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Jul
8
comment A simple version of Haskell's map
@TomEllis I'd do that as mymap f = map f [1..5].
Jun
25
comment How can I reduce the number of arguments I have to pass around in Haskell?
@David I've expanded the answer. See if this helps. I'm afraid I've done everything in a bit of a hurry.
Jun
5
comment How does forever monad work?
"Whenever something of type IO a is evaluated, it executes its internal actions and then returns something of type a wrapped in the IO context." No, that's just wrong. You're mixing up the concept of evaluating an expression of type IO a, which returns an action, with the concept of executing that action, which is external to the language.
May
29
comment Why can't a monad be decomposed?
There's a recent tutorial called "Inside My World (Ode to Functor and Monad)" that I feel does a very good job of explaining this.
May
27
comment Observing isomorphism and then proving them as Monad
+1 because this is the only answer so far to invoke inverses. I would add that the Applicative class proofs are perhaps more insightfully put by pointing out that (1) Maybe (Either f a) is the composition of Maybe and Either f, and that (2) the composition of two Applicatives is always an Applicative as well; so the isomorphism allows us to trivially implement an Applicative instance for Promise f a.
May
22
comment How do I use map over a list with do notation - ie avoid type `IO ()' with type `[IO ()]'?
For bonus points, a good exercise is to read the documentation for Control.Monad and figure out on one's own how to write each of these functions.
May
14
comment Haskell $! operator and infinite lists
Note also that take n, for n > 0, has to force the list to WHNF anyway, so take 10 $! repeat 1 is operationally the same as take 10 $ repeat 1.
Apr
29
comment Difference between Monad and Applicative in Haskell
Note also that the Errors type in Control.Applicative.Lift implements precisely the "collect all errors" behavior described in this answer.
Apr
29
comment Difference between Monad and Applicative in Haskell
I think it's critical to note that when a type has a Monad instance defined, its Applicative instance must be compatible with that Monad instance (pure = return, (<*>) = ap`). While the second Applicative instance definition in this answer satisfies the Applicative laws, it violates this documented requirement. The proper way to get this second Applicative instance is to define it for some other type that's isomorphic to Either.
Mar
18
comment What is the difference between google's ImmutableList and Collections.unmodifiableList ()?
"As the documentation says, Google's code creates a copy." It might create a copy. If the original is also an immutable data structure, it might actually be able to reuse it. So if you use ImmutableList extensively, you'll hit this case very often and will end up not having to copy very much.
Mar
5
comment Iteratively printing every integer in a List
Note that the more idiomatic mapM_ f xs is in fact defined as sequence_ (map f xs) (see, e.g., the library source code). There's also forM_ xs f = mapM xs f.
Feb
27
comment What's the most efficient way to represent red-black trees?
One very simple idea might be to get rid of the Color type and use different constructors for red and black nodes. Another, more advanced idea is to use the type system (see also here‌​). This requires lots of GHC extensions, and I don't know how well the compiler optimizes these, but it's worth looking at—there's a chance that there's a way to optimize this type of implementation by recording the color only on some nodes of the tree, close to the top.
Feb
25
comment How to count the number of occurrences of a type passed to a function in haskell
I don't understand the intent of your code snippet—which, incidentally, seems to be ill-typed (the Push constructor appears without a parameter in the definition of step).
Feb
14
comment Map with multiple arguments an Trees
A better exercise is probably to implement the Functor, Foldable and Traversable instances by hand...
Feb
14
comment Why did the Haskell typesystem fail to catch this?
@user3309706: The only "wrongness" here is the discrepancy between the meaning of what you intended and what you wrote. The code you wrote is perfectly meaningful, which is why the compiler accepts it—it just doesn't mean what you expected. It's similar to, say, writing x - y in a context one should have written x + y; we don't normally expect compilers to catch that one, do we?
Feb
5
comment typeclass for repetitive actions until fixed point
Your relax operation, strictly speaking, doesn't "execut[e] an action until it stops having effects"—what it observes is the results of step, and not necessarily its effects. Are you making some assumption that equates effects and results? If so, you may want to clarify this.
Jan
30
comment “Data types à la carte” vs. nested FreeT transformers
I believe it corresponds to "Datatypes à la carte," but I'm not 100% certain. In any case, if I'm reading this right emkett said Extensible Effects ~= Datatypes à la carte + open unions.
Jan
28
comment “Data types à la carte” vs. nested FreeT transformers
This is, as I understand, an ongoing debate in the Haskell community. See, for example, Kiselyov, Sabry & Swords' "Extensible Effects: An Alternative to Monad Transformers" (PDF), and the resulting discussions in Lambda The Ultimate and /r/haskell in Reddit.
Jan
28
comment Combining Free types
@bheklilr: For the 3-or-more case, I recommend you read the "Data types à la carte" paper and see if you like their type class-based solution. On the other question, the fact that you need IO doesn't mean you can't use Applicative, since IO is an instance of that class too. Applicative doesn't prevent you from having IO—what it does is restrict how you combine the IO actions.
Jan
18
comment When are higher kinded types useful?
@lobsterism: There are algorithms/techniques that rely on being able to abstract out a Functor and let the client of the library pick it out. J. Abrahamson's answer provides one example: recursive folds can be generalized by using functors. Another example is free monads; you can think of these as a kind of generic interpreter implementation library, where the client supplies the "instruction set" as an arbitrary Functor.