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3

This line (zmq:with-socket (socket context zmq:rep) creates this error The variable ZEROMQ:REP is unbound. Means: it is a variable and it has no value. It does not matter if the symbol is exported or not. To me it looks like the code expects a keyword symbol :rep as a socket type descriptor instead of your zmq:rep. Another case of a bad macro ...


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Had the same problem a while ago. Here is what I did to solve this: Download the right ZMQ version The "download link" provided on the ZMQ website seems outdated. To really get the current version you would have to use Git: git clone https://github.com/zeromq/libzmq.git Build with Visual Studio 2015 The repository comes with a pre-build Visual Studio ...


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Happy man! ZeroMQ is a lovely & powerfull tool for highly scaleable, low-overheads, Formal Communication ( behavioural, yes emulating some sort of the peers mutual behaviour "One Asks, the other Replys" et al ) Patterns. Your pattern is quite simple, behaviourally-unrestricted and ZMQ_PAIR may serve well for this. Performance There ought be some ...


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You are using the Request socket from multiple threads, which is not supported. You are sending on the main thread and receiving on the poller thread. Instead of using regular queue try to use NetMQQueue, you can add it to the poller and enqueue from the UI thread. Then the sending is happening on the poller thread as well as the receiving. You can read ...


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Answering in reverse order... Your 3 'messages' are the 3 frames of the recieved message. The first frame is added by the Router socket to identify where the message came from. The 2nd is an empty delimiter frame added by the Requester socket and the final frame contains the data you sent. This leads on to why you don't get a response, when a dealer ...


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You need to use the c++ compiler, not the c compiler: > gcc -Wall -o HardwareHub HardwareHub.cpp should be > g++ -Wall -o HardwareHub HardwareHub.cpp In case your currently installed GCC version doesn't support the current c++ standard use > g++ -std=c++11 -Wall -o HardwareHub HardwareHub.cpp


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A: Yes, there is ZeroMQ is a wonderfull toolbox. After many years I would dare to say, any of it's pre-built Scaleable Formal Communication Pattern to be a basic pattern. Each one is rather an example of a formal behaviour and sure, there are many cases, when these trivial behavioural pattern do not fit the needs the software Projects would like to have and ...


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Step 0: isolate the sweet-spot As proposed in comments above, kindly update, run & post output from a trivial self-diagnosing code modification: int main () { zmq::context_t context (1); // std::cout << "[1] .... + errno; // ----------------------------[1] zmq::socket_t socket (context, ZMQ_REQ); // std::cout << "[2]...


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You can use the transform method of JavaDStream which gets a Function2 s parameter. The Function2 gets a RDD and a Time object and returns a new RDD. The overall result will be a new JavaDStream in which RDD have been trasformed accord the logic you have chosen.


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As mentioned by @vahapt you can modify the dynamic port range using netsh. However, a better solution may be to use netsh to reserve the ports required by your application, leaving alone the default range of dynamic ports. To do so: On Server 2008/2008 R2, install this Microsoft hotfix. This is not required on Server 2012 or later. Stop any processes ...



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