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20

Not sure if this will help you, but try using: // to show both date and time, $date->get('YYYY-MM-dd HH:mm:ss'); // or, to show date only $date->get('YYYY-MM-dd')


13

$date1 = new Zend_Date('2011-11-14 10:45:00'); $date2 = new Zend_Date('2011-11-14 19:15:00'); if ($date1->compareDay($date2) === 0) { echo 'same day'; } Also see the chapter on Comparing Dates with Zend Date On a sidenote, I strongly encourage you to verify if you have the need for Zend_Date. Do not use it just because it is part of ZF. Most of ...


13

From the ZF issue tracker it seems this is a known issue: Recently a lot of ZF users are filing a bug that Zend_Date returns the wrong year, 2009 instead of 2008. This is however expected behaviour, and NOT A BUG! From the FAQ: When using own formats in your code you could come to a situation where you get for example 29.12.2009, but you expected to get ...


12

$firstDay = new Zend_Date('2010-02-28', 'YYYY-MM-dd'); $lastDay = new Zend_Date('2010-03-01', 'YYYY-MM-dd'); $diff = $lastDay->sub($firstDay)->toValue(); $days = ceil($diff/60/60/24) +1; return $days; this gives the right answer


11

Technically, @stefgosselin gave the correct answer for Zend_Date, but Zend_Date is completely overkill for just getting the current time in a common format. Zend_Date is incredibly slow and cumbersome to use compared to PHP's native date related extensions. If you don't need translation or localisation in your Zend_Date output (and you apparently dont), stay ...


8

I've ran into this problem as well. In the Zend_Date class 'YYYY' means to a 4 digit representation of the 'ISO year' where as 'yyyy' means a 4 digit representation of the 'year'.


7

I believe the problem is in your part string. Try YYYY-MM-dd instead. $day1 = new Zend_Date('2010-02-28', 'YYYY-MM-dd'); $day2 = new Zend_Date('2010-03-01', 'YYYY-MM-dd'); echo $day2->sub($day1)->toString(Zend_Date::DAY);


6

Here's the logic, laid out: $days_per_week = 7; $weekdays = array_flip(array('sun', 'mon', 'tue', 'wed', 'thu', 'fri', 'sat')); $day_wanted = 'mon'; $days_forward = ( $weekdays[$day_wanted] - $date->get(Zend_Date::WEEKDAY_DIGIT) + $days_per_week ) % $days_per_week; $date->addDay($days_forward); That works nicely for any $day_wanted.


6

I've encountered scenarios where I've wanted to do this. Here is the solution that I've used: Created an extended row class for Zend_Db_Table_Row and overloaded the __get() and __set() super-methods In the specific classes/tables that I want to use date objects, created the appropriate methods to do the heavy lifting Here is a dumbed-down version of the ...


5

How about $firstFridayOfOcober = strtotime('first friday of october'); Or turn it into a handy function:- /** * Returns a timestamp for the first friday of the given month * @param string $month * @return type int */ function firstFriday($month) { return strtotime("first friday of $month"); } You could use this with Zend_Date like this:- ...


5

Pass the 3rd parameter to toString(): $a = Zend_Date::now(); $a->setOptions(array('format_type' => 'php')); $a->toString('l, d F Y', null, 'pl'); // wtorek, 12 stycznia 2010


5

You can override the native datatypes to use Zend_Date instead of PHP's native DateTime which is the default for Doctrine data types 'datetime', 'time', and 'date'. First in your application Bootstrap file, add the following BEFORE you instantiate your Doctrine EntityManager. This code should come before any other Doctrine code: ...


4

Perhaps you can try setting the date to 31st Dec of current year, and querying the week number?


4

Start by finding the first monday, then you can just add 1 week until the year increments. <?php define('NL', "\n"); $year = 2010; $firstDayOfYear = mktime(0, 0, 0, 1, 1, $year); $nextMonday = strtotime('monday', $firstDayOfYear); $nextSunday = strtotime('sunday', $nextMonday); while (date('Y', $nextMonday) == $year) { echo ...


4

That's an unfortunate bug. I got around it by calling setTime() twice for each date: ... $a->setTime('04:00:00', 'HH:mm:ss'); $a->setTime('04:00:00', 'HH:mm:ss'); ... $b->setTime('00:00:00', 'HH:mm:ss'); $b->setTime('00:00:00', 'HH:mm:ss'); ... $c->setTime('04:00:00', 'HH:mm:ss'); $c->setTime('04:00:00', 'HH:mm:ss'); ... ...


4

Doctrine2 expects PHP DateTime objects for DQL date and datetime types. If you are not forced to use a Zend_Date, to this: ->setStartDateTime(new DateTime('2011-09-01T22:00:00')) Else, convert it to a DateTime: new DateTime('@' . $zendDate->getTimestamp()) See DateTime docs.


4

i dont know in zend but surely you can use date('Y-m-d',strtotime('next monday')); in php


4

The problem is the Zend_Validate_Date doesn't correctly deal with timestamps. One option would be to normalize the $value by passing it through date and strtotime to trim off any times. $value = date("Y-m-d", strtotime($value)); this will make the date always be YYYY-MM-DD Another would be to create your own Timestamp validator the only requirment ...


4

Zend_Date supports fa_IR dates, but I don't believe it will do calendar conversions from Gregorian to Jalali. You will have to set date manually. However, here is how you use Zend_Locale with Zend_Date for fa_IR // Manual conversion from Gregorian date 7/7/2011 to Jalali date 1390/4/16 $date = new Zend_Date('1390/4/16'); $date->setLocale('fa_IR'); ...


4

Problem is your cache lifetime is really low. Zend_Date uses Zend_Locale, that parses some XMLs (not very small ones), which takes lots and lots of time. Create special cache instance with extremely long lifetime (or better tie it to a files' modified time) and set that to both Zend_Date and Zend_Locale. That should speedup things dramatically. But it's not ...


4

Please see: http://framework.zend.com/issues/browse/ZF-6369 Basically what it comes down to is that the code underlying the format validation doesn't work correctly. Rather than using strict validation, it will try to coerce the provided date into something that will validate and so you get hanky results. It does look like the bug has been marked as ...


3

You can implement a Custom Mapping Type or use this ZendDateType implementation. You may find this guide helpful.


3

I don't think Zend_Date is built to 'enforce' a format. It's built to answer "If I give Zend_Date this string, can you shove it in this format?" It's really misleading. In your example, it's true, but it actually evaluates to: Jan 25, 35 12:00:00 AM Which you probably didn't expect. In your bogus example, it's also true, it evaluates to: Dec 14, 34 ...


3

$cerimonia = new Zend_Date('your date here'); $days = $cerimonia->sub(Zend_Date::now()); $days = round($days/86400)+1;


3

This should be better documented in the manual, as it's a pretty common use case. Fortunately it's nice and easy: $date->setTimezone($user->timezone); echo $date->get(Zend_Date::TIME_SHORT); //prints in user timezone


3

To add to Noah's answer, Zend_Validate_Date is really quite awful and inflexible; that is if you want to have a more forgiving policy for date entry. Now, if ZF shipped with a Zend_Filter_Date that would normalize the various trivial (albeit very parseable) formats date selectors / user input supplies, that might be a different story as you could filter the ...


3

a simple way to use Zend Date is to make specific function in its business objects that allows to parameter this function the date format. You can find a good example to this address http://www.pylejeune.fr/framework/utiliser-les-date-avec-zend_date/


2

I'm running ZF 1.9.4 and PHP 5.2.10 on Ubuntu and was able to reproduce the exact same problem you had. Being the curious type, I did a little digging. Within the code for isDate, a call was made first to getDate within the companion class Zend_Locale_Format. This is wrapped around a try-catch loop, so within the catch portion, I had it dump the exception to ...


2

I've extended Zend_Date for my own convenience functions. My solution is similar to Nisanth's, with some key differences: calculate the beginning of the day for both days before comparing use round() instead of ceil() do not add 1 to the result Example code: class My_Date extends Zend_Date { public static function now($locale = null) { ...


2

Nicky, You don't really need Zend_Date for this as the PHP intrinsic DateTime and DateTimeZone objects work well for this; however, I can point you in the right direction if you really need to use Zend_Date. See the following examples $date = new Zend_Date(1234567890, false, $locale); $date->toString... (see: ...



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