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Carve, smooth, chisel:

Let your floating dream;

Be sealed;

In the resisting block!

L’Art, Theophile Gautier


1h
awarded  Enlightened
10h
comment Output unicode wchar_t character
Being downvoted (thanks downvoter!) for this answer is a little bit harsh as the program above works well and the issue sounds related to MinGW.
10h
comment Output unicode wchar_t character
@cdonts on Linux and on Cygwin without the call to setlocale the character will not be correctly printed. MinGW might be a little different.
10h
comment Output unicode wchar_t character
@cdonts It works fine on Linux by adding the setlocale call, I could n't test it on MinGW but I suppose setlocale call may have to be changed.
10h
comment Output unicode wchar_t character
@cdonts probably because on Windows swprintf for whatever reason does not expect the size as the second argument
10h
answered Output unicode wchar_t character
10h
comment Output unicode wchar_t character
swprintf has a size as the second parameter. You also have to include wchar.h standard header.
11h
comment memory allocation in C while using pointers
@user3437973 mutability is a CS concept, not something special to Java
11h
comment memory allocation in C while using pointers
@DavidFrye char * is mutable, you certainly meant a string literal is immutable.
11h
comment memory allocation in C while using pointers
Your program does not compile. Please check first that your program compiles.
12h
comment What does the c precompiler do with macros defined as (void)0
@gmch yes, it would work. (Note that you also need to cast the second operand of ?: operator: (1 ? (void) printf(__VA_ARGS__) : (void) 0))
14h
comment What does the c precompiler do with macros defined as (void)0
@DrewMcGowen see my answer in OP question, void expression can be used as operands of comma expression or conditional expression.
15h
comment What does the c precompiler do with macros defined as (void)0
It is a great advantage but note that it also changes the semantic, PRINTF is no longer a substitution for expression but now is a statement (so can no longer be used where an expression can be used).
15h
comment What does the c precompiler do with macros defined as (void)0
@ThoAppelsin see my answer for why (void) 0 is better
15h
answered What does the c precompiler do with macros defined as (void)0
17h
comment Why is it better to use cast when you assign an integer to a pointer?
The two types may have different sizes, OK, but how using a cast will make a difference in the assignment bevahior? (It was OP actual question.)
17h
comment Why is it better to use cast when you assign an integer to a pointer?
@MatteoItalia yes 6.3.2.3p5 is used for the cast of an integer value to a pointer type.
17h
comment Advantages in using an enum to define a single value? (C)
It should be noted that in the Standard all named constants are created using macros (and for some of them it is mandatory as they have types different than int). true and false int values from stdbool.h are explicitly macros and I think the reason is to allow the programmer to redefine them (using #undef).
17h
comment Why is it better to use cast when you assign an integer to a pointer?
@MatteoItalia IIRC in C implicit conversion from int to pointer is allowed It is not allowed, constraints of the assignment operator are violated (see 6.5.16.1p1 in c11).
18h
comment Why is it better to use cast when you assign an integer to a pointer?
@barakmanos "two types are not necessarily the same size on every platform" I don't think it is the rationale for the assignment constraint in the Standard. Look, you can assign any integer type of different size to any integer type of another size (for example from unsigned long long to unsigned char). In this case, one type is an integer type and the other type is a pointer type. C probably forbids the assignments because C is a typed language and typed languages tend to limit the number of implicit conversions.