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comment changing elements of a list vs changing the list itself
Yes. Think of it this way. Imagine you have a global variable called position that is a connection to a database. You can lookup that variable without a global declaration (because there is no local of the same name). Then you can use that connection to modify the database but no change the connection itself. When would need a global declaration? Only if you were assigning a new connection to position. In the first case, position remains unchanged and database changes. In the second case, position is changed to a different connection.
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revised changing elements of a list vs changing the list itself
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answered Efficiently look up large Python dictionaries
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answered Python counting zero-length control characters in string formatting width field?
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comment Is there an equivalent in Python of Fortran's “implicit none”?
@ikaros45 FWIW, In Python 3, dis() grew an option to send the output to a file. The core devs were conservative and didn't grow the API until there was a feature request. This helps the language avoid hyper-generalization and feature creep. Also, in Python 3, I added contextlib.redirect_stdout() so that you can re-route the stdout of any function that uses print(). The latter is a completely general solution that doesn't entail API expansion for every tool that uses print() to meet its primary use case.
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revised Is there an equivalent in Python of Fortran's “implicit none”?
Describe extensions and limitations
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revised Is there an equivalent in Python of Fortran's “implicit none”?
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revised Is there an equivalent in Python of Fortran's “implicit none”?
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answered Is there an equivalent in Python of Fortran's “implicit none”?
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comment How to call functions of next/previous object in list in Python
They are equivalent. The one using "self" is the preferred python style.
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revised How to call functions of next/previous object in list in Python
Handle the wrap-around case
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answered How to call functions of next/previous object in list in Python
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