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Aug
12
comment writing files to Common Application Data folder denied
I suppose you could take the sledgehammer approach: create your own directory during installation, and configure its ACL to allow write access for normal users.
Aug
11
comment writing files to Common Application Data folder denied
@Rev1.0: It's a security hole. If a limited user could write to a location outside his/her user area, then the potential exists for malicious code to trash your machine without first acquiring admin privileges. If you want to store data common to all users, you have two choices: 1. If the data is written once during installation, then write it during installation when you do have admin rights. 2. If the data must be updatable after installation, then put it in the database.
Aug
11
comment writing files to Common Application Data folder denied
@Rev1.0: You can't. It's a basic principle of Windows security that, if you are a limited user, you are only allowed to store data against yourself.
Jul
30
awarded  Good Answer
Jul
27
awarded  Good Answer
Jun
3
comment SqlCommand() ExecuteNonQuery() truncates command text
@MStodd: I see. However, that will only be an issue if the connection is reset between commands. If you keep it open, as you would with my code above or with SSIS, then it should work fine.
Jun
2
comment SqlCommand() ExecuteNonQuery() truncates command text
@MStodd: SET IDENTITY_INSERT stays set until you turn it off, you only have to set it once. What problem are you having with your script exactly?
Jun
1
awarded  Yearling
Jun
1
comment SqlCommand() ExecuteNonQuery() truncates command text
@MStodd: SET IDENTITY_INSERT is intended for use in data import scripts, so it is a good solution. Personally, though, I would use SSIS to import data.
May
7
awarded  Enlightened
May
7
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
24
comment WITH CHECK ADD CONSTRAINT followed by CHECK CONSTRAINT vs. ADD CONSTRAINT
@HenrikStaunPoulsen: I don't know, it's always worked fine for me. I run a query like select * from sys.objects where [type] in ('C', 'F') and (objectproperty([object_id], 'CnstIsDisabled') = 1 or objectproperty([object_id], 'CnstIsNotTrusted') = 1) to find disabled and untrusted constraints. After issuing the appropriate alter table statements as above, those constraints do disappear from the query, so I can see it working.
Apr
24
comment WITH CHECK ADD CONSTRAINT followed by CHECK CONSTRAINT vs. ADD CONSTRAINT
@HenrikStaunPoulsen: Yes that's the link. There is nothing stopping you enabling each constraint individually, but you do have to say WITH CHECK CHECK CONSTRAINT to get them trusted.
Apr
18
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
31
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
19
awarded  Enlightened
Mar
19
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
12
revised POST sending no values
added 369 characters in body
Mar
12
answered POST sending no values