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41

When you don't use tmux or screen, you only need to configure your terminal emulators to advertise themselves as "capable of displaying 256 colors" by setting their TERM to xterm-256color or any comparable value that works with your terminals and platforms. How you do it will depend on the terminal emulator and is outside of the scope of your question and ...


37

Rather than using obfuscated escape sequences, use the tput facility instead. Here is an excerpt from my ~/.bashrc that I use for my PS1 prompt: BLACK=$(tput setaf 0) RED=$(tput setaf 1) GREEN=$(tput setaf 2) YELLOW=$(tput setaf 3) LIME_YELLOW=$(tput setaf 190) POWDER_BLUE=$(tput setaf 153) BLUE=$(tput setaf 4) MAGENTA=$(tput setaf 5) CYAN=$(tput setaf 6) ...


32

You can use GNU screen's copy and paste commands. Quick tutorial: Open screen: screen (or screen myprog my args here) Run your program, producing output you want copied Enter copy mode: ^A [ Move your cursor to the start point Hit enter Move your cursor to the end point Hit enter Paste: ^A ] Screen is much more powerful than that (I use it to tab ...


26

You can set the screen / xterm title using the following lines: #!/bin/bash mytitle="Some title" echo -e '\033k'$mytitle'\033\\' [UPDATE] - by request I'm also including the solution proposed by @Espo below: Depending on your xterm version or your linux distribution the line above may or may not work and you can try the xterm-defaults: #!/bin/bash ...


21

In the file .screenrc in your home directory, add the line: altscreen on That should fix it. According to the man page for screen, it turns on "alternate screen" support, "just like in xterm." I tested it out, and it does what you're looking for.


21

Recent “unreleased” versions of tmux do automatically recognize those xterm-style key sequences once you have your terminal sending them (no need to change your terminfo entry). The next release version (1.8?) should also have this support. With an appropriate build of tmux1, all you have to do is bind the keys in your tmux configuration: bind-key C-Tab ...


20

xterm-256color describes Xterm with support for 256 colors enabled. xterm-color describes an older branch of Xterm that supports sixteen colors. xterm-color is not recommended, since it describes a variant of Xterm that’s less functional and that you’re not likely to be using. Usually you’ll want to use xterm, xterm-16color or xterm-256color. In particular, ...


18

Terminals were hardware devices that consisted of a keyboard and an output device (initially a line printer, later a CRT monitor). A large computer could have several remote terminals connected to it. Each terminal would have a protocol for communicating efficiently with the computer, for CRT-based terminals this includes having special "control sequences" ...


18

here is how I fixed it: Make sure your are in your home directory, so "cd" and "pwd" to see that you are there Create the .Xresources file, just like "touch .Xresources" Edit it with your favourite editor ;) Here is my set up, it is actually very useful, it includes a side bar, and removes the top bar: Xft*antialias: true Xft*autohint: ...


16

Here's a script snippet using the colorized output of ls as an example (on Mac OS X 10.6). # no colored ls output if stdout is a pipe (and not a tty) ls -G / ls -G / | cat script -q /dev/null ls -G / | tr -d '\r' | cat # write output of script command to a variable var="$(script -q /dev/null ls -G / | tr -d '\r' | cat)" echo "$var"


15

There are two well-supported ways to change the background color of an xterm (remember xterm != Terminal). A. Set the color when you create the xterm: E.g., % xterm -bg yellow & OR B. Edit .Xdefaults to include a color specification, such as the following: XTerm*background:yellow % vi ~/.Xdefaults (pick your favorite editor) This can also be ...


14

isatty(int fd) will check whether the fd refers to a terminal or something else. It's part of unistd.h in the GNU C library. Man page: http://linux.die.net/man/3/isatty As an aside: if you want to read from a program using another program, but you want to fool isatty into thinking that your program is a human, there is a way to do that. You can use a ...


13

Simple, print the bell character. In Python: print('\a') From bash shell: echo $'\a' Note that on some terminals, the bell can be disabled. In others, the bell can be replaced with a visual bell in the shape of a flashing screen background.


11

Here's an adaptation of the 256colors2.pl script to ruby, with some help from this guide. It defines a print_color(text, foreground, background) method that should be easily applicable to your projects. It prints the string in colour, and then resets the colour to the terminal default. Should be easy enough to skip the reset if you'd prefer that. def ...


11

The color brightwhite looks ok on my Emacs (which is running under a terminal, not X). On RHEL5 I have my TERM environment variable set to xterm-256color. If it's working correctly, you should be able to run these scripts and see 256-color output. Under Emacs, you should see a reasonably smooth color ramp (no obviously duplicated colors) when you do M-x ...


11

From http://www.faqs.org/docs/Linux-mini/Xterm-Title.html#s3 xterm escape sequences Window and icon titles may be changed in a running xterm by using XTerm escape sequences. The following sequences are useful in this respect: ESC]0;stringBEL -- Set icon name and window title to string ESC]1;stringBEL -- Set icon name to string ...


9

I find XSel is useful in similar situations. It's a tool that manipulates the X selection. For example, this will store the output of your command to the clipboard: grep error error.log | xsel -bi


9

This is probably because certain settings in Emacs are specific to the terminal, and manipulating such settings in your init file will only affect the terminal which is active at the time the init file was evaluated. The following Q+A deals with much the same issue, and goes into the details: Run command on new frame with daemon/client in Emacs For your ...


9

From the man page: -X Enables X11 forwarding. This can also be specified on a per-host basis in a configuration file. X11 forwarding should be enabled with caution. Users with the ability to bypass file permissions on the remote host (for the user's X authorization database) can access the local X11 display ...


9

It seems xterm has added support for the vertical bar or I-beam cursor. You can change the cursor by inserting one of the following lines in your ~/.bashrc file (if you use bash): echo -e -n "\x1b[\x30 q" # changes to blinking block echo -e -n "\x1b[\x31 q" # changes to blinking block also echo -e -n "\x1b[\x32 q" # changes to steady block echo -e -n ...


9

this will reload the .Xresources. Hope this helps xrdb ~/.Xresources from arch wiki


8

set_screen_title () { echo -ne "\ek$1\e\\" }


8

Have you issued a :set mouse=a or similar? Vim can accept mouse input through the terminal, but it needs to be explicitly enabled. Both PuTTY and xTerm support it. :help mouse for more details.


8

This gem should handle what you need: Rainbow


7

OK, after doing more research and getting help from one of my coworkers, I have found a solution to my problem. What has happened is that, although startx exists, it now starts the X server in fullscreen mode by default instead of multiwindow mode. Looking back, I probably could have copied /etc/X11/xinit/xinitrc to ~/.xinitrc and customized it. However, ...


7

Ok, so your problem here is due to mixing old-school C library calls (getc, printf %c) and UTF-8. Your code is correctly reading the three bytes which make up '€' - 226, 130 and 172 as decimal - but these values individually are not valid UTF-8 encoded glyphs. If you look at the UTF-8 encoding, Integer values 0..127 are the encodings for the original ...


7

It's a cheat. Note that this feature works only in "supported terminals" -- and by that it meant xterm, and rendering directly on the xterm window via xv. Or not! Just checked the sources, the file that interests us is here. It's still a hack -- via X11 and GTK!


7

This is a C Code to demonstrate how to detect if standard output is redirected: int main(int argc, char **argv){ if (!isatty(fileno(stdout))){ fprintf(stdout, "argv, argc, someone is redirecting me elsewhere...\n"); return 1; } /* rest of C code here... */ } That is how git knows whether the output is going to the terminal or to a ...


7

less -X Use the -X option from the less man page described below: -X or --no-init Disables sending the termcap initialization and deinitialization strings to the terminal. This is sometimes desirable if the deinitialization string does something unnecessary, like clearing the screen.


7

Di you try xrdb .Xdefaults before (re-)launching xterm?



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