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10

You can use a try/except block for this. def foo(x,y): try: answer = x/y except ZeroDivisionError: answer = 0 return answer >>> foo(5,0) 0 >>> foo(6,2) 3.0


10

Check if the denominator is zero before dividing. This avoids the overhead of catching the exception, which may be more efficient if you expect to be dividing by zero a lot. def weird_division(n, d): return n / d if d else 0


4

I think try except (as in Cyber's answer) is usually the best way (and more pythonic: better to ask forgiveness than to ask permission!), but here's another: def safe_div(x,y): if y == 0: return 0 return x / y One argument in favor of doing it this way, though, is if you expect ZeroDivisionErrors to happen often, checking for 0 ...


4

def foo(x, y): return 0 if y == 0 else x / y


2

n3376 quotes 8.5/11 If no initializer is specified for an object, the object is default-initialized; if no initialization is performed, an object with automatic or dynamic storage duration has indeterminate value. [ Note: Objects with static or thread storage duration are zero-initialized, see 3.6.2. — end note ] 8.5/6 To ...


1

The logic is quite simple: Default I initialization of a class just default initializes all members. Default initialization of built-in types leaves member uninitialized. Accessing an uninitialized object yields undefined behavior. Undefined behavior can do anything it wants. Both compilers provide "correct" results. Note that causing nasal demons to be ...


1

Foo foo; This default-initializes foo, and since Foo's default constructor is trivial, it effectively doesn't initialize it at all, so foo._bar can hold any value (including 0). Foo() This value-initializes the temporary object, which in case of trivial default constructor means zero-initialization, so Foo()._bar is equal to 0.


1

Default initialisation, of classes like this without user-defined constructors, does nothing, leaving each trivial member with an indeterminate value. Value initialisation will zero-initialise each member. In the first case, you're printing: the indeterminate value of a default-initialised Foo foo; the zero value of a value-initialised Foo() the ...


1

That is so because the number is converted into a string to be displayed. And: # to_d converts to BigDecimal, just FYI "-0".to_d.to_s #=> "-0.0" Therefore you will have to make it a 0 yourself. But the sign-checks are redundant - a simple comparison with 0 will do the trick: bdn = "-0".to_d # or BigDecimal.new("-0") value = bdn.zero? ? 0 : bdn ...


1

SELECT SUM(IF(MONTH = 1, numRecords, NULL)) AS 'January', SUM(IF(MONTH = 2, numRecords, NULL)) AS 'Feburary', SUM(IF(MONTH = 3, numRecords, NULL)) AS 'March', SUM(IF(MONTH = 4, numRecords, NULL)) AS 'April', SUM(IF(MONTH = 5, numRecords, NULL)) AS 'May', SUM(IF(MONTH = 6, numRecords, NULL)) AS 'June', SUM(IF(MONTH = 7, ...


1

After struggling with the problem a little longer this was the solution. IIf([F1]="2",IIf(F2]<>[F1],-4.76,IIf([F1]="3",IIf([F2]<>[F1],-1))),0)


1

echo %time: =0% echo %time: =% The first line changes spaces to 0, the second one removes spaces. Use the one better fits your problem


1

You can do (A+B)/((A!=0) + (B!=0)) to get [,1] [,2] [,3] [1,] 1 1 2 [2,] 2 3 2 [3,] 3 2 2 Here != tests for equality with zero returning TRUE or FALSE. When we add those up, the TRUEs are treated like 1 and the FALSEs become 0. You can do this with a list of matrices as well list_mat_vect<-list(A,B) Reduce("+", ...


1

I believe that the hasOne relationship creates a LEFT JOIN in the SQL statement. Arguably, the generated SQL for your find would look something like (assume there are more columns though): SELECT User.id, User.name, Profile.id FROM users AS User LEFT JOIN profiles AS Profile ON Profile.user_id = User.id; All you need to do is add another WHERE clause: ...



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