Reputation
12,521
Top tag
Next privilege 15,000 Rep.
Protect questions
Badges
6 32 73
Newest
 Enlightened
Impact
~346k people reached

14h
revised Is it possible to declare two variables of different types in a for loop?
added 305 characters in body
19h
comment How do you add all elements in a vector together? c++
why are all of your variables global?
20h
comment How do you add all elements in a vector together? c++
while (NoOfItems > 0) { ... }
21h
comment C++ multiple forwarding of one reference: first copy and then move
any symbol beginning with an underscore followed by a capital letter is reserved for the implementation; change _T and _Ts to something else.
21h
comment Are there a way to log all python stdout and stder in a file?
what have you tried that isn't working?
2d
answered C++ - Copy Assignment Operator is Implicitly Deleted
Feb
5
comment Why should I prefer static constexpr int in a class over enum for class-level integral constants?
The question is about why I would want to replace an enum with a constexpr for an integer constant in a class. If there really is no advantage (besides it having an address) that's cool too.
Feb
5
comment Why should I prefer static constexpr int in a class over enum for class-level integral constants?
your last example only works if bitmask is declared as constexpr. I am aware of the various uses of constexpr unrelated to what I'm asking.
Feb
4
revised Why should I prefer static constexpr int in a class over enum for class-level integral constants?
edited title
Feb
4
comment Why should I prefer static constexpr int in a class over enum for class-level integral constants?
@zenith the question in that is "Isn't there some way to tell the compiler that constexpr int SOME_VALUE=27 means that SOME_VALUE should be treated only as a compile time constant and never an object with external linkage" and that is what the answers address. I am asking if there is any advantage to using static constexpr instead of enums that would motivate me to use them for class-level constants.
Feb
4
comment Why should I prefer static constexpr int in a class over enum for class-level integral constants?
@KeithThompson done
Feb
4
revised Why should I prefer static constexpr int in a class over enum for class-level integral constants?
added 12 characters in body
Feb
4
asked Why should I prefer static constexpr int in a class over enum for class-level integral constants?
Feb
4
comment Conversion from 'int' to non-scalar type 'Point" requested
The answer isn't wrong I just wanted to add why that specific error shows up.
Feb
4
comment Conversion from 'int' to non-scalar type 'Point" requested
The comma operator will evaluate all the expressions left to right, and the entire expression will evaluate to whatever the rightmost expression is. Note that this is different than the comma as part of the syntax in something like a function call.
Feb
4
comment Conversion from 'int' to non-scalar type 'Point" requested
It's not assignment because it's at point of creation, so it's trying to call Point(int) which doesn't exist.
Feb
4
comment Conversion from 'int' to non-scalar type 'Point" requested
minimum code to reproduce: struct Point { Point(int, int){} }; and Point p = (1, 2); Please try to reduce your questions to only leave what is necessary to demonstrate the problem. Leaving in all of the functions like display and move are unnecessary. Really you could take out the entire Chutist class because it's unrelated to your actual problem.
Feb
4
comment Conversion from 'int' to non-scalar type 'Point" requested
the reason OP gets the error is that (x, y) without anything out in front is just two expressions separated by the comma operator. This is equivalent to y in this case.
Jan
29
revised How to declare a Vector object in c++?
added 20 characters in body
Jan
29
answered How to declare a Vector object in c++?