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72

My implementation: Question #1 class App_Model_Acl extends Zend_Acl { const ROLE_GUEST = 'guest'; const ROLE_USER = 'user'; const ROLE_PUBLISHER = 'publisher'; const ROLE_EDITOR = 'editor'; const ROLE_ADMIN = 'admin'; const ROLE_GOD = 'god'; protected static $_instance; /* ...


27

I can paste you my ACL. It consists of three elements: acl.ini, ACL controller plugin (My_Controller_Plugin_Acl) and My_Acl class, and USER table. However it does not deal with modules, but with controllers and actions. Nevertheless it may give you some general idea about ACL. My use of ACL is based on the one in a book called "Zend Framework in Action". ...


15

Joey, good documentation on this can be hard to find, but it exists. What you need to do, in your application's bootstrap is two things: Initialise your ACL's Link them to your navigation object In my bootstraps, I use the functions similar to the following to do this. Here's examples of the key aspects: Generating the ACL's: protected function ...


13

You can use getRoles() - Returns an array of registered roles. and then check each of these with inheritsRole() - Returns true if and only if $role inherits from $inherit See the API docs Zend_Acl at http://framework.zend.com/apidoc/core/Zend_Acl/Zend_Acl.html Example $parents = array(); foreach ($acl->getRoles() as $inherit) { if ...


12

jalpesh and Hasina are both correct with their short answers. Jalpesh's example would be a shorthand call to the action helper redirector(), which defaults to the gotoSimple() method of redirection, except he seems to have the parameters backwards. //corrected $this->_helper->redirector($action, $controller); would be more verbosely called as: ...


10

That's exactly how it works and I think you're thinking about it in an accurate way. You can add your resources and then add privileges to allow certain user roles to access them. For example, in my CMS, I have "developers", "admins", and "users". In the code below I add general access and then remove some actions and specific methods from certain user's ...


9

The approach I usually take is to create a class that extends Zend_Acl, and extend the isAllowed() function so it can take my user object as a parameter instead. It then loops through that user's roles performing the check for each one. E.g.: public function isAllowed($roleOrUser = null, $resource = null, $privilege = null) { if ($roleOrUser instanceof ...


8

please try this to redirect from one controller to another. $this->_redirect('/module/controller/action/');


7

Here you go: You could use the combination of Zend_Auth and Zend_Acl. To extend the other answers I give a short example of how you can manage authentication using zend framework: First you need to setup a plugin to predispatch all requests and check if the client is allowed to access certain data. This plugin might look like this one: class ...


6

First solution: Avoid those exceptions, e.g. if (!$acl->has($your_resource)) { // .. handle it the way you need } Second one Handle those exceptions in ErrorController, i.e.: if ($errors->exception instanceof Zend_Acl_Exception) { // send needed headers... // prepare log message... // render info: resource_not_found.phtml ...


5

don't need to specify every denied role. at first you should define all of role as denied. after that, set allowable access resource for every role. so every role that you haven't declare as allowed for resource will be automatically denied. something like this : $acl = new Zend_Acl(); $acl->deny(); $acl->addResource($resource); ...


5

// in controller $this->view->allow_delete_post = $acl->isAllowed($role, 'delete_post'); . // in template <? if ($this->allow_delete_post): ?>[button html]<? endif; ?> Would that not do it?


5

I confess to being no Zend_Acl expert, but to me, the essence of using Zend_Acl is identifying the roles, the resources, and the privileges. The roles are usually pretty obvious. And once you have clearly identified the resources, the privileges often become apparent. So to me, the key is identifying the resource. In your circumstance, it sounds like you ...


5

Well I think this structure is really good , to get this working you had to do 2 steps 1-Setup all the databases and requirements 2- create an ACL plugin that determine the user's role and his permissions some example with doctrine support : Developing a Doctrine-backed ACL helper TDD-style, part 1 Developing a Doctrine-backed ACL helper TDD-style, ...


4

Just because something exists in ZF, doesnt mean you have to use it any cost. You dont get bonus points for it. If you feel Zend_Acl to be overkill for your usecase, use your simpler approach. That's perfectly acceptable. Actually, in one of my apps, I am using an ActionHelper to check on a user's role. The helper has a single method requireRole() that ...


4

In that case, you want to create your own 'Auth' class to extend and remove the 'singleton' design pattern that exists in Zend_Auth This is by no means complete, but you can create an instance and pass it a 'namespace'. The rest of Zend_Auth's public methods should be fine for you. <?php class My_Auth extends Zend_Auth { public function ...


4

You are using it in the view, so for me ViewHelper is correct place for that - I've done it once that way: class Zend_View_Helper_HasAccess extends Zend_View_Helper_Abstract { private $_acl; public function hasAccess($role, $controller, $action) { if (!$this->_acl) { $this->_acl = ...


4

I have a simple example that might fits your needs class Dagho_Acl_Main extends Zend_Acl { public function __construct() { $anonymous = new Zend_Acl_Role("anonymous"); $customer = new Zend_Acl_Role("customer"); $admin = new Zend_Acl_Role("admin"); $anonymousResource = new Zend_Acl_Resource("acl"); ...


4

Generally speaking, putting this kind of stuff - not just ACL - in its own class provides several benefits, including: Testability: You now have a single component to which you can apply unit testing. Extensibility: You can extend it and modify it, if necessary Portability: Use it in another project simply by dropping it in. In this particular case, ...


4

I think that you should be able to get current navigation page as follows: /** * Load Navigation view helper */ $oViewRenderer = Zend_Controller_Action_HelperBroker::getStaticHelper('ViewRenderer'); $oNavigation = $oViewRenderer->view->navigation(); /*@var $active array */ $active = ...


4

if (!$this->_acl->isAllowed($role, $resource, $privilege)) { $request->setModuleName('default'); $request->setControllerName('login'); $request->setActionName('login'); $request->setDispatched(false); } Are you sure that you always have permission to access the login-controller regardless of role? Anyway, it ...


4

It totally depends on your needs. Rbac is Access Control managed by permissions on merely roles, where Acl is a solution where you will be managing both resources and roles. The Rbac of Zend Framework 2 has some complexities that are going to be simplified in ZF3. If you consider using Rbac I would suggest to check zfc-rbac from zf-commons which is built ...


3

You could check for the resource(action) to exist in the acl: if(!$this->_acl->has($resource) || $this->_acl->isAllowed($role, $resource, $action)) Else could simply deny by default. If you then check for a non-existing action the acl will return false by default. If you simply want to detect if a not-existing action is called from your ...


3

You can create custom assertions for Zend_Acl. These custom assertions can be passed to the regular allow() method as the fourth param, e.g. $acl->allow(null, null, null, new MyCustomAssertion()); The assertion can contain any code you want. It has to return a Boolean which will be considered for any ACL checks then, e.g. is this userid allowed access ...


3

Yes the Zend ACL in ZF can be used to determine owner rights and setup to allow content owner to edit their own posts etc. I am not sure if this place has specific examples for what you want, but you can checkout some Zend ACL Tutorials from zftutorials.com UPDATE Setting up the ACL can be done in many different ways depending on how your groups etc are ...


3

I am using a white-list approach. This means I have a denyAll as a start policy and a grant access to resources only after checking the permissions for the given role. I think is a safer practice. In same cases you could choose one over another depending on how most of your resources are. For example if most of your website is public start from allowAll and ...


3

The Problem you describe happens a lot with the using of global Variables and the OOP global Variable (the Singleton Pattern). There is a Article by the Author of PHPUnit that describes how you can avoid that by using Dependency Injection and what other possibilities you've got and since it's more verbose that i could be here i just suggest you read it :) ...


3

You are by no way limited to using the role system to denote groups in Zend_Acl. For example: In one application, I have my base user object, implement Zend_Acl_Role_Interface which, in this case returns a string that is specific for the user. For simplicity sake, let's just say something like user-1, where the numeric portion is the user's unique ID. ...


3

There are basically two philosophies in using ACL: deny all at startup and give access to resources only after checking black lists/white lists/ permission and all the check you want. allow all at startup and then deny access to the sensitive area, where you will allow access only after checks. I prefer to go with the first one usually. The second one is ...


3

Gordon's ACL is the way to go (and I upvoted it). I just wanted to pipe in and describe exactly what I do. I created both the sign in and sign out pages in my navigation config: <user_signin> <label>Sign in</label> <other_stuff></other_stuff> <resource>mvc:user_signin</resource> ...



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