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Mar
6
comment C++11/14: How to remove a pointer-to-member from a type?
@Potatoswatter: PTMFs seem to work fine: struct C { void f() {}; }; void (C::*p)() = &C::f; using T = remove_member_pointer_t<decltype(p)>; static_assert(is_same<T, void()>::value, "error");. What did you forsee was the problem with them?
Mar
6
comment C++11/14: How to remove a pointer-to-member from a type?
@Potatoswatter: My need comes from Reflection. Good question about PTMFs, need to look at that.
Mar
6
comment C++11/14: How to remove a pointer-to-member from a type?
@Potatoswatter: std::remove_member_pointer doesn't exist in type traits right? Perhaps it should.
Mar
6
revised C++11/14: How to remove a pointer-to-member from a type?
added 1160 characters in body
Mar
6
revised C++11/14: How to remove a pointer-to-member from a type?
added 491 characters in body
Mar
6
asked C++11/14: How to remove a pointer-to-member from a type?
Mar
6
comment Compile-time reflection in C++17?
@NoSenseEtAI: I don't completely understand what you mean - but using the primitives someone will be able to write-once a serialization library that can take a value of an arbitrary type T and encode it to a bit string in some format and visa versa. This can be achieved by enumerating the subobjects recursively, and taking appropriate action based on their type, name and a pointer-to-member.
Mar
5
comment Compile-time reflection in C++17?
@NoSenseEtAl: Yes. If you look at the example code in N3815 you can see how to get from the given traits to a for loop over the enumerators of an enumeration type. I am currently working on similar traits for class members so you will be able to loop over class members. Of course, class members have heterogeneous types so the "loop" will be like looping over the elements of a std::tuple - it can't be a for loop as such - but you will be able to get the same effect of doing something for each class member.
Mar
5
revised Compile-time reflection in C++17?
added 59 characters in body
Mar
5
comment Compile-time reflection in C++17?
@Vincent: Yes, creating a new entity with a name that is a compile-time string, and not an identifier token, I consider part of reification. I think we will be able to read an identifier (like in N3815) before we can write one.
Mar
5
revised Compile-time reflection in C++17?
added 482 characters in body
Mar
5
answered Compile-time reflection in C++17?
Mar
4
revised Fibonacci series in C++ can't get more than 47 numbers
edited title
Mar
4
comment What's the difference between recursion, memoization & dynamic programming?
@user13107: It memoizes the answers in a cache so if two calls are made f(3) and then later f(3) again, only the first does the computation, the second call gets the cached result from the first. This is generally considered a form of DP.
Mar
4
comment Define a templated T as pointer
ubyte* const and ubyte (* const) are equivalent, the parenthesis are redundant: See ideone.com/iCeYcz Yes, C++ declarator precedence takes some time to learn. Search for the "spiral rule".
Mar
4
comment Define a templated T as pointer
@mr5 like const ptr<const ubyte>
Mar
4
comment Define a templated T as pointer
T*, const T*, T* const and const T* const are all valid and distinct types. const const T* is not valid.
Mar
4
comment Define a templated T as pointer
That isn't valid. You mean const T* const pT.
Mar
4
comment Define a templated T as pointer
const (ubyte *) is not a valid type-id. You mean ubyte* const.
Mar
4
comment Do I need to make multiple executables for targetting different instruction sets?
You could write two functions within the same exe, one the uses AES instructions, another that does AES in software, and then select between them at run-time based on output from CPUID.