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Dec
10
comment Functionally solving questions: how to use Haskell?
Oh, I messed up, I misread the Data.List source code (actually, GHC.List). It is using a tail-recursive version. My apologies.
Dec
10
comment Functionally solving questions: how to use Haskell?
@jozefg I bet being strict on both lists makes a big difference—possibly what's happening is that anything that looks like fst . splitAt n gets inlined/optimized to just take n, which can then fuse very well with producers and consumers.
Dec
10
comment Functionally solving questions: how to use Haskell?
@jozefg Yes, but when it comes to explaining things to newcomers, you often have to battle the misconceptions (often from previous exposure to strict functional languages like ML or Scheme) that tail recursion will necessarily use constant space and non-tail recursion will necessarily use linear space. As you and I know, neither of these statements is generally true in Haskell. But I too often see newcomers bend themselves backwards to write a tail-recursive version of something that is best written as a foldr—one of my favorite examples is find.
Dec
10
comment Functionally solving questions: how to use Haskell?
I was curious what the Platform/GHC has, and it's the (take n l, drop n l) solution. Dunno exactly why, but it's worth mentioning that the Platform/GHC versions of take and drop have the list fusion optimization, so the point is that both elements of the tuple are "good producers" such that they can fuse into the same loop as their consumers. (Which is another reason why Haskell beginners should not be pushed into tail recursion—in Haskell, thanks to laziness and fusion optimizations, we often have "tail recursion bad, non-tail recursion good" situations...
Dec
9
comment Haskell - how to iterate list elements in reverse order in an elegant way?
To produce the first element of the list in this function, the fold must recurse the whole way down to the end of the list and force the second (boolean) element of each of the pairs. So I'm skeptical that this is any better than reversing the original list.
Dec
4
comment What do parentheses () used on their own mean?
@J.Abrahamson Possibly the key thing here is that imperative languages have strict semantics, so return undefined >>= f == f undefined == undefined. So a CIO Void action can never deliver a value to the function we bind it to. Note also that in Haskell implementations we need to pass thunks of type () around because of laziness—we don't know if a given thunk is () or bottom unless we force it. In a strict language, on the other hand, we only pass around things that we know aren't bottom, so () can be represented as no data at all.
Dec
4
comment What do parentheses () used on their own mean?
@J.Abrahamson Oh, duh, I meant that as an analogy, and I said it as a statement. But basically there is some sort of isomorphism between the concepts of "the function returns with no result value" and "the function returns an empty record".
Dec
4
comment What do parentheses () used on their own mean?
One way to reconcile the imperative programming concept of void with Haskell's () is the following: void is the type of empty records, records with no fields. Since there are no fields, any two empty records are trivially equal, just by virtue of being empty. Since it has no fields, you can store an empty record as a block of 0 bytes. The only typesafe operations on an empty record are those that don't read any data from it—because there is no data to be read!
Oct
24
comment Benefit of importing specific parts of a Haskell module
I second this answer. Think of people who come later and try to read your code; if your module uses a function called frobnicate, how do they know which of the imported modules it came from? They can grep or Hoogle it, but maybe there are multiple modules that define functions of that name, which then they need to cross-reference with the imports, etc. It's nicer to just be more specific in your imports—though it's not a hard and fast rule either.
Sep
17
comment Java generics with 'semantics', is this possible?
I like this answer. It is the same idea as this technique in Haskell: using "extraneous" type variables in order to deny the compiler the knowledge that two type variables will be the same at the use site. There is a neat extra sneakiness factor with using K extends String when String is a final class...
Aug
5
comment Is it possible to change the monad type in a monadic sequence?
As J. Abrahamson's answer says, this is a natural transformation between two monads, also known as a monad morphism. There are a few packages to support this and similar notions; Tekmo has a blog post on his mmorph package that you could try reading. In general, however, I believe that a morphism between two monads may need to have some access to the "guts" of each monad to translate between them.
Jul
19
comment 'idiomatic' Haskell type inequality
I asked a potentially related question some months ago and got good answers.
Jul
2
comment What advantage does Monad give us over an Applicative?
This answer and tel's offer a very valuable flip side to the Monad vs. Applicative question: Monads can express flow control that Applicatives cannot, but on the flipside, Applicative can support powerful static analysis that is generally impossible for Monad. Capriotti & Kaposi's recent paper is my favorite on this topic, though I'll also mention my operational Applicative library; there's a parser optimization example on the README in the page.
Jun
3
comment What's the history behind the Functor type class?
"[H]aven't people been using generalized map functions since the early days of LISP?" Well, there is one difference, in that most of the time these "generalized map functions" are collection- or even sequence-based. Even today you see this in, e.g., Clojure, where the map function takes collections and returns lazy sequences. In contrast, the Functor class is based on equational laws, and makes no assumption about the implementation, leading to non-collection implementations like IO and FRP Behavior types.
May
30
comment How/can this type be made into a Monoid instance
This Applicative, incidentally, can be built up from Product, Constant, Identity and Sum: type Stuff a = Product (Constant (Sum Int)) Identity a.
May
25
comment how does 'undefined' work in Haskell
There's a problem with characterizing undefined as "the vacuously true statement," though, which is that it makes it sound like undefined corresponds to a tautological statement in logic, when nothing could be farther from the truth (ahem). In logical terms, allowing ourselves to have undefined :: forall a. a is fundamentally like saying that we have a proof for any statement a, no matter what a is—but logically speaking, this entails we can prove contradictions!
May
20
comment How is the calculation of types in Haskell
Unification is not a Haskell-specific concept, it's a more general term: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unification_(computer_science)
May
18
comment Correspondence between type classes and grammar levels in the Chomsky hierarchy
You should probably read this: byorgey.wordpress.com/2012/01/05/…
May
13
comment mdx specification?
I suspect the correct link is OLE DB for Online Analytical Processing (OLAP).
May
8
comment What is so special about Monads?
@TikhonJelvis: I don't see that "most of the more advanced Haskellers I know favor Applicatives to some degree." The things I see getting the most attention are not particularly applicative-related. As an example, to use something I've been working on, I judge that free monads still command more interest than free applicatives. Interest on free applicatives has been on the rise lately, though.