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Dec
10
comment Functionally solving questions: how to use Haskell?
Oh, I messed up, I misread the Data.List source code (actually, GHC.List). It is using a tail-recursive version. My apologies.
Dec
10
comment Functionally solving questions: how to use Haskell?
@jozefg I bet being strict on both lists makes a big difference—possibly what's happening is that anything that looks like fst . splitAt n gets inlined/optimized to just take n, which can then fuse very well with producers and consumers.
Dec
10
comment Functionally solving questions: how to use Haskell?
@jozefg Yes, but when it comes to explaining things to newcomers, you often have to battle the misconceptions (often from previous exposure to strict functional languages like ML or Scheme) that tail recursion will necessarily use constant space and non-tail recursion will necessarily use linear space. As you and I know, neither of these statements is generally true in Haskell. But I too often see newcomers bend themselves backwards to write a tail-recursive version of something that is best written as a foldr—one of my favorite examples is find.
Dec
10
comment Functionally solving questions: how to use Haskell?
I was curious what the Platform/GHC has, and it's the (take n l, drop n l) solution. Dunno exactly why, but it's worth mentioning that the Platform/GHC versions of take and drop have the list fusion optimization, so the point is that both elements of the tuple are "good producers" such that they can fuse into the same loop as their consumers. (Which is another reason why Haskell beginners should not be pushed into tail recursion—in Haskell, thanks to laziness and fusion optimizations, we often have "tail recursion bad, non-tail recursion good" situations...
Dec
10
answered Create HashTable in Haskell
Dec
10
awarded  Notable Question
Dec
9
answered How to implement “words” function
Dec
9
answered First attempt at Haskell: Converting lower case letters to upper case
Dec
9
comment Haskell - how to iterate list elements in reverse order in an elegant way?
To produce the first element of the list in this function, the fold must recurse the whole way down to the end of the list and force the second (boolean) element of each of the pairs. So I'm skeptical that this is any better than reversing the original list.
Dec
9
revised Haskell - how to iterate list elements in reverse order in an elegant way?
added 1314 characters in body
Dec
9
answered Haskell - how to iterate list elements in reverse order in an elegant way?
Dec
4
comment What do parentheses () used on their own mean?
@J.Abrahamson Possibly the key thing here is that imperative languages have strict semantics, so return undefined >>= f == f undefined == undefined. So a CIO Void action can never deliver a value to the function we bind it to. Note also that in Haskell implementations we need to pass thunks of type () around because of laziness—we don't know if a given thunk is () or bottom unless we force it. In a strict language, on the other hand, we only pass around things that we know aren't bottom, so () can be represented as no data at all.
Dec
4
revised What do parentheses () used on their own mean?
added 372 characters in body
Dec
4
answered What do parentheses () used on their own mean?
Dec
4
comment What do parentheses () used on their own mean?
@J.Abrahamson Oh, duh, I meant that as an analogy, and I said it as a statement. But basically there is some sort of isomorphism between the concepts of "the function returns with no result value" and "the function returns an empty record".
Dec
4
comment What do parentheses () used on their own mean?
One way to reconcile the imperative programming concept of void with Haskell's () is the following: void is the type of empty records, records with no fields. Since there are no fields, any two empty records are trivially equal, just by virtue of being empty. Since it has no fields, you can store an empty record as a block of 0 bytes. The only typesafe operations on an empty record are those that don't read any data from it—because there is no data to be read!
Dec
4
answered Is it possible to do the Free Monad in Clojure?
Dec
4
revised improvement to my code for Haskell monads
added 787 characters in body
Dec
4
revised improvement to my code for Haskell monads
added 787 characters in body
Dec
4
answered improvement to my code for Haskell monads