Anders Sjöqvist

less info
1,278 reputation
1615
bio website f.kth.se/~ante
location Sweden
age 33
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen Apr 16 at 9:24

Educations in Business and Computer Science. Currently working with development at a startup in Beijing, China.


Jun
15
revised How do REST URIs work internally?
Detailed answer to follow-up question
Jun
14
awarded  Necromancer
Jun
14
revised RESTful web services with complex actions (verbs)
Added alternative solution, and a reminder to use POST when the request alters anything
Jun
13
comment How do REST URIs work internally?
I don't think this deserves downvoting. Sure, the question is vague, but it's not because of a lack of information in the question. The questioner is simply confused by the RESTful mindset and asked to have it clarified. It seems that he already did a fair amount of research before asking, without completely understanding what a RESTful API is meant to represent.
Jun
13
answered How do REST URIs work internally?
Jun
12
asked Different REST resource content based on user viewing privileges
Jun
7
accepted Simultaneous redirect to App Store and another page
Jun
7
comment Simultaneous redirect to App Store and another page
Although this is not the answer I was hoping for, I fear that you're right, and I ended up following your suggestion. Thanks!
Jun
7
asked DB choice for efficient user access permission lookups
May
31
answered Regular expression - finding specific string with at least one capital letter
May
31
comment Regular expression - finding specific string with at least one capital letter
Also, could you please give an example of a string that /^"fu:.*?[A-Z].*?"$/ could match, but /^"fu:.*[A-Z].*"$/ couldn't? Thanks!
May
31
comment Regular expression - finding specific string with at least one capital letter
The problem with this is that it only matches capital letters in the range A through Z. For example, the Ruby code ['"fu:Berlin"', '"fu:İstanbul"', '"fu:Washington"', '"fu:Örebro"', '"fu:Москва"'].map {|s| s.scan /^"fu:.*?[A-Z].*?"$/} returns [["\"fu:Berlin\""], [], ["\"fu:Washington\""], [], []], although all of the strings theoretically contain capital letters.
May
30
revised How to make a Ruby string safe for a filesystem?
Removed unnecessary case independence in regex
May
30
answered How to make a Ruby string safe for a filesystem?
May
29
revised RESTful web services with complex actions (verbs)
Added comment about a trailing slash in the question, which I forgot to mention
May
27
awarded  Tumbleweed
May
22
comment RESTful web services with complex actions (verbs)
@user1236971 Oh, and by the way, I'm not sure what you mean with abstracting the models so that they don't deal with authentication. Where are you planning to do that? I would try to implement the model so that a mistake in the view or controller would never be able to corrupt data, and that probably involves doing some permissions checking. But like I said, session management is tricky, and I don't know the best practices. I'm having problems with the same things.
May
22
comment RESTful web services with complex actions (verbs)
@user1236971 I'm not an expert, but here's how I see it: Developing the model separately sounds a bit like contradiction in terms. Your model should offer the data in a structured way, hiding as much of the underlying implementation as possible. It should also handle some basic security and hide things that shouldn't be exposed. For example, you should be able to alter or verify a password, but never retrieve it (even as a hash). This is more or less exactly what the API should do, and you shouldn't duplicate your code. Your model is your API, although you might skip the JSON conversion.
May
21
awarded  Critic
May
20
comment C++ speed differences of “by value” vs “by reference”
@cf16 Also, don't think of my answers as an explanation for the difference in execution time in this particular situation. The allocation and initialization of new objects is certainly the cause here, and I personally use const references all the time. I'm just saying that in order to make a fair comparison, you should make sure that the different methods are actually doing exactly the same thing. You can often control the optimization level in the compiler, but comparing efficiency in non-optimized code might not be what you're looking to do either, since you'll only ship optimized code...