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seen Mar 16 '13 at 15:20

Mar
16
answered Chrome Prints CSS Sprites with a vertical stretch
Jan
7
revised Can clang be told not to analyze certain files?
Tested idea and provide mini proof of concept implementation
Jan
7
answered Can clang be told not to analyze certain files?
Dec
25
comment Google Kix editor - how to send data using POST?
Indeed, even the README from benjamn's github project states "Although they have not released the source code for this editor, nor have they stated any intention of doing so ...". I would presume this code is fully closed source and not use it in any project.
Dec
25
comment pthreads: how to assert code is run in a single threaded context
Reading "/proc" isn't ideal, but I agree that the only way to count threads is OS specific so this type of solution is close to the best we can get. Thanks @Nominal Animal.
Dec
25
accepted pthreads: how to assert code is run in a single threaded context
Dec
21
comment pthreads: how to assert code is run in a single threaded context
thanks. I think we are on the same page now.
Dec
21
comment pthreads: how to assert code is run in a single threaded context
say thread t1 happens to be inside a call to malloc (and holding an internal lock) at the instance the fork occurs. In the new process space that internal malloc lock will be held but never released. Therefore the first time I call malloc from the new process I will deadlock. See the "threads and fork don't mix" article linked in the initial question for more complete background. Did I not understand something about your solution that mitigates this case?
Dec
21
comment pthreads: how to assert code is run in a single threaded context
@ydroneaud, thanks for pointing out this isn't actually POSIX. I therefore removed the answer flag. It is a very creative solution though.
Dec
21
comment pthreads: how to assert code is run in a single threaded context
I apologize if I am missing your point. Say the user spawns thread t1 and t2. In thread t1, the user will never interact with my library code at all but they will utilize other libc functions. In thread t2, they initialize my library (where I use your pthread_once trick). In this case, deadlock of the forked child can occur, however (unless I'm missing something) the pthread_once() trick you mention will not be able to detect thread t1.
Dec
21
awarded  Scholar
Dec
21
comment pthreads: how to assert code is run in a single threaded context
Thanks Arun. This solution is the best answer to the original question (using only pthreads how to ensure ensure single threaded execution context) so I'm marking it as the answer. In practice, I think I am going to end up launching my worker binaries in another way (per some of the other comments).
Dec
21
comment pthreads: how to assert code is run in a single threaded context
ydroneaud, Thanks - this is an interesting idea. However, as best I can tell, this does not ensure that the application code did not already spawn a different thread (that will never enter my library code but still could cause mutex deadlock) before initializing the library.
Dec
21
comment pthreads: how to assert code is run in a single threaded context
Alexis Wilke, yes, but it is possible for the first created process (during the library initialization code) to in turn launch other worker processes where the actual work is done. So long as the launcher process stays running, it can restart crashed workers to make the process crash not be terminal from the application code perspective.
Dec
21
comment pthreads: how to assert code is run in a single threaded context
jim mcnamara, thanks for the suggestion. I'll very likely do something along the lines of a daemon. Still, I'm interested if anyone has a creative solution for this problem at a pthreads level.
Dec
21
awarded  Commentator
Dec
20
revised pthreads: how to assert code is run in a single threaded context
clarify reason for using multiple processes
Dec
20
comment pthreads: how to assert code is run in a single threaded context
The point is well taken though nos and evil otto. I could launch my other processes via another mechanism than fork() -- that just might make setting up/using the library a bit more burdensome on the end-user. Still, I think the functionality (of checking for a single-threaded execution context) is generally useful.
Dec
20
comment pthreads: how to assert code is run in a single threaded context
nos, True -- I didn't justify the reason for using a separate process. However, lots of valid possible reasons exist and (especially for the case of a library) ensuring a single-threaded environment seems like something that is generally useful. In my case the forked process is relatively heavy weight (using webkit w/ IPC) and I want the original process to be able to survive in the event the forked process (or one of it's workers) crashes.
Dec
20
comment pthreads: how to assert code is run in a single threaded context
evil otto, in my forked process I am using libc functions which could get deadlocked waiting on internal libc locks (eg: malloc, stdio functions, etc). Also it is possible that my library is linked with a custom allocator (eg: tcmalloc) which performs internal locking. If the fork() does not occur prior to threads being created in the original process it is very difficult to write code that (safely) does more than calling execve.