21,607 reputation
41539
bio website numericalrecipes.wordpress.co…
location San Diego, CA
age 41
visits member for 4 years, 11 months
seen 8 hours ago

A mechanical engineer by education, I'm currently working for HP's Large Format Printing Specialty Printing Systems Division in Barcelona, Spain, San Diego, CA, dealing mostly with printing algorithms.


Apr
11
comment Python: Differences between lists and numpy array of objects
@NPE I mostly agree, other than as a convenient way to do (some) mathematical operations with arrays of Fraction objects (or the like), without resorting to half a dozen nested zip's and map's.
Apr
11
answered How to return an array of at least 4D: efficient method to simulate numpy.atleast_4d
Apr
11
comment How to link instance attributes to a numpy array?
@HenriV Oops! Had to change those two myself to make the code work, forgot to paste the corrected code in here.
Apr
11
revised How to link instance attributes to a numpy array?
deleted 3 characters in body
Apr
10
comment Numpy max slow when applied to list of arrays
Can you hint us what processing you are doing?
Apr
10
comment Increment given indices in a matrix
+1 Very nice. np.ravel_multi_index may come in handy to avoid having to think too much with more complicated arrays.
Apr
10
answered How to link instance attributes to a numpy array?
Apr
10
answered Basic Python programming help needed: Arrays and random locations
Apr
10
comment How, when and what to vectorize in python?
I don't think too many people are going to actually read your 100+ lines of code, I know I am not. I'd suggest you isolate the source of your worries, whether it is the working of atof or the bottleneck in your Python code (after profiling it), then prepare a short, self contained example that illustrates your problem and ask for help here. You will get much more feedback, plus you'll often find that preparing a good question often leads to answering it on your own. Good luck!
Apr
9
answered numpy more efficient submatrix
Apr
9
comment numpy more efficient submatrix
It will work, unless there's rounding errors, will post as an answer...
Apr
9
comment numpy more efficient submatrix
It is very prone to rounding errors, but you could try to compute the adjugate of your matrix (what you divide by the determinant to get the inverse) as np.linalg.inv(A) * np.linalg.det(A), which will make your code run a zillion times faster. What size matrices are you dealing with?
Apr
9
comment Unexpected behavior for numpy self division
This is not a numpy problem, it is a passing objects by reference problem. The default implementation of all __i*__ is to do the operation in place if possible, read the docs. You will have the same problem passing a Python list to a function that did def f(a): a *= 3; return a, it would modify the original object you called it with, not simply return a modified copy.
Apr
9
comment numpy more efficient submatrix
In general no, you can't take a view of the submatrix. What are you doing with the submatrix afterwards?
Apr
9
comment numpy more efficient submatrix
As @Bitwise points out in his answer, not much speed up to be gained in moving memory around. You could do at least 25% less shuffling of data by doing the operation in place, is that an option? Also, what do you need this submatrix for? It may be easier to modify the code using the submatrices to ignore the corresponding row and column than to actually remove them.
Apr
9
comment numpy more efficient submatrix
Not that I know of...
Apr
9
comment numpy more efficient submatrix
That will create an intermediate array without the i-th row, then remove its j-th column, so it will probably be twice as slow.
Apr
9
comment “shape mismatch” error using numpy in python
What versions of python and numpy are you running? Your code as posted above only has a misindentation in the i = i +1...
Apr
9
comment Eliminate for loops in numpy implementation
I was in doubt, so I just timed it: there is no relevant difference performance wise between having two smaller nested for loops, or a larger one over their Cartesian product. It does look cleaner, which is a good thing, but equally fast (or slow).
Apr
9
comment Eliminate for loops in numpy implementation
@FrancescoMontesano I can't think of any reason why it wouldn't. The aligned_W array is a (probably repeating) copy of the data of W for the corresponding indices, but there is no constraint for all of the data having to be fetched by the fancy indexing that I know of.