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Jul
9
revised How to compute `ulp`when `Math.ulp` is missing?
Fixed the last line to produce the correct result; you can't directly cast from long to double and get the correct value.
Jul
8
comment How to compute `ulp`when `Math.ulp` is missing?
Here's more information on it: randomascii.wordpress.com/2012/01/23/stupid-float-tricks-2
Jul
8
comment How to compute `ulp`when `Math.ulp` is missing?
@Axel It shouldn't; while technically a floating point standard could exist where this isn't true, for IEEE 754 and variants, adjacent floating point numbers are also adjacent integers. So calculating an adjacent integer and converting back to floating point, will give you the next representable number. The difference between the two numbers is the ULP.
Jul
8
comment How to compute `ulp`when `Math.ulp` is missing?
@Axel Sorry, your example or mine? I'm not clear on which one you mean.
Jul
8
answered How to compute `ulp`when `Math.ulp` is missing?
Jun
10
comment Is there a type of collection or associative-array where the key is also and/or part of the value?
@quantdev Absolutely; storing a reference obviously avoids copying the referenced data at the cost of a dereference on access. The real issue though is that an Axis3 represents an atomic value (in the sense that it can't be further reduced, not threading wise) as far as the map is concerned, and really shouldn't be passed around by reference except internally such as within a collection.
Jun
10
comment Is there a type of collection or associative-array where the key is also and/or part of the value?
@quantdev No, the struct could just as easily be a class. Axis3 generally belongs to an object though or exists in relation to an object, and being as small as it is, it makes more sense structurally (no pun intended) to be a struct. It also simplifies (and reduces the chance of bugs) the accessors for the position of objects, as you don't need to explicitly copy the Axis3 when it's a struct. Even objects at the same position shouldn't share the same reference, due to the likelihood of them moving.
Jun
10
asked Is there a type of collection or associative-array where the key is also and/or part of the value?
Jul
3
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
17
comment Compiling libnoise on windows with mingw
I don't know if you ever solved this issue, but if you haven't, user Lukas put together a CMake setup that makes building libnoise very easy. You can find it linked in his answer, to this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/15272971/…
Jun
17
comment Netbeans C++ using MinGW and the libnoise library
A hearty thanks for starting this project; without a working CMake or make file, I would have simply abandoned the library and went on to use something else or just implement the very basics myself.
Mar
23
comment Can the new Clang Objective-C literals be redirected to custom classes?
This is quite a bit of a hack, but I think it's the closest anyone can get without directly modifying the compiler.
Mar
23
accepted Can the new Clang Objective-C literals be redirected to custom classes?
Jan
5
awarded  Yearling
Dec
30
awarded  Nice Question
Dec
27
accepted Does class_getInstanceSize have a known bug about returning incorrect sizes?
Dec
25
answered is it possible to run TDM64-GCC compiler to run with code::blocks
Dec
24
answered Does class_getInstanceSize have a known bug about returning incorrect sizes?
Dec
24
comment Does class_getInstanceSize have a known bug about returning incorrect sizes?
@KurtRevis I should mention that I've further tested another new project (command-line only; 10.8.2 Intel Mac) that seems to act much more like you'd expect; NSObject is 8 bytes; an empty subclass is 16 bytes, and the instance size seems to increase in 16 byte chunks, most likely for memory alignment purposes. At this point I'm entirely stumped; from a default Cocoa project, I've distilled this issue down to a simple class that inherits from NSObject and the call class_getInstanceSize([MyClassName class]); and it still exhibits the same behavior.
Dec
24
comment Does class_getInstanceSize have a known bug about returning incorrect sizes?
@KurtRevis The exact code is - (size_t)getInstanceSize:(Class)aClass { return class_getInstanceSize(aClass); }. I've encapsulated the function in a method for testing purposes (such as printing results), but that's all there is to it. Feed it any class aside from NSObject, obtained in any way you please and you get the results described above.