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Change integral to imIntegral 0 displacement = feedback (-) (velocity >>> imIntegral 0) (gain $ k / m) 0 velocity = feedback (-) (imIntegral 0) (gain $ c / m) 0 From spring.hs: Using Simulink: Something funny is happening in the integral function, changing to imIntegral 0 gives the same curve as in matlab. My guess is that ...


3

I'm not really familiar with Yampa/Animas, but it seems like the problem is essentially that you have a recursion with no base case; you've described the evolution of the system, but not how it starts out. How about: aBoid = bBoid >>> boid (vector2 600 60) >>> iPre (vector2 0 0) bBoid = aBoid >>> boid (vector2 3 4) so that ...


3

This is a theoretical answer. Look to Roman Cheplyaka's answer to this question, which deals more with the practical details of what you're trying to achieve. The reason n is out of scope is that for it to be in scope to use there, you would have the equivalent of bind or >>= from monads. It's the use of the results of a previous computation as a ...


2

noiseR is a signal function; it produces a stream of random numbers, not just one random number (for that, you'd just use randomR from System.Random). On the other hand, the first argument of accumHold is just one, initial, value. So this is not just some limitation — it actually prevents you from committing a type error. If I understand correctly what ...


2

So with a little help from ehird i came up with something that works. The code is as follows(here using 3 boids instead of 2): sim :: SF a [Position2] sim = loopPre [zeroVector, zeroVector, zeroVector] ( arr snd >>> par route [boid (vector2 10 10), boid (vector2 100 400), boid (vector2 500 500)] >>> arr dup) Here the route ...


2

You're asking to have an arrow that's output by an arrow to be used as an arrow. That's what app from ArrowApply is for. If you want to use that in some looped construct like your diagram, you might need ArrowLoop, but actually the do notation allows you to be fairly flexible with all this stuff anyway. There's quite a lengthy explanation of app in this ...


2

All of the switch functions are ways to change a signal function to behave like another signal function. I personally find the Yampa diagrams to be somewhat difficult to parse, but the type signatures of the various switches give good indication for how to understand them. Once you understand the type signatures, the diagrams become much clearer. switch ...


1

I still think it's a case of ArrowLoop! You have in :: Arr () A sf :: Arr (A -> B, A) B one :: Arr B (A -> B) two :: Arr B C sf is just arr (uncurry ($)). Then you have sf >>> (one &&& two) :: Arr (A -> B, A) (A -> B, C) and you can use loop (or rather loop with arr swap judiciously placed) to get an Arr A C. Will that ...


1

After quite a while now, I have found I have been thinking entirely the wrong way. Here would be an extension of the above for testing for pressing of the "ESC" button: simple :: Reaction simple = proc ev -> do r <- integral -< 50 displayAction <- arr (uncurry tag) <<< first redisplay -< (ev, actionIO . display $ r) ...


1

I would think the reason that reactimate does not calculate the time delta itself is that this would hard code one specific notion of time. Imagine you want to simulate portfolio risk over a ten year period or something like this, and your time delta resolution should be one day. This being said, I agree the Ioref thing looks kind of hacky, though I used the ...


1

With the little hint from @martingw, I was able to cook up this, which is quite what I was looking for: star :: (Float, Float) -> SF (Float, Float) (Float, Float) star p0 = proc (a, vel) -> do let (vx,vy) = vel *^ (cos a, sin a) p <- clampS ^<< (p0 ^+^) ^<< integral -< (-vx,vy) returnA -< p clampS (x, y) = (x `fMod` ...


1

The obvious answer is to use a switch: gravity = dir 1 dir x = switch (constant x &&& keyUp SDLK_SPACE) (const (dir (-x))) This is certainly also possible without a switch by mapping over the event values, but the switch seems to be the natural solution. You can also use Netwire, which makes this a lot simpler: hold (iterateW negate 1 . ...


1

I don't know HOOD but Debug.Trace is easy: > import Debug.Trace > mover position0 = proc acceleration -> do > > velocity <- integral -< acceleration > > position <- trace ("vel:" ++ show velocity ++ "\n") $ > > > > > > > > > > > (position0 .+^) ^<< integral -< velocity > > ...


1

What you probably want to do is make mover more flexible, to support adding out-of-band debug information (the value of velocity) to be rendered. I don't think HOOD is relevant for your problem, since you already have the FRP framework for handling continuously changing values. Just arrange for velocity to be output. Something like: mover :: Position2 ...



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