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answered Converting seconds (clocks) to decimal format
Jul
25
comment std::unordered_set of pointers
@BaummitAugen - done
Jul
25
revised std::unordered_set of pointers
added 118 characters in body
Jul
25
answered std::unordered_set of pointers
Jul
21
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
15
answered What type of NAT combinations requires a TURN server?
Jul
14
awarded  Famous Question
Jul
11
revised NSConnection - how to properly do “unvending” of an object?
added 2 characters in body
Jul
11
accepted NSConnection - how to properly do “unvending” of an object?
Jul
10
comment FORTRAN is faster than C - for a matrix multiplication program running on a same processor, why?
There will be plenty of speculation with a question like this, but no one will be able to give you an accurate answer unless you show both the Fortran and C code with your question. Explaining how you measured your benchmarks is a good idea too. Details about what tools, compilers, and compiler flags passed would be useful too.
Jul
9
comment P2P communication is not working Java
P2P socket networking with NAT traversal is very challenging and not an exact science. Ideally, you have traffic monitoring utilities on both sides of the NATs to diagnose these types of problems.
Jul
9
answered P2P communication is not working Java
Jul
6
comment Command required to grep only latest unique MSISDN from data
Some sample lines of data would be useful. I suspect the entire problem can be solved with sort, cut, and uniq
Jul
5
revised NSConnection - how to properly do “unvending” of an object?
added 484 characters in body
Jul
5
answered NSConnection - how to properly do “unvending” of an object?
Jul
5
comment NSConnection - how to properly do “unvending” of an object?
Good idea. And in production code both timeouts and try/catch blocks are a must have for working with NSConnection code. Timeouts won't resolve #1. But I think I figured out an answer that satisfies #1 and #2.
Jul
5
asked NSConnection - how to properly do “unvending” of an object?
Jul
4
comment C Program daemon uses 100% cpu usage
Similarly, the write call passes strlen(bufferRead). If multiple packets got coalesced or fragmented (as often happens with TCP), the receiver on the other end won't have a delimiter to determine message start and end.
Jul
4
comment C Program daemon uses 100% cpu usage
Security hole - Your code is not validating that the messages you consume from read are null terminated. A hacker could send you a message that is exactly BUFFER_READ_SIZE in length. Your corresponding strlen and strcmp functions on that buffer could lead to bad behavior. Simple fix would be to pass sizeof(bufferRead)-1 to the read call since you are already zero'ing it out.
Jul
2
awarded  Nice Question