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visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen Nov 26 '13 at 20:51

Apr
30
comment return iterator from std::set::insert() is const?
Duh. I should have thought of this. Thanks. In my real example, it wasn't an int, is was a more complex object that I wanted to change some state on.
Apr
18
comment const_cast a const member in a class constructor
Praetorian: The vector shouldn't be modified after the qqq is created until the qqq is destroyed. The const enforces that.
Apr
18
comment const_cast a const member in a class constructor
Konrad: you could pretend the arg is a reference instead. doesn't affect my question.
May
1
comment Haskell: getting the static type of an expression
The use is for self-documenting code and logging. It's too bad it's not possible, it seems like it would be trivial to implement as a "magic function" in the compiler, which already has all the info.
May
1
comment Haskell: getting the static type of an expression
Well it's a start but it doesn't seem to work with polymorphic types, and, like you said, it only works with the Data.Typeable class. I was hoping for a function that works exactly like :type in GHCi.
Apr
29
comment Why doesn't this Haskell typeclass code work?
Ah that makes sense. My mistake was in thinking that the function signature was doing something like an interface cast in other languages.
Apr
23
comment rvalue refs and std::move
Thanks for that detailed answer. Clearly there's a lot of subtlety here to be understood.
Jan
13
comment How to enforce use of template specialization?
That works. I also thought of another solutions that works: referencing a non-existant member, so the base function becomes: template<class Foo> void func(Foo x) { x.You_must_call_a_specialization_of_this_function; }
Jan
13
comment How to enforce use of template specialization?
I thought of another way that works. Just reference a non-existant class member is the base function.