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0

You can add this to your git config and zsh won't check the status anymore git config --add oh-my-zsh.hide-status 1


0

Just downloading and installing the fonts is not enough. In order to get the Powerline symbols, you need to tell Terminal to use one of the patched fonts you downloaded. This can be done from the menu Terminal->Preferences.... In Settings->Text click on the button Change... in the section Font. Choose any font with "Powerline" in its name and you should ...


-2

Using @echo "[<Message / $(Variable)>]" seems to work fine. On Ubuntu 12.04.4 LTS with GNU Make 3.81. Makefile: .PHONY: print_package NPM_PACKAGE := 1 NPM_VERSION := 2 GITHUB_PROJECT := 3 print_package: @echo "[Printing Package]" @echo "[Package Version] $(NPM_PACKAGE).$(NPM_VERSION).$(GITHUB_PROJECT)" Output: ...


3

It doesn't matter what shell you are using. Make will always use /bin/sh as the shell it invokes (unless you specifically set the SHELL make variable to something else). Think what a disaster it would be if make used whatever shell the user was using to invoke recipes! On many GNU/Linux systems, /bin/sh is actually a link to bash. On other GNU/Linux ...


2

The zsh completion system works very well here, and the solution is very simple, just put double-quotes around the readlink argument in the script: somecommand --url $1 $(readlink -f "$2") The point is that without quotes readlink removes backslashes which escape whitespaces. Compare three results: 1. Without backslashes and quotes readlink -f assumes ...


2

Edit as pointed out by chepner: since (i) takes a pattern, ${foo[(i)[\']]} should and does work as expected. F̶i̶r̶s̶t̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶a̶l̶l̶,̶ ̶t̶h̶i̶s̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶h̶o̶w̶ ̶I̶ ̶t̶h̶i̶n̶k̶ ̶y̶o̶u̶ ̶s̶h̶o̶u̶l̶d̶ ̶d̶o̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶s̶t̶i̶t̶u̶t̶i̶o̶n̶ ̶l̶i̶k̶e̶ ̶t̶h̶i̶s̶:̶ echo "${foo[(i)']}" #or echo "$foo[(i)']" N̶o̶w̶,̶ ̶i̶t̶ ̶s̶e̶e̶m̶s̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶m̶e̶ ̶t̶h̶a̶t̶ ...


1

If you're on OS X (and possibly Linux), you can modify your /etc/paths file to explicitly set what's in $PATH. ~$ cat /etc/paths /usr/local/bin /usr/local/sbin /usr/bin /bin /usr/sbin /sbin ~$ Looks like this should work for zsh. https://github.com/Homebrew/homebrew/issues/25407


0

you can disable the RVM ruby for your work with CocoaPods: rvm use system to get back to rvm controlled ruby: rvm use ruby


3

You are pre-pending your extra path to $PATH before RVM is adding it's own paths. You should move your path after any rvm setup is done in your ZSH configs. Somewhere you will find something like the following: source "$HOME/.rvm/scripts/rvm" You should perform your actions after this instead of before. source "$HOME/.rvm/scripts/rvm" export ...


1

A simple workaround –not the solution to your real problem which I can’t help you with as I don’t use RVM– would be to uninstall the gems from your RVM installation, that way your shell will no longer find the bin in any of those RVM locations.


1

I installed zshell today, and although everything works perfect, every command i send executes then show the message: zsh: command not found: shell So far, it hasn't changed anything, performance wise, but it is pretty annoying. I tried all the steps above, to no avail. Any ideas as to why the message is showing, how to fix it, and what script is trying ...


0

zstyle ':completion:*:complete:(cd|pushd):*' group-name '' zstyle ':completion:*:complete:(cd|pushd):*' format ' '


3

If you're "using zsh on ubuntu" then you are not using bash. bash and zsh are two different shells, which have slightly different behaviours. In both shells, ! introduces a history expansion, which replaces the ! and following word with something taken from the command history. In zsh, !{0} will be replaced with the previous command you typed which started ...


0

I'm assuming this is Linux? If yes, cpusets are probably what you're looking for. There is also a cpuset userspace package that supposedly makes it easier to use the cpusets mechanism in the kernel. While I have almost no experience with this, I think you should be able to create a cgroup, move your shell to it, and restrict the cgroup to use only the ...


0

This could happen if your /tmp (or wherever your $TMPDIR points) were read-only. You should be able to discover what's wrong by attaching strace to the zsh you're running the above from, using e.g. strace -ff -s200 -o /tmp/zsh.log -p PID-goes-here from a different shell.


0

I couldn't get the above to work. Problem was that I had just reinstalled my Mac and forgotten to re-install grunt. You can test that grunt is actually installed and working properly outside of zshell by going back to bash with bash -l and running grunt. If grunt is throwing the same error you can install grunt by running: sudo npm install -g grunt-cli ...


0

Use | or & instead of usng || or &&


0

My issue was with displaying λ. I had to set "Character set" to UTF-8 in the MinTTY options.


1

Ok, rereading the question, it's the difference between this: $ val="foo???bar???baz" $ print -l ${(s.?.)val} foo bar baz And this: $ val="foo???bar???baz" $ print -l ${(~s.?.)val} foo???bar???baz It operates on the variable, i.e. the "argument" to the split (from your documentation quote). In the first example, we substitute literal ?, and in the ...


0

If you want your script to be a bit more portable you can do something like this: y=$(bash -c "read -n 1 c; echo \$c")


0

If the URL is not quoted, the backslashes may be necessary, that's why zsh adds them (via url-quote-magic). If you do not like them, then quote the URL: $ wget ' then paste the URL and type the ending quote: $ wget 'http://{DEFAULT_IP}/index.html' To disable the url-quote-magic feature entirely: zstyle ':urlglobber' url-other-schema


4

These visual problems usually occur when Vim cannot fully control the terminal: Basic stuff like screen updates work, but things that are handled differently in different terminals (like setting the background color) do not. Check and compare the values for $TERM in bash and zsh; it's likely the latter one is wrong. You shouldn't hard-code them in a startup ...


0

p () { $@; msg=$@ # If using Maverick you can spawn a notification like this: # http://apple.stackexchange.com/a/115373 cmd="display notification \"${msg}\" with title \"Command Finished\"" osascript -e "$cmd" }


1

In bash, you can access $BASH_COMMAND to see the literal, pre-parsing command being executed. Thus, while you can't prevent the shell from parsing an argument list, you can see its pre-parsed state. However -- this gives you only the entire argument; you need to do string-splitting yourself, if going this route. As such, I would describe this as an ...


0

In zsh, you can use the q parameter expansion flag, but it's messy. One q escapes individual characters as necessary; two expands the text in single quotes; three in double quotes. (The notation ${:-stuff} simply expands to the text following :-; it's a wrapper that allows you to create anonymous parameters.) $ echo "foo bar" foo bar $ echo ${(qq):-"foo ...


2

No, there is no way to disable the shell's quote handling. If you want this for your own convenience, reading arguments from a here document or similar might be acceptable. But if you want your users to be able to write quotes at the shell prompt and have them preserved, there is no way to do that (short of writing your own shell).


3

You would need to write the function like this: p () { $@ # execute cmd line growl "$@" # send notification } Then call it like this: p ls -al


1

I'm not sure you can split on patterns, only on literal text. (Although this being zsh, I may be wrong and just need to do a little more research.) However, I have found how to use the substitution modifier to replace strings of characters with a specific string which you can subsequently split on. (You'll need to set the hist_substpattern option to allow a ...


0

Try putting this zstyle ':completion:*' matcher-list 'r:[[:ascii:]]||[[:ascii:]]=** r:|=* m:{a-z\-}={A-Z\_}' Into your zshrc. It does exactly what you want, and it does it to zsh's own completion system, not to an external completion system.


1

When you see such a mess on the screen reset command is your friend. Basically it will reset all special characters to their default values and re-initializes your terminal. Most probably you have this command in the system under /usr/bin directory as a link to tset. If for any reasons reset is not present then you can run echo -e \\033c where \\033c is a ...


0

This is mentioned in man zshmisc under ALIASING: There is a commonly encountered problem with aliases illustrated by the following code: alias echobar=’echo bar’; echobar This prints a message that the command echobar could not be found. This happens because aliases are expanded when the code is read in; the entire line is read in ...


0

From the zsh man page: STARTUP/SHUTDOWN FILES Commands are first read from /etc/zshenv; this cannot be overridden.... So let's see what Mac OS X has in there by default: ➜ ~ cat /etc/zshenv # system-wide environment settings for zsh(1) if [ -x /usr/libexec/path_helper ]; then eval `/usr/libexec/path_helper -s` fi Ok, what is ...


0

In my (Ubuntu) zsh environment I don't see a behavioral difference, but I suspect in your case (perhaps related to something specific to OS X) it may have something to do with the fact that double quotes allow for full substitution, whereas single quotes do not. For example, if you run echo '$PATH', it will literally output $PATH, whereas echo "$PATH" will ...


0

Nevermind. Was something in my config. I uninstalled oh-my-zsh ran rm -rf .zsh* and re-installed oh-my-zsh and now it works: Last login: Tue Aug 26 19:01:26 on ttys000 ➜ ~ echo $PATH /usr/bin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/opt/X11/bin ➜ ~ . ./venvs/py_venv/bin/activate (py_venv)➜ ~ echo $PATH ...


3

Don't add your executable to one of the computer's (or user's) $PATH directory — add your executable in the proper place where it belongs. If someone's path is not right they need to correct it. Absolutely do not install your program in /bin, /sbin, or /usr/bin — those are reserved for the installed OS. A single or a small set of programs may be installed ...


0

I'm not sure I understand your question correctly but one option is to copy the executable or create a symbolic link to it in one of the standard directories for binaries /usr/bin or /usr/local/bin Read about Unix filesystem hierarchy here


0

You can either prefix your scp call using noglob (which will turn off globbing for that command, e.g. noglob ls *) or use autoload -U url-quote-magic zle -N self-insert url-quote-magic zstyle -e :urlglobber url-other-schema '[[ $words[1] == scp ]] && reply=("*") || reply=(http https ftp)' the above should make zsh auto quote * when you use scp. ...


0

UPDATE: still not working with release mentioned below, my mistake. Git push works Git pull doesn't. It seems to me that the issue has been fixed by Apple with Mac OS X Yosemite 10.10 (14A329r). i am on the general Beta Yosemite channel (not developer). Git push/pull works as expected again without any modifications.


0

Put the following line in your .zshrc, and restart terminal. export TERM=xterm It works for me.


1

As you pointed out in the comment to chepner answer terminator is a fork of gnome-terminal and it still uses a lot of functions from gnome. In fact it seems that the whole terminator VTE widget comes from gnome and gnome-terminal by defaults "supports" only 8 basic colors. You can check that with echotc Co command. It will return 8 for both of them and for ...


1

To avoid expansion of $(pwd) when defining the alias, you can use single quotes instead of double quotes: alias gopath='export GOPATH=$(pwd)' You could also escape the $ explicitly with \, while still using double quotes: alias gopath="export GOPATH=\$(pwd)" This comes in handy if you want to expand some parts during definition and others when using ...


2

use single quotes instead of double quotes. Variables and command substitutions are expanded inside double quotes. When you use single quotes, they're not expanded, but they'll be expanded later when the alias is substituted into the line. alias gopath='export GOPATH=$(pwd)'


1

You could use a function instead of an alias: def gopath { export GOPATH=$(pwd) }


1

I have faced the same problem before, my solution was disabling some zsh plugins. The second probability is that your colour theme may contain a bug which causing this. # Custom plugins may be added to ~/.oh-my-zsh/custom/plugins/ # Example format: plugins=(rails git textmate ruby lighthouse) plugins=(git) This is the final version of my plugin section in ...


0

http://zsh.sourceforge.net/Doc/Release/Zsh-Line-Editor.html#Character-Highlighting suggests that the value for fg be a single integer from 0 to 255: ZSH_HIGHLIGHT_STYLES[path]='fg=167' # Whatever color 167 is in the 256-color palette.


0

We are using ansible to provision our vagrant VMs. We just created another task to copy bash dotfiles into the home directory. https://github.com/hut6/vagrant-symfony/blob/0b9b4e96ae14d0b690e1a8a4f2bc870dcd855ce5/ansible/roles/init/tasks/main.yml#L28



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