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Jul
23
comment Haskell — Is there a monad sequence function for tuples?
I would say two things. First: this is strikes me as being simple and uncommon enough that there wouldn't be a library function for it; you can just do it online as Boyd suggests. Second: if such a function were to exist, you'd want to file it under Applicative, and it'd be something like (<,>) :: Applicative f -> f a -> f b -> f (a, b). This function is not a standard one, but you often find people talking about it because the associativity law that Applicative instances must obey is basically a <,> (b <,> c) == (a <,> b) <,> c (up to isomorphism).
Jul
23
answered haskell writing constructors that do work in them
Jul
8
comment A simple version of Haskell's map
@TomEllis I'd do that as mymap f = map f [1..5].
Jul
3
awarded  Enlightened
Jul
3
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jul
1
answered The Haskell RNG and state
Jun
26
answered Is it a bad idea to define some, but not all methods of a type class in Haskell?
Jun
25
revised How can I reduce the number of arguments I have to pass around in Haskell?
added 3 characters in body
Jun
25
revised How can I reduce the number of arguments I have to pass around in Haskell?
deleted 1 character in body
Jun
25
comment How can I reduce the number of arguments I have to pass around in Haskell?
@David I've expanded the answer. See if this helps. I'm afraid I've done everything in a bit of a hurry.
Jun
25
revised How can I reduce the number of arguments I have to pass around in Haskell?
added 3106 characters in body
Jun
24
answered How can I reduce the number of arguments I have to pass around in Haskell?
Jun
13
answered Is there a built-in for this?
Jun
5
comment How does forever monad work?
"Whenever something of type IO a is evaluated, it executes its internal actions and then returns something of type a wrapped in the IO context." No, that's just wrong. You're mixing up the concept of evaluating an expression of type IO a, which returns an action, with the concept of executing that action, which is external to the language.
May
29
comment Why can't a monad be decomposed?
There's a recent tutorial called "Inside My World (Ode to Functor and Monad)" that I feel does a very good job of explaining this.
May
27
comment Observing isomorphism and then proving them as Monad
+1 because this is the only answer so far to invoke inverses. I would add that the Applicative class proofs are perhaps more insightfully put by pointing out that (1) Maybe (Either f a) is the composition of Maybe and Either f, and that (2) the composition of two Applicatives is always an Applicative as well; so the isomorphism allows us to trivially implement an Applicative instance for Promise f a.
May
22
comment How do I use map over a list with do notation - ie avoid type `IO ()' with type `[IO ()]'?
For bonus points, a good exercise is to read the documentation for Control.Monad and figure out on one's own how to write each of these functions.
May
14
awarded  Pundit
May
14
comment Haskell $! operator and infinite lists
Note also that take n, for n > 0, has to force the list to WHNF anyway, so take 10 $! repeat 1 is operationally the same as take 10 $ repeat 1.