Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

See this config option: http://htmlpurifier.org/live/configdoc/plain.html#HTML.Attr.Name.UseCDATA The W3C specification DTD defines the name attribute to be CDATA, not ID, due to limitations of DTD. In certain documents, this relaxed behavior is desired, whether it is to specify duplicate names, or to specify names that would be illegal IDs (for example, ...


2

HTML-injection is an output-stage issue, caused by forgetting to encode text when injecting it into a context where characters are special. ESAPI offers encoders for various contexts, as discussed by @Zakaria. If you use these consistently, each in the correct context, you have fixed injection-related XSS issues. If you are using purely JSTL tags like ...


0

Cross Site Scripting (XSS) is a security issue which occurs when there is no mechanism of validating user input so the result will be an exploitable javascript code generally. 3 types of XSS are known : Reflexive XSS, DOM-based XSS and Persistant XSS. In your case and since you're using OWASP ESAPI, canonicalizing inputs is not enough, sure it's a good way ...


4

A simple way, you can just use the OWASP Enterprise Security API (Java Edition) : String safe = ESAPI.encoder().encodeForHTML( request.getParameter( "input" ) ); See those link: OWASP Enterprise Security API (Java Edition) Documentation OWASP Enterprise Security API (Java Edition) Code Example


0

ESAPI is no longer a flagship project for OWASP. There has been no releases since 2013, which means the project is stale. If all you need is output escaping, use the encoder project. That one is maintained. No single solution can be guaranteed to sanitize all XSS. You have to allow that a clever attacker might be able to exploit a bug in the HTML ...


0

All content coming from users should be escaped, whether from the URL or from the database. In this case, you'll just do URL encoding instead of HTML entities. It's possible your templating engine is already smart enough to do this for values going into HTML attributes.


0

I know you said you preferred native functions, but I have generally been able to find ways to beat most solutions. This library, however, definitely does the job. It is a little slow if you run a ton of executions (> 1000 per request would slow your page down). http://htmlpurifier.org/


-1

Like this: Check this answer, it's the one with the function below: XSS filtering function in PHP function xss_clean($data) { /* * Function to clean a string to prevent XSS attack. */ // Fix &entity\n; $data = str_replace(array('&','<','>'), ...


1

I'd strongly suggest not going down the regex route (You can't parse HTML with Regex), and consider something like HTMLAgilityPack. This would allow you to remove all script elements, as well as remove all event handlers from elements regardless of how they're set up. The alternative is to escape all HTML input, and then manually parse the particular tags ...


0

Well, this is where it helps to know something about the implementation of LINQ-to-SQL you are using. I would imagine that every implementation would by default escape arguments to the LINQ extension methods, but never hurts to double-check. In general, you want there to always be a middle-man sitting between the user interface and the service layer. You ...


0

We should be overriding the Image object that is being created and not the native Image object itself which is what you are doing. It should look like this: (function () { var NativeImage; var createImage = function () { var image = new NativeImage(arguments); Object.defineProperty(image, 'src', { set: function ...


0

MSDN article "How To: Prevent Cross-Site Scripting in ASP.NET" goes into a lot of details on it. Partial content below. Summary of Steps To prevent cross-site scripting, perform the following steps: Step 1. Check that ASP.NET request validation is enabled. Step 2. Review ASP.NET code that generates HTML output. Step 3. Determine whether HTML output ...


0

From your question it seems to me that you should wrap the Response from the server, not the incoming Request. See this : HttpServletResponseWrapper It should be a matter of changing the class your wrapper extends, i.e. from public final class RequestWrapper extends HttpServletRequestWrapper to public final class ResponseWrapper extends ...


0

Yes, i think if you are looking for encoding api to stop XSS then OWASP Java Encoder is best option. For context based encoding to stooping xss, i would prefer java encoder over ESAPI


0

If you want the filter to run automatically every time it encounters POST or COOKIE data you can enable it by opening your application/config/config.php file and setting this: $config['global_xss_filtering'] = TRUE; You can enable csrf protection by opening your application/config/config.php file and setting this: $config['csrf_protection'] = TRUE; for ...


0

You can show an error message under the input marking some chars by wrapping them in spans. Doing this on a input field is not possible as far as I know. <div class="error">Invalid chars in: <span class="mark">#</span>test</div>. As already mentioned you should not rely on javascript validation only. It mainly helps to prevent ...


0

If your Serlvet 3.0 web server, like tomcat 7.0+, you can use below in web.xml as: <session-config> <cookie-config> <http-only>true</http-only> <secure>true</secure> </cookie-config> </session-config> As mentioned in docs: HttpOnly: Specifies whether any session tracking ...


0

Here is the action script (scroll down the page): http://domstorm.skepticfx.com/modules?id=529bbe6e125fac0000000003 You can see the result of the js "exploit" variable injection in DOM. (Un)fortunately jQuery, and the old versions, is such-alike.


0

As I wasn't really satisfied with the other answer's citations on the reasoning behind this behaviour I escalated this 'issue' to the WHATWG mailing list, as it does present some possible (albeit small) security loopholes. To quote Ian Hickson (chief editor of the HTML5 standard at W3C) verbatim: It's not great, but it is intentional. Within <svg> ...


0

It looks like the attacker was searching got a remote-file-inclusion attack of some kind, but this doesn't look like a very sophisticated attack, probably some automated script that tries to inject everything he can anywhere he can. But anyway I'm wondering - why are you trying so bad to prevent an error with a bad input? Preventing this specific error ...


4

The use of character references within script tags is explicitly disallowed by the HTML parser according to the HTML 5 specification. HTML5 has a separate script parsing mode as one of a number of tokenisation modes that vary with context. Script parsing does not allow character references, some of the other parsing modes do. SVG is based on XML where the ...


4

The window.onerror itself is a function. You can say it as a function name or better, function reference. And alert is also a name of the function, which can be called as funtion reference. So, they are mapping the onerror with alert, i.e., when the onerror event takes place, there will be an alert. The window.onerror being an event handler, and alert is ...


2

Here are two scenarios. Top-level XSS In the case that an attacker can manipulate a top-level URL into responding to a malformed request like HTTP/1.1 400 Bad Request ... <script>alert(document.cookie)</script> then setting Content-Type: text/plain mitigates an XSS attack (see detailed answer below). AJAX XSS If, however, the attacker can ...


0

Drakes answer above troubled me, so I created a simple proof of concept to see if I was correct. I am. Even with Content-Type: text/plain;charset=UTF-8 an application can be compromised with a simple XSS attack. The reason, as I tried to explain below the first time, is that it is the data handling that is important, and the eventual destination and ...


0

Do not attempt to prevent XSS attacks during input. Always escape on output. See also: Stored XSS in Wordpress 4.2 caused by MySQL column truncation. Filtering on output would have prevented these conditions. Instead, what you want to do is just use prepared statements and store the data naked. (You should still validate the data of course! Make sure ...


0

Why are you using a function named Anti_Sql_Injection() to prevent XSS attacks? You should be using Prepared Statements to stop SQL injection and an appropriate, separate strategy for stopping XSS attacks. Don't try to kill two birds with one stone. You end up altering data. XSS prevention made easy Are you using a framework that offers context-sensitive ...


0

XSS isn't an infection, it's a type of security vulnerability. You can learn more about preventing XSS vulnerabilities here. How to detect theme can be infected with XSS attack? or already infected? There isn't an easy answer to this question. To determine if a theme is vulnerable to XSS attacks, you need to audit every source file and check ...


0

Also do not forget to set URI.DisableExternalResources: false if you've set it to true before.


-1

Use HTML (which is rendered as div) and assign it as SafeHtmlString.


1

You have multiple possibilities, you can encode the string data you received (https://github.com/mathiasbynens/he) before saving them into the DB, in this manner you don't need to do almost nothing displaying them, because they will displayed as a string like this &lt;script type=&quot;..&quot;&gt;...&lt;/script&gt; for example. But ...


0

I found the solution as using the AntiXSS library for Razor encoderType. This answer describes it well. Special characters in html output The default Razor encoder encodes accented chars whereas the AntiXSS library does not encode them. So, accented chars are rendered as they are.


1

The only mandatory character to entity encoding is for <, which starts the opening and closing tags of HTML elements, the & character, which otherwise starts an HTML entity, and (within attributes enclosed in double quotes) " to prevent terminating an attribute prematurely. It is also a good idea to use the entity for > to prevent confusing ...


0

Instead of relying only on <c:out />, an antixss library should also be used, which will not only encode but also sanitize malicious script in input. One of the best library available is OWASP Antisamy, it's highly flexible and can be configured(using xml policy files) as per requirement. For e.g. if an application supports only text input then most ...


0

Quoting Anton Kovalyov's (former engineer at Disqus) answer to the same question on a different site that was really helpful to me: Disqus is a third-party JavaScript application that runs in your browser and injects itself on publishers' websites. These publishers need to install a small snippet of JavaScript code that makes the first request to our ...


0

If u want to display customized message for that exception u should configure Spring to use message.properties file and specify 'typeMismatch.className.propertyName' message or global message for typeMismatch. For example(Spring 3.2): In servlet-config.xml <bean id="messageSource" ...


2

You need to have a BindingResult argument right after the command argument (with @Value annotation) in your controller. Then you can inspect the bindingResult and decide what to do with the stuff that could`t be bind. When you have that BindingResult argument then the controller method gets invoked, even with an binding error, and you have to handle the ...


0

I found an answer here: https://www.owasp.org/index.php?title=JavaScript_Closure_Within_Eval&setlang=es In that example, the OWASP ESAPI library is used for encoding instead of the OWASP Java Encoder Project, but that doesn't matter.


0

It depends on how you have escaped that "data". Your data is located in a "-delimited JavaScript string inside a '-delimited JavaScript string possibly inside an HTML <script> element (if not being loaded as an external script). So you would need to call up to three different escape functions on your data to make it secure. That said, there are ...


0

There is an overload of setInterval that accepts a string of code instead of a function, which is basically exec on an interval. I believe that is what the OWASP cheat sheet is referring to, you can put untrusted strings in that overload. You are using the function overload, which is not the one OWASP is calling out.


1

You'd have to use: $("output_area").text(data) If you want to inject HTML code, then you'd need to extract from the data and adding them as texts to HTML code that you yourself construct ($('<p/>').text(extractedParagraph), etc).


0

I found an iFrame as well in my drupal 7 website. It was loaded into the site by enabling the module of sharaholic.


0

I did a quick POC, and at the outset it does look a bug in firefox. For simplicity here's the code I used and tried to open this webpage in IE, Chrome, Safari, and Firefox. With IE, Chrome, and Safari, the background gets changed to #FFCCCC, however in Firefox there is an error in the console. "Stylesheet could not be loaded." Expected color but found ...


0

I'm assuming this is Rule #5: URL Escape Before Inserting Untrusted Data into HTML URL Parameter Values (Not rule #35.) This is referring to individual parameter values: <a href="http://www.example.com?test=...ESCAPE UNTRUSTED DATA BEFORE PUTTING HERE...">link</a > URL and HTML encoding protect against different things. URL ...


0

Could somebody provide an example of why I should HTML encode and then JS encode, and not double encode in HTML when using the .innerHTML method? Sure. Assuming the "user provided data" is populated in your JavaScript by the server, then you will have to JS encode to get it there. This following is pseudo code on the server-side end, but in ...


0

Yes, they are extremely connected. I was researching the matter when I come across this unanswered thread. Basically, it should not be a problem for small, simple and public content. But, as integration through CORS increases in more interactive and complex applications, XSS can be used on a vulnerable system to attack our system. For example a worm ...


1

A simple way to make sure the contents of your element is properly encoded (and will not be parsed as HTML) is to use textContent instead of innerHTML: element.textContent = "User provided variable with <img src=a>"; Another option is to use innerHTML only after you have encoded (preferably on the server if you get the chance) the values you intend ...


0

You can try Netsparker (https://www.netsparker.com/) tool or Acunetix Web Vulnerability Scanner trial version (https://www.acunetix.com/vulnerability-scanner/download/) is work fine. Using that both i found many issues.



Top 50 recent answers are included