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Currently available for (limited) contract work. Remote or in Southern California.


Oct
16
comment How Facebook, SnapChat, or Gmail iOS apps prevent Fiddler decrypting their https traffic?
"You can't protect your own app" This is not correct. Some of these applications are performing trust evaluation using SSL pinning, which you can implement in your own application, and is immune to this type of man in the middle attack. Apple has a tech note that details HTTPS trust evaluation. developer.apple.com/library/ios/technotes/tn2232/_index.html
Oct
16
comment Why is XCode flaky about throwing duplicate symbol errors?
"I share a constants file across both targets." Well, there's your problem right there (assuming those targets are at some point part of the same compilation unit)
Oct
16
comment EXC_BAD_ACCESS when creating NSPredicate with NSDates
EXC_BAD_ACCESS means something is getting over released. Instruments can tell you what, and when. It would also be helpful to post the stack trace of the crash in your question.
Oct
16
comment Updated core data concurrency documentation?
"in this document, thread confinement and queue confinement are synonymous terms." That's not what it says. It says: "You can use threads, serial operation queues, or dispatch queues for concurrency. For the sake of conciseness, this article uses “thread” throughout to refer to any of these." The document is still talking about thread confinement exclusively. The document was never updated for queue confinement.
Oct
16
comment Can I use HTTP caching with an NSURLSessionDownloadTask on iOS?
What is the behavior you are seeing?
Oct
16
comment Updated core data concurrency documentation?
You seem to be confused by the portions of the documentation that are referring to the thread or queue of the caller, not the context. In that case, thread and queue are being used interchangeably - but that is only in reference to thread confinement. Core Data queue confinement, which was introduced in 2012, does not have those concerns.
Oct
15
comment Updated core data concurrency documentation?
No, it does not use them interchangeably, and in fact is explicitly differentiates between the two: "thread (or serialized queue) confinement" , etc. It then goes on to detail the differences between thread confinement and queue confinement when explaining the 3 different constant values that can be passed to initWithConcurrencyType:. You will note that CONFINEMENT is described as different from the two QUEUE based constants. It is also called out as being a legacy value, and described as implementing queue confinement.
Oct
15
comment Updated core data concurrency documentation?
I understand the topic quite well. The key point is "in this document". That document does not cover queue confinement as we know it now. The document does not describe queue confinement as it is today at all. Queue confinement was introduced in 2011, if you look at the revision history for that document you will see that it was not updated with anything relevant to queue confinement since then other than the disclaimer about best practices changing. Thread confinement is obsolete. The concurrency guide does not reflect that.
Oct
15
comment Updated core data concurrency documentation?
Thread confinement only allows access to a context created on that thread. Queue confinement allows access from any thread, and the context is free to manage however many threads it wants. Operations performed on the context are managed through the queue by the context. Queue confinement and thread confinement are not synonymous.
Oct
15
comment Updated core data concurrency documentation?
The documentation you are referring to is outdated, and was written well before queue confinement was introduced. This is why at the very top of the document you are quoting it states "Best practices for concurrency with Core Data have changed dramatically since this document was written; please note that this chapter does not represent current recommendations.". Thread confinement and queue confinement are different paradigms for CD concurrency - they are NOT synonyms.
Oct
15
comment Updated core data concurrency documentation?
"Thread confinement is still required." This is not the case at all, and thread confinement has been obsolete for some time. Queue confinement has been the recommended paradigm for quite a while.
Oct
13
answered Can I use HTTP caching with an NSURLSessionDownloadTask on iOS?
Oct
12
comment Update Core Data store location to support App Groups
Core Data uses file coordination when accessing files in the default store types. If you are going to access these files directly - again, not recommended - you should only do so using file coordination. This ensures you are not modifying files while the Core Data framework is using them. NSFileManager would be used within the file coordination block in this case. Again, the preferred way to do any of this is through Core Data APIs, but if you must access the files directly for some bizarre reason, make sure you do so using the file coordination APIs.
Oct
12
awarded  Revival
Oct
10
comment Can I use HTTP caching with an NSURLSessionDownloadTask on iOS?
Why do you want to override willCacheResponse?
Oct
9
comment Why didn't JSON parser catch non-validated data?
This isn't throwing an exception, it's crashing. Your NSData may be getting released.
Oct
8
comment NSManagedObject is automatically set to fault
The save caused the behavior you are seeing.
Oct
8
comment iOS 8 App crashing when resetting my NSManagedObjectContext while in a performBlock
If you are using queue confinement you should be using parent-child, other wise you will see problems like this.
Oct
8
comment iOS 8 App crashing when resetting my NSManagedObjectContext while in a performBlock
As the poster points out, he is using queue confinement with performBlock, which is safe to call from any thread.
Oct
8
comment iOS 8 App crashing when resetting my NSManagedObjectContext while in a performBlock
"one of my NSManagedObjectContext". This seems to indicate you have more than one. Are they parent-child, or peers?