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1

Use REReplace or REReplaceNoCase functions to remove unwanted characters (specified as regular expression) from a string: #REReplace(";,&,<,>,`,',!,@,$,%,(,),=,+,{,},[,],\", "[;&<>`'!@$%()=+{}[\]\\,]*", "", "ALL")# ReplaceList function is useful in case if you need to replace certain values from one list with corresponding values from ...


2

You can get rid of the empty list elements like this: NewList = ArrayToList(ListToArray(OldList));


0

There are many reliable Markdown Parsers available. Why reinvent the wheel? For example: This


0

The former is done by updating your hosts file on your local machine to point old.com to something else, this overrides what the internet DNS states. The latter very much depends on how your application is build and there is not enough info here.


0

You can disable IE's XSS filter on a per-page basis by sending the following HTTP header. X-XSS-Protection: 0


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The only way around it without modifying browser settings is to set up a proxy script on your server that will forward data to http://validator.w3.org/check using libcurl and print the result. This way all cross-site traffic is moved to the server side where there are no such restrictions. There are other options, such as setting up your own local copy of ...


0

This is due to Cross-site Scripting (XSS) Filter enabled in the browser. This can be solved by disbaling xss filter. Check here on how to disable it


0

I understand what you are trying to do. Just write this in your address bar. javascript:alert(1) You will see a java-script alert. When you type a url, browser understands (http implied) it as a http request and anything in the query string for example in your case "?alert(1);" goes in as Request GET parameters. So your request actually goes to your local ...


0

I think Fortify has found that event.getCurrencyCode() could be any length string and may contain a cross-site scripting attack that might send an unsuspecting user to a malicious site or cause the browser to load JavaScript that does bad things to the user. You might be able to tell this by looking at the details tab of the finding in Fortify's Audit ...


0

X-XSS-Protection: 1 : Force XSS protection (useful if XSS protection was disabled by the user) X-XSS-Protection: 0 : Disable XSS protection The token mode=block will prevent browser (IE8+ and Webkit browsers) to render pages (instead of sanitizing) if a potential XSS reflection (= non-persistent) attack is detected. /!\ Warning, mode=block creates a ...


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if you still have problem, look at: https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/topics/templates/#automatic-html-escaping Django should automaticly escape html code, unless you tell not to do it.


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I just saw this on a site that I manage. The script is encoded but it's fairly easy to find out what it expands to: $ curl https://d1ui18tz1fx59z.cloudfront.net/js/all/pd2.js?v=18 > raw.js $ sed -i 's/eval/console.log/' raw.js $ node raw.js [lots of output] I then fed the output into http://jsbeautifier.org/ and got ...


0

The Django template that renders the original page is also used to render content for infinite scroll (partial view). Therefore you are safe. If all you are doing is rendering content that you have control of and already trust for your initial page load, then there will be nothing malicious in the page source to be rendered. In this case as you are ...


-1

Update Use this line before passing the HTML into the jQuery it will remove any scripts (including onmouseover etc.) that are included in the HTML: var cleansed = str.replace(/<script\b[^<]*(?:(?!<\/script>)<[^<]*)*<\/script>/gmi, ""); cleansed = cleansed.replace(/\bon\w+\s*=[\s\S]*?>/gmi, ">"); I still say that the ...


0

There's no automatic attribute available for this, you'll have to do some work yourself. I'm not sure if you already know about the Microsoft Web Protection Library. It includes the AntiXSS component (NuGet link), which seems ideal for what you want. This OWASP article contains a lot of useful information and Haacked has a tutorial on how to use it. ...


0

To prevent reflected and stored XSS you need to escape/encode part of the response from the server (output fields). Some encoding inside the browser page itself could be useful only against DOM XSS but this is a more rare scenario.


0

After googling I end-up at owasp site. It contains nice checklist for REST security & assessment. Links: REST Security and REST Assessment


1

Interesting how this is being implemented years later by google and them removing the URL all together in order to prevent XSS attacks and other malicious acitivites


1

PHP's mysqli_real_escape_string is an option but I prefer solutions like preg_replace Stop there. It's clear by this statement, your question, and the question tags that you don't understand what escaping is for. Rather than answering your question directly, let me try to explain it. mysqli_real_escape_string() escapes strings for SQL. All this ...


1

The correct way to handle this is to set the text. $('#abc').text('What <ever> you & want;'); Then, no escaping is necessary.


0

I met same thing in past, but that situation only appear on tag. I mean, when using on template, it automatically escape HTML (for preventing XSS), but in tags it does not. And I must declare ${someVar?.escape().raw()} in all tags.


0

The tag has an attribute escape. This will escape any sensitive HTML in the output of the tag. This is true by default and alone will not prevent XSS injection attacks. To do this you need to implement your ServletFilter that filters XSS injection attempts from all request parameters. The following project can be used to clean your request parameters, ...


0

AntiSamy lib is embedded into cq-xssprotection bundle and used by it's services, in 5.5 version as well as in 5.6. Decompilation of this jar proved that they use cq/xssprotection/config configuration from /libs or /apps if it's overlay. my cq instance has already contained cq-xssprotection bundle. If you don't have it out of the box you can try download it ...


0

What you put in your query doesn't have to be the same as what you display on the web page, right? You can save the original $_GET in a session for example and for displaying it on the webpage you use htmlentities($_SESSION['search_query']) i.e. If you would reload the query all the time and use htmlentities($_GET); then you can expect after the second ...


2

wHash = escape(…) is executed before $(wHash), which would create the image element from <img …>. But as escape is mangling the value before it is evaluated by $, the escape function redefinition would only happen after it has already been called.


1

The XSS protection mechanism offered by CQ is already based on the AntiSamy Project. You only need to provide your custom antisamy configuration, in case the default configuration doesn't suit your needs. The default antisamy configuration is present at /libs/cq/xssprotection/config.xml, which can be overlaid with your custom config within /apps. You can ...


0

The problem here is that Fortify doesn't have a rule for your cleanXSS method. What you will have to do is to write a custom rule, specifically a "data flow cleanse rule". This will let fortify know that any data that enters and then returned from this method will be safe from XSS. However after looking at you XSS filter, I have to inform you that it's ...


2

Do not decode, send the string with entities directly to the HTML output. The HTML entities will be shown correctly by the user's browser. When you output from PHP echo "Hello kitty!&lt;script&gt;steal_her_password();&lt;/script&gt;"; then the user will correctly see Hello kitty!<script>steal_her_password();</script> but ...


0

No, functions like htmlspecialchars and htmlentities do not protect against all cases of Cross-Site Scripting. Cases in which these function won’t help are: The exploit data does not reach the server (DOM-based XSS). The exploit data is not interpreted in an HTML context only and the special characters encoded by these functions are either not required or ...


0

read up what a cross site scripting vulnerability can do to your application. The short answer is to have input validation or output encoding so you do not treat malicious input as actual script. The long answer can be found at: https://www.owasp.org/index.php/Top_10_2013-A3-Cross-Site_Scripting_(XSS) The solution cheat sheet is here: ...


1

It works exactly fine. I doubt that honestly.. your negated character class matches any character except: &, if you want to prevent the other characters you specified, add them to your class as well. [^&"<>] # any character except: '&', '"', '<', '>' If you want to accept the & then just remove it from the class. ...


1

Negated Character Class [^&] is a negated character class that matches one character that is not & (the ^ is what makes is negative) To only a string that contains no <,> or ", add them to a negated character class and use anchors: The ^ anchor asserts that we are at the beginning of the string The $ anchor asserts that we are at the end of ...


1

please use $this->input->post('name',false); second parameter accepts whether to perform xss_clean or not


1

Yes. As described by @YOU an attacker could craft a callback parameter that evaluates to malicious javascript, or worse, malicious Flash. Validating that the callback isn't a reserved word and is alpha-numeric as described by @Brett-Wejrowski is a good start. Google, Facebook and Github are mitigating the Rosetta Flash vulnerability by pre-pending an ...


0

Which version of CQ5 are you using? If it is CQ 5.4, xssAPI is not available in it when you include global.jsp. Instead you could use the XSSProtectionService.class to protect from XSS. The XSSProtectionService can be obtained from sling.getService() and the protectFromXSS() can be used. final XSSProtectionService xss = ...


0

It despends on how you're using this address. If you're using it to determine whether you have access to an application within a certain range of addresses, for example, it is an issue. Address resolution protocol (ARP) poisining is one of the most basic tools in an attackers toolkit. If you're only using this to log a machine name for convenience ...


0

If your encoding (lets assume that it's Unicode by default) supports Farsi it's safe to use Farsi, without any additional effort, in ASP.NET MVC almost always. First of all, escape-on-input is just wrong - you've taken some input and applied some transformation that is totally irrelevant to that data. It's generally wrong to encode your data immediately ...


1

I think I messed up! Razor view encodes the values unless you use @Html.Raw right? Well, I encoded the string and it encoded it again. So in the end it just got encoded twice and hence, the weird looking chars (Unicode values)!


0

There are currently no known vulnerabilities, and Phabricator participates in HackerOne: https://hackerone.com/phabricator


1

You need to make sure the user-inputed cookie value is equal to one of your hard-coded values, so just make sure it's in your array: $required = array('classic', 'holiday', 'normal'); $style_name = 'normal'; if(!empty($_COOKIE['style']) && in_array( $_COOKIE['style'] , $required )) $style_name = $_COOKIE['style']; Now the $style_name variable ...



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