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bio website movingsql.com
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coder & programmer of many defunct languages...

8m
answered In a SQL database, how do I delete records from Table_B when matching id is already deleted from Table_A?
23m
comment Compressing row set using CLR and GZIP
How large are these rowsets that you are trying to compress?
40m
revised VBA ADO Bind Variables
edited tags
49m
comment SQL in syntax comparison in proper order
The obvious question: WHY? As in, Why do you need it to be shorter than that?
Jan
22
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
20
comment Stored procedure insert if column contains then rollback
You should probably just show us the code. Failing that, How are you finding out that the column contains invalid characters?
Jan
20
comment Why is my task in “WaitingForActivation” status after calling SqlCommand.BeginExecuteNonQuery?
Is it possible that another thread is using (or trying to use) the same SqlCommand object?
Jan
20
comment SQL Server 2012 Filtering Results Based on One Table and Appending Info
show us what you have so far.
Jan
20
comment Algorithm for matching point sets
The formula that you are using to calculate d(a,b) is not at all obvious. Please clarify.
Jan
20
answered Available date range by year
Jan
20
comment Why is this an Index Scan and not a Index Seek?
@NandhaKumar There's no simple answer to this and a complete answer is way too much for these comments. Basically it's the difference between the sequential IO throughput (scan) of your disks vs. their random IOs per second (seeks). That's how we used to calculate it back in the 70's but today there are so many performance enhancements that affect this (RAID, Mirrors, caches at all levels, etc.) that it is difficult to measure and even harder to predict. I believe that the SQL optimizer assumes some ratio of Seek rows to Scan rows of like 5%-10%.
Jan
19
comment How to check for output table of called stored procedure?
@Jeremy only if it was created by the calling stored procedure, or some execution context that called it. Local #temp tables that are created by a called stored procedure are deleted when that procedure exits. The answerer here is effectively correct, as 99% of the time when someone says, as the OP has, "has an output temporary table", they mean one created by that procedure.
Jan
19
comment SQL correlated query confusion
What is your question?
Jan
19
comment Stored proc is assigning incorrect value to bit variable
An output parameter is a third type of output that a stored procedure can have. It's the easiest form for other SQL statements to consume, so you may want to use that instead.
Jan
19
comment Stored proc is assigning incorrect value to bit variable
This was explained in your previous question. A stored procedures return value is what is specified by a RETURN statement, which has to be an integer. Nothing else is it's "return value". It cannot return a SELECT statement, that's an entirely different type of procedure output, that SQL can only consume with the INSTERT .. EXEC.. statement.
Jan
19
revised SQL server scripting object date and database completeness
added 129 characters in body
Jan
19
answered SQL server scripting object date and database completeness
Jan
19
comment SQL server scripting object date and database completeness
This is readily do-able in T-SQL.
Jan
19
comment What is the best way to generate configurable yet simple reports
FYI: Questions asking "What is the Best way to do this..?" will get closed here for being primarily opinion based. Instead, change your question to merely "How Can I do this..?"
Jan
19
comment How to stop results of nested stored procedure showing up at top level?
The syntax: EXEC @var1 = dbo.pr2 will only receive the value of a RETURN statement executed in the called procedure, and only if it is an integer. To return the results of a SELECT, you would need to use the INSERT ... EXEC ... syntax.