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Jan
10
comment Is it possible to implement foldl/foldr using unsided fold?
"Note though that foldr and foldl are inherently sequential. So, this trick has to give up any parallelism you have in your implementation of fold and map." Now, let's be careful with this statement, and distinguish between the specific foldr/fold implementations, and folds in general. Many left and right folds can be parallelized by using a parallel prefix scan algorithm; read in that light, your statement here is false. The fold/Endo implementation of foldr/fold, however, won't parallelize; read that way, your statement is true.
Jan
8
awarded  Guru
Jan
2
comment Why does Data.Set require elements to be an instance of Ord?
@leftaroundabout: Actually, in Java, the Object class has the hashCode and equals methods, and HashMap/HashSet use those; you're supposed to override them in order to get correct behavior with hash-based collections. This leads to three of the most common bugs I see among Java newcomers: (a) not knowing or forgetting to implement hashCode and equals for your map keys; (b) implementing the hashCode method incorrectly; and (c) implementing hashCode as return toString().hashCode(), with horrible performance...
Jan
2
comment Is it possible?: Behavior t [Behavior t a] -> Behavior t [a]
To generalize my earlier point a bit: another way of looking at this is with representable functors: any Functor isomorphic to (->) r (for some r) is a Monad. In the case of FRP, there is an isomorphism between Behavior and (->) Time in the metalanguage that we use to state the model, but in the object language we cannot implement such a thing.
Jan
2
comment Is it possible?: Behavior t [Behavior t a] -> Behavior t [a]
@J.Abrahamson: I don't know reactive-banana, but Conal's "Push-pull functional programming" does have time :: Behavior Time whose model is the Time -> Time identity.
Jan
2
comment Is it possible?: Behavior t [Behavior t a] -> Behavior t [a]
@PetrPudlák: in the Reader type it's possible to define the monadic join using the Applicative instance: join ra = runReader <$> ra <*> ask. I think we can see the issue in this light: Behavior lacks a counterpart to runReader.
Jan
2
revised Is it possible to do the Free Monad in Clojure?
deleted 4 characters in body
Dec
31
answered Haskell Parse Error in Helper Function
Dec
24
revised Why should I use case expressions if I can use “equations”?
edited body
Dec
24
answered Why should I use case expressions if I can use “equations”?
Dec
22
accepted Proving the Functor laws for free monads; am I doing it right?
Dec
21
comment Proving the Functor laws for free monads; am I doing it right?
@ChrisTaylor Ok, I'm confused a little bit. Why are the (b) cases labeled "Inductive case" if we're using coinduction? Likewise for the "Base case" label on the (a) cases—I thought "base case" implied well-foundedness, and coinduction didn't?
Dec
21
comment Proving the Functor laws for free monads; am I doing it right?
@DanielWagner If i understand it right, it's because we have cases like fix (Free . Identity), which don't contain Pure anywhere...
Dec
21
awarded  Announcer
Dec
21
asked Proving the Functor laws for free monads; am I doing it right?
Dec
19
comment Unit testing several implementations of a functional data structure without code duplication
Well, don't get me wrong, what you tried is a common and reasonable testing strategy as well, but it has two important limitations, and it's good to understand them. First, as I said, it doesn't prove correctness, only equivalence of implementation. Second, it falls apart in problems where there exists more than one correct answer; two implementations may produce different answers that are nonetheless both correct.
Dec
17
comment Unit testing several implementations of a functional data structure without code duplication
People seem to like my explanation of RankNTypes, so I'll just link it. The other thing I would say is that the test strategy you've chosen, comparing the two different implementations, is able to prove the the implementations behave the same way, but not that they are correct. So you may give some thought to test cases designed to prove that an individual implementation is correct. The Quickcheck library is useful for this, so I'd recommend you read up on it.
Dec
17
revised How can non-determinism be modeled with a List monad?
Expand "LYAH" acronym to full book title, and link to website
Dec
14
comment Tagging functions in Haskell
Elliot's suggestion is an excellent demonstration of type algebra: the type Either a a is isomorphic to (a, Maybe ()). (Well, except for non-termination, as always...) In this case, TaggedFunction a b can be modeled as either Either (a -> b) (Either (a -> b) (a -> b)) (either Left f, Right (Left f) or Right (Right f)), or as (a -> b, Maybe (Maybe ())) (either (f, Nothing), (f, Just Nothing) or (f, Just (Just ()))).
Dec
14
revised An example of using Data.Map in Haskell
added 417 characters in body