8,606 reputation
44165
bio website linkedin.com/in/avidouglen
location Israel
age 39
visits member for 6 years, 3 months
seen Dec 23 at 11:31

Security expert and experienced Windows programmer


Dec
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
19
awarded  Good Question
Oct
9
awarded  Good Answer
Sep
15
awarded  Yearling
Aug
28
revised REST and CSRF (Cross-Site Request Forgery)
added tag
Aug
27
reviewed Approve jquery/ajax not working in ie9
Aug
27
reviewed Approve JSDoc: How do I document the “options” object literal?
Aug
27
reviewed Approve I want to read in my server another mdf ldf files
Aug
27
reviewed Reject changing image on hover but without changing the image position
Aug
4
awarded  Custodian
Jul
29
awarded  Custodian
Jul
29
reviewed Close Creating new popup window when click button
Jul
29
reviewed Approve tableview button not using correct indexPath
Jun
24
comment Is too much focus on testing benefits a bad thing overall?
@Raedwald okay, so consider it equivalent to this phrasing: "Is it possible to put TOO MUCH focus on testing" etc. It's not a tautology, because many TDD fans would say that there is no such thing as "too much".
May
17
comment Prevent Malware attack on my site
Depending on jurisdiction and definition of "looking", any misuse of the site could be a crime.
May
16
comment Prevent Malware attack on my site
@JosiahSouth I highly recommend against this. You don't have a signed contract or work request, you dont know what jurisdiction the site is in, you don't even know for sure if the OP is the actual owner of the site. You could accidentally get into a lot of trouble for this.
Apr
3
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
25
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
15
comment Protect PostgreSQL database connection
(Note that @Polynomial's comment re hashing with bcrypt et al refers to user passwords, not the database password, obviously. This is just useful advice, in general, since you seem blissfully unaware of how to store passwords.)
Mar
15
comment Protect PostgreSQL database connection
Most real world exploits are ALL about how passwords are stored on web applications. Almost every single large-scale exploit is exactly that. What you're saying about browsing source code is not an answer, it is the problem - no credentials should be in code. Have you never heard of Kerckhoff's Principle? Unfortunately, I am not well versed in PHP, that's why I was looking for PHP-specific solutions - there ARE solutions, starting with never keeping passwords in plain text.