum 10 characters for example and require digits and upper case characters in it. That's quite strong already, but you can also require the use of symbols like !, $, @, #, etc. That ...


0


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If this is an unusual error message in your logs someone was attempting an XSS attack. Luckily the MVC Framework blocks these requests by default.


0

I don't believe that Angular has default whitelist input vaidation, which is what your test exercises. So a user can pretty much input anything they like. This is not surprising - whitelists are very domain specific, and Angular is a framework designed for a wide range of domains. The main defense against XSS is to properly encode all untrusted data (see ...


0

You need to execute the untrusted code in a sanboxed environment. For the web-browsers this includes creating an iframe with the sanbox attribute (see this article), and additionally create a web-worker inside that frame (so that the code runs in a separate thread and doesnot hang up the UI in case if user has submitted something strange). If you need to ...


1

HTML entity encoding is okay for untrusted data that you put in the body of the HTML document, such as inside a tag. It even sort of works for untrusted data that goes into attributes, particularly if you're religious about using quotes around your attributes. But HTML entity encoding doesn't work if you're putting untrusted data inside a tag anywhere, or ...


1

First of all, the correct way to escape output is htmlentities, not htmlspecialchars. Escape ALL output you get from variables, database or user input. This is pretty much all you have to do to escape XSS attacks. You may also consider using strip_tags where it's appropriate. Here you go: <h5> Editing User ...


0

If you are keen on securing your site then the best thing to do is enable request validation on page: <@ Page validateRequest="true" %> Follow the link if you want to enable is across your site: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh882339(v=vs.110).aspx If you want to go on with a more lienient check then encoding the data before displaying ...


2

An iframe is probably currently the best solution. Shadow DOM is a possible answer (in future*). In theory, the outer document will only see the shadow root element, but inside you can put any DOM. In practice, however, shadow DOM is still exposed, just traversed differently. To secure it from inspection, you could override some methods, e.g. ...


0

CSRF attacks are blind. They do session riding and the attacker has no direct control unless he can extract the token via an XSS vulnerability. Normally a session wide token can be used. Rotating tokens per request might be an overkill and could lead to false alarms. I prefer to use tokens per resource with a master session token.


1

Yes, this is perfectly safe. You will just need to ensure the security is part of the php code when needed, by limiting or filtering what it can select (already fine there) and how .json files are validated and stored, once that is addressed you will be fine and your existing solution is perfectly safe. You can also modify .htaccess file to hide folder ...


0

I assume you are sending the edited information to a server, storing it in a database so it's saved and rendered later in a website? And that you want to allow users to use certain HTML code in their input? In that case, you need to implement a "HTML sanitizer" server-side. For PHP there's HTMLPurifier, for Python there's Bleach, Ruby has a sanitize module. ...


0

Update the textContent property on the div, rather than the innerHTML. How are you currently letting the user edit the content of the div? Can you post some code?


0

The Client Cross Site Scripting Attack query finds if the page protects itself against being embedded in an IFrame. It searches for conditions such as: if (top != self) if (top.location != location) if (top.frames.length != 0) and so on. This specific file, I believe, has no such conditions, so it MOST LIKELY does not protect itself, and this is why ...


0

@elsadek suggestion is good. This is a partial answer to your big question. Some of what comes to mind is below but hte list is not enclusive by any means...): 1-Injection (SQL and/or JSON pair injection) 2-Cross site scripting (XSS) 3-Broken Authentication & Session Management 4-Insecure Direct Object Reference 5-Cross Site Request Forgery (CSRF) ...


1

Here's the answer I got from Alex Roichman, Chief Software Architect @ Checkmarx: Cross-site history manipulation is a browser same origin policy breach where it’s possible to know a state of a condition from another origin. For example, many sites check if a user was authenticated prior to showing them his private data. This can be done by following code: ...


0

I think the best solution here is not to sanitize Bob's input, but sanitize it before displaying to Alice. Thus even if there is some malicious code entered by Bob, it will never get executed before displaying. So, just do something like this: Bob enters malicious message and encrypts it via RSA. Message is sent to server Alice retrieves her message, ...


0

Make an HTML escape function: function htmlEscape(str) { return String(str) .replace(/&/g, '&amp;') .replace(/"/g, '&quot;') .replace(/'/g, '&#39;') .replace(/</g, '&lt;') .replace(/>/g, '&gt;'); } (taken from the best answer to this question). Then change your ...


0

htmlspecialchars() is perfectly adequate for filtering user input that is displayed in html forms.


0

This is more a browser vulnerability than a website vulnerability in Internet Explorer from 2010: Checkmarx Research Labs has identified a new critical vulnerability in Internet Explorer (other browsers are probably exposed the same way) that would allow hackers to easily compromise web applications. This is a violation of the Same Origin Policy by ...


-2

you can disable any control of the editor by the attribute "controls" http://courses.coreservlets.com/Course-Materials/pdf/jsf/primefaces/users-guide/p-editor.pdf bold • italic • underline • strikethrough • subscript • superscript • font • size • style • color • highlight • bullets • numbering • alignleft • center • alignright • justify • undo • redo • ...


1

From OWASP Site Cross-Site History Manipulation (XSHM) is a SOP (Same Origin Policy) security breach. SOP is the most important security concept of modern browsers. SOP means that web pages from different origins by design cannot communicate with each other. Cross-Site History Manipulation breach is based on the fact that client-side browser ...


0

Remove 'requestDataValueProcessor' and 'editableValidator' beans from 'applicationContext-hdiv.xml' file, they are automatically created by tag. Have a look at this project configuration for a working example: https://github.com/hdiv/hdiv-spring-mvc-showcase


1

You should sanitize all output to prevent XSS. Use the htmlentities PHP function for this. Filtering or validation can be done on input, however the focus should always be on output sanitization. For example, on input you may want to validate that a phone number contains numbers and the following characters only ()- #. On output you should always ...


1

XSS is an output problem, not an input problem. Input validation is about making sure data is correct according to the domain. So for instance you want to check that a field expecting to take a year actually receives a number within the expected range. You may also want to make sure that only allowed characters are in use. And in many cases this will stop ...


1

It should work for making your application very secure, as no user input (besides the user editable $_FILE, $_SERVER) would be susceptible to XSS unless there was a glitch in your library. However, it may adversely affect your servers performance if many people are attempting to access your application. I would write a better function like this: public ...


0

Allowing arbitrary JavaScript, Flash and other active content (such as iframes etc...) from untrusted sources carries a security risk. JavaScript and other active content can be used for malicious purposes through the use of Cross-Site Scripting (XSS). Allowing JavaScript from untrusted sources has caused issues in the past (one of the most famous examples ...


0

If the user input is HTML, and you encode it before saving it, then when you display it, you should decode it. The reason the recommendation exists to encode before displaying is if the user input is expected to be text, it is recommended to encode for general display purposes (so that an ampersand actually displays as &) and also to prevent potentially ...


0

Try this: row 'PHONE', :phone_number do organization.phone_number.html_safe end


3

Makes much more sense to me not to let those sneaky bastards into the database in the first place. Actually - that is not true. The reason that XSS is only handled by blade is that XSS attacks are an output problem. There is no security risk if you store <script>alert('Hacking Sony in 3...2...')</script> in your database - it is just text - it ...


1

As far as I know, the "official" Laravel position is that XSS prevention best practice is to escape output. Thus, {{{ }}}. I usually roll my own with Input::all(), strip_tags(), and array_map().


3

expression() is the only way to dynamically specify html node attributes. It takes any valid JScript expression as an argument. So technically there is no way to execute javascript via style attribute on an html node (JScript !== javascript). The reason this functionality doesn't exist, (or has been deprecated) is because it creates a pretty big security ...


0

It's packaged by default as dependency gem in Rails4. You can find more details here: Ruby 2.1 with erubis Template Engine


0

Unfortunately, the other answers are wrong: Using strip_tags is not secure. The reason? A user could simply enter code like this to bypass your sanitization: <p onmouseover="alert('This could be evil XSS')">Test texts.</p> <a href="#fragment">and other text</a> Passing this through strip_tags allowing <p> tags does not ...


1

Some things I recommend you. Remove all unneeded privileges to the webapplication database user. If your web application doesn't needs the drop, it should not have that privilege (review all of them). I recommend you in the future to consider PostgreSQL instead of MySQL if you are looking for open source Database server as privileges are more finegrained. ...


2

Against SQL injection you should escape everything user input used in sql queries. Or use prepared statements/bind variables. Escaping: http://uk1.php.net/mysqli.real-escape-string.php, PDO: http://php.net/manual/en/ref.pdo-mysql.php Against XSS, you have to escape what you display to your client. But this depends on what and where you display. You have to ...


0

Is is safe to allow registered users to add javascripts on their subdomains? If done right yes. Search for JSONP, CSRF, XSS, CORS, and same origin policy. I'm clearly not going to explain all of this in an answer, it is far to much for this place here.



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