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Sep
9
answered Where in the Fetch-Execute cycle is a value via an address mode decoded
Sep
7
awarded  Revival
Sep
4
comment Why are complicated memcpy/memset superior?
Tune memcopy today, and your tuned version can be deployed to every existing PC in the market. Tune REP MOVS, and it can only be deployed to future CPUs. (Could use microcode patch, but that is mainly used for security holes. Plus, ucode patch has overhead.)
Sep
4
comment Why are complicated memcpy/memset superior?
@GuySirton: I like your point about "(not) going back to the legacy portion of the design". It is very accurate. // It is overall true that a well tuned REP MOVS can beat a well tuned memcopy or memmove - especially if the decision overhead can be reduced. But if only because STA_WC is a feature not available to normal programmers. But... somebody at Intel would have to budget for the effort to tune REP MOVS on every processor generation. Whereas, if you don't retune REP MOVS, then the user has to retune - but later. // i.e. separate memcopy is JIT - don't retune until problem found.
Sep
4
comment Why are complicated memcpy/memset superior?
REP MOVS uses a cache protocol feature that is not available to regular code. Basically like SSE streaming stores, but in a manner that is compatible with normal memory ordering rules, etc. // The "large overhead for choosing and setting up the right method" is mainly due to the lack of microcode branch prediction. I have long wished that I had implemented REP MOVS using a hardware state machine rather than microcode, which could have completely eliminated the overhead.
Aug
30
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
22
comment Observing stale instruction fetching on x86 with self-modifying code
If you look further, you will see patents relating to SMC on which I am an inventor. AFAIK I invented the I$ and ITLB inclusion mechanisms of P6 to snoop "instructions in flight". // I consider these to be mistakes. I think that it would have been easier to create to create a fully associative CAM with the instruction blocks of all instructions in the pipeline, physical. With a bloom filter if you want to save power. // I think they were mistakes (a) because complicated and hard to get correct, even though they saved a lot of gates, and (b) glass jaws in performance.
Aug
22
answered Observing stale instruction fetching on x86 with self-modifying code
Aug
22
answered How is x86 instruction cache synchronized?
Aug
22
comment How is x86 instruction cache synchronized?
"TLB exists for MMU and for all levels of Caches inside and/or outside of processor cores." - actually no, not for most CPUs. Not for caches that are physically indexed and physically tagged. Some x86 CPUs may have an L2 TLB, but that does not necessarily have anything to do with the L2 cache. As far as I know no x86 has an L3 TLB. However, one of my favorite implementations puts the L2 TLB and the L2 unified I/D cache in the same physical array - so that you have a sngle structure. // You may be thinking of GPUs, which often have virtual caches, with TLBs at each.
Aug
10
comment Linux C++: how to profile time wasted due to cache misses?
AMD IBS (Instruction ased Sampling) is relevant here.
Aug
10
comment Linux C++: how to profile time wasted due to cache misses?
Unfortunately, on many machines the PC (Ip in x86 land) of the instruction that caused the cache miss is not available. The PC (IP) of the instruction that is stalling retirement waiting for the cache miss to come back is available, but not the PC that it is waiting on. We don't even have, easy to hand, what the stalling instruction is waiting on - all it knows is that it is waiting on an input register. // Now, some more recent processors route the PC all the way to the memory units, to do stuff like STLF prediction. If I were still at Intel I'd have done this already.
Aug
10
revised Mercurial: Merging one file between branches in one repo
added 8 characters in body
Aug
4
answered Does Intel C++ compiler have bounds checking?
Jul
31
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
28
revised Linux C++: how to profile time wasted due to cache misses?
added 2 characters in body
Jul
28
comment Linux C++: how to profile time wasted due to cache misses?
@Mike_Dunlavey: mea culpa. Both as a CPU architect, and as the CPU architect responsible for making it possible to profile on cache misses (EMON profiling). But, I'm also a performance analyst, was a perf analyst before I became a CPU architect. If I knew of a cheap way to measure exactly how much time is being lost to cache misses, I would have built it. In the mean time, the best I can think of doing is to describe what is being measured.
Jul
28
revised Linux C++: how to profile time wasted due to cache misses?
typos
Jul
28
comment Linux C++: how to profile time wasted due to cache misses?
However, spending 50% of the time with the program counter at retirement stalled pointing to a cache miss is NOT the same as saying that the program is spending 50% of its time in cache misses, or that the program would double in speed if all cache misses were removed. In a speculative machine a cache miss may not stall retirement, but may stall another instruction that itself stalls retirement.
Jul
23
comment #includes within a namespace, to “embed” prewritten stuff in namespace
Thanks for the detailed answer to an old question.