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Apr
17
comment Loading a non-relocatable, static ELF binary in userspace
Thanks, what I did was modify the loader's linker script to relocate itself out of the way at compile-time with -Ttext-segment=0x8000000 (for instance), then I was able to successfully load my binary where it belongs inside the loader's address space. Cheers! And no making the original binary relocatable is not an option in my case.
Apr
17
asked Loading a non-relocatable, static ELF binary in userspace
Apr
11
comment Why is it better to use pointers in a linked list?
@k_g Well, the C/C++ standard mandates that the return value of sizeof is an unsigned integral type, so there goes the hope of transfinite or even real sizes. (being even more pedantic! :p)
Apr
11
comment Why is it better to use pointers in a linked list?
@mckenzm This kind of "bucketed" linked list design is still quite common, an advantage is that keeping track of the "empties" can be done very efficiently with the right CPU instruction (keep them in a bitmap and use first-bit-set-like instructions)
Mar
21
comment Python - Remove Last Line From String
This doesn't work if there is only one line, it will delete the last character instead (whereas it should probably return the empty string). Should check if the rfind returns -1 and act accordingly.
Feb
9
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
23
comment How do I push amended commit to the remote git repo?
If you've successfully pulled back the commit in your last example, why do you need to force push? Wouldn't a standard push suffice? Thanks
Dec
29
comment What is the endianness of binary literals in C++14?
@jamesdlin Integers don't have endianness. Their memory representation does... but the point is that you need to parse the byte array correctly to obtain the same integer representations from the bytes on systems with different endianness. And, yes, I certainly agree that taking advantage of endianness is usually an optimization, but in many cases it is such a low-level operation that it is done so frequently it would be a complete waste of time not to exploit your knowledge of the system's endianness (be it at compile-time or runtime). This happens all the time in crypto implementations.
Dec
29
comment What is the endianness of binary literals in C++14?
@jamesdlin Read my comment again: the program is simply passed a byte array (which has no endianness: it's a well-defined sequence of bytes) and needs to convert it into an array of 64-bit little-endian integers (perhaps to do operations on them, so that machines with different endianness produce the same result given the same byte array). You can do this task the slow, inefficient (but portable) way, by reading the bytes in one by one and building the 64-bit integers as you go, or you can do it the fast way, by blitting the 8-byte block into a 64-bit integer and byte-swapping if big endian.
Dec
29
comment What is the endianness of binary literals in C++14?
@jamesdlin How about when you read a raw byte array and need to parse them into an array of little-endian 64-bit integers because that's what the specification requires?
Dec
19
comment What is the endianness of binary literals in C++14?
@Medinoc As far as I've seen it done endianness is rarely checked at runtime anyway, it's usually assumed to be one or the other at build time by deducing it from the target architecture, and even then the OS tends to do the work for you in most cases (e.g. linux/bsd and their endian.h headers, OS X also has an analogous header, windows doesn't but windows is always little endian anyway)
Dec
19
comment What is the endianness of binary literals in C++14?
I would like to point out that at a sufficiently low level of programming you cannot avoid endianness because the specifications of whatever you are implementing mandate their inputs or outputs to be in little/big/whatever endian. That includes network protocols, cryptographic algorithms, and so on. Just because you don't do these things doesn't mean they don't exist, and endianness does leak out of the nice comfy type system in these situations. So the "too clever for your own good" part seems unwarranted.
Dec
16
awarded  Yearling
Dec
14
comment How do I correctly clean up a Python object?
@Collin You can escape them. E.g. using slashes before each gives __ :)
Dec
13
comment How can I correctly handle malloc failure in C, especially when there is more than one malloc?
In one of our C projects we simply wrote a couple macros to help emulate a special-purpose form of RAII. It works really well (one point of resource acquisition, one point of resource destruction, no code duplication, and it works with stuff other than memory as well) as long as we use the macros correctly.
Dec
12
comment Can I checkout github wikis like a git repository?
"closed as off-topic". rolls eyes
Nov
14
comment Implementing IDisposable correctly
+1, having a flag to make sure the cleanup code is executed only once is way, way better than setting properties to null or whatever (especially since that interferes with readonly semantics)
Nov
14
comment Implementing IDisposable correctly
@DanielMann The semantics of a using block do tend to be appealing beyond the IDisposable interface alone, though. I imagine there have been more than a few abuses of IDisposable just for scoping purposes.
Nov
14
comment Signed vs. unsigned integers for lengths/counts
On the other hand, while(size-- > 0) is a reliable idiom (though mostly in C/C++, not so much C# since so much emphasis is put on using signed types everywhere that using unsigned types is more trouble than it is worth as you need to cast essentially all the time). Signed types won't salvage bad code, it will just hide logic errors :)
Nov
13
accepted Generic PInvoke in C#