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Apr
15
comment What does “coalgebra” mean in the context of programming?
This is incredibly valuable. I'd managed to vague up some intuitions about this whole F-algebra business from reading and examples (e.g., from seeing their use with catamoprhisms), but this is just all crystal clear even to me. Thanks!
Apr
11
comment QuickCheck: Arbitrary instances of nested data structures that generate balanced specimens
The Quickcheck manual explains this and has helpful examples (though they may be for QuickCheck v1); see the sections titled "The size of test data" and "Generating recursive data types".
Apr
8
comment Implementing take using foldr
I should add that your sequence of evaluation steps is going from inner function applications to outer ones, which is the opposite order from what Haskell does. The outermost step is evaluated first, the one with 1 as its first argument. If step doesn't need its second argument, then computation ends there, before it looks at the rest of the list's elements. If step x _ = Just x, then foldr step Nothing [1,2,3,4] == step 1 (foldr step Nothing [2,3,4]) == Just 1.
Apr
8
comment Implementing take using foldr
"foldr will apply the function step starting from the last elements." This statement is, at best, very misleading in the face of lazy evaluation. Haskell in fact evaluates your second tree from left to right, and if the step function is not-strict on its second argument, it may abort computation early. The simplest example of this is safeHead = foldr (\x _ -> Just x) Nothing.
Apr
7
comment Lambda/ Anonymous function conceptual understanding
This example gets even better if we add dbl1', dbl2':: Double -> Double, with the same definitions...
Apr
7
comment Lambda/ Anonymous function conceptual understanding
Another criticism, another edit...
Apr
5
comment Lambda/ Anonymous function conceptual understanding
True. I was trying to simplify, but yeah, it's a bridge too far. I'll edit it.
Apr
3
comment Dissecting java Class file in haskell
@MathematicalOrchid: well, understanding Parsec should at least be a good starting point for moving on to something like attoparsec.
Apr
2
comment Haskell measuring function performance
Yeah, I was aware of the "extremely crude," but I still feel that it's likely to mislead. My example, I think, speaks for itself.
Apr
2
comment Haskell measuring function performance
I have to disagree with this suggestion; if the code is meant to run as a compiled program, how it performs in ghci can be profoundly misleading. My favorite example is that I've gotten cases where a program that works fine in ghci will produce a stack overflow when compiled, when applied to the same input.
Apr
1
comment Extending a list of list in Haskell
And if we really wanna play Haskell golf we could do [1..] >>= join replicate, using replicate as leftaroundabout suggests above and the join function from Control.Monad (in this case for the ((->) r) monad instance, with type (r -> r -> a) -> r -> a).
Mar
28
comment Why are difference lists not an instance of foldable?
Note that I said "taking repeated tails"; if you're just taking the tail once, the simple churchTail = fromList . tail . toList doesn't look too bad. But now consider what happens with churchTail . churchTail: you get a ChurchList backed by a []-list that's constructed from a ChurchList backed by a []-list. The heart of the problem is that a ChurchList and its churchTail don't share structure like a []-list and its tail do. I don't believe that more sophisticated implementations of churchTail that don't use toList/fromList can avoid this either.
Mar
21
comment Foldr issues (Haskell)
Functional programming tip: code that uses foldr like this is often difficult to read. foldr is best used to write "intermediate" utility functions that you then use to solve your concrete problems. For example, map, filter, (++), concat and many other standard list functions are all foldr under the hood.
Mar
20
comment Why add “Eq” type constraint without using “==”?
@nymk: Section 6.4 of the 2010 Report says "[t]he class Num of numeric types is a subclass of Eq, since all numbers may be compared for equality." But what's going on here is that recent versions of GHC don't do it: "The Num class no longer has Eq or Show superclasses. A number of other classes and functions have therefore gained explicit Eq or Show constraints, rather than relying on a Num constraint to provide them."
Mar
20
comment haskell - flip fix / fix
Excellent answer. I'd emphasize two things, however: (a) it's worth explicitly pointing out that the first equation for fact', fact' _ 0 = 1, doesn't use its first argument, which is how the fact' (fact' (...)) infinite stack is "exited" in this case; (b) while the fix f = f (fix f) definition is the easier one to understand, the more practical alternative is fix f = let r = f r in r, which is more performance-friendly; the easy one tends to compile to code that allocates a new thunk at each step, while the let version leads to circular reference graphs that reuse the same thunks.
Mar
1
comment Scrambled number conversion for numbers with 10 or more digits
Factoring side note: decToUnary should really be a pure Integer -> [String] function. You can then print the list with mapM_ putStrLn (decToUnary whatever).
Feb
25
comment Internal representation of Haskell lists?
Two big caveats: laziness and fusion. Laziness means that, for example, in xs ++ ys you only pay the cost of the append to the extent that you traverse the result list; head (xs ++ ys) is O(1), not O(n). Fusion means that many operations incur no extra cost over that of the traversal; for example, map (*2) (xs ++ ys) costs less than the sum of the costs of map (*2) and ++, because GHC eliminates the intermediate list produced.
Feb
23
comment Derive Eq and Show for type alias in Haskell
@MikeHartl: the problem is: what does equality mean? The strongest response is that x == y if and only if for all f, f x == f y. The problem with defining equality in terms of names is that even if you take care to never give the same name to two unequal functions, you still can't generally arrange for two equal functions to get the same name. The only way I can see to do it is if your functions are "compiled" from some recipe type that can be compared for equality, and the recipe -> function translation preserves recipe equality. (Which is an excellent technique, I should add.)
Feb
21
comment Why do all Haskell typeclasses have laws?
@ChrisTaylor: I'd rather say that the equivalence relation scenario entails people wrote something that is in fact a monad if it was written for a different type than the one in their implementation—one with less structure than the implementation type. In particular, luqui's example sounds like the good old Set monad so many of us wish we could have.
Feb
4
comment Why can't I compare tuples of arbitrary length in Haskell?
Nice answer, but I'm not sure we actually need either TypeOperators or DataKinds for this. Antal's point about strictness is also significant.