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Nov
16
comment Converting to Jython a Python 3.5 project - UnicodeDecodeError: 'unicodeescape' codec can't decode bytes in position 4-10: illegal Unicode character
When you say you went from CPython 3.5 to Jython 2.7 "because some java API's are going to be added"... what do you really mean? I'd advocate not using Jython at all and just creating API as an RPC interface from your process that people wanting to use any language could call them.
Nov
2
awarded  Custodian
Nov
2
reviewed Reviewed Debugging assembly code created with yasm
Nov
2
comment Debugging assembly code created with yasm
ddd is just a GUI frontend to gdb.
May
16
comment How exactly do the hashlib hashers treat input?
Multi-dimensional arrays from numpy may "work" but whether it counts as "fine" or not really depends on the guarantees your application and libraries like numpy are making about the exact memory layout of the data it presents via the buffer interface. Will it always be the same? Ordered by rows or by columns? What format are the bytes of an array of larger values stored in? etc... Ensure these are always the same before you hash a something other than an obvious linear sequence of bytes.
Feb
24
comment Convert unique numbers to md5 hash using pandas
Do not hash social security numbers and think that it provides any sort of obfuscation. The social security number space is tiny, unsalted hashes of those are trivial for anyone to reverse. If you care about the privacy of the personal information you are hashing you should at the very least use the hmac module rather than just a straight up hash.
Nov
7
answered hashlib.pbkdf2_hmac not found on AWS CentOS instance
Jul
3
comment Python program hangs forever when called from subprocess
gc.set_check_interval I believe. But given your updates I do not think you need to try fiddling with that anymore.
Jul
2
comment Python program hangs forever when called from subprocess
This type of behavior with seeming random innocuous changes "altering" behavior smells of a timing issue, possibly related to when GC collections are performed. What happens if you alter the GC check interval? From a slow 1 up to a high value and even disabled. Can you point me at the subprocess.POpen call in pip?
Apr
17
comment Is there a faster way (than this) to calculate the hash of a file (using hashlib) in Python?
My point is that the hash function "block_size" attribute is meaningless and shouldn't even be used for any purpose. Just pick an IO buffer size, don't attempt to base it off of block_size.
Apr
4
revised What are preferred cryptographic hashing functions in Python (preferably provided in hashlib)?
typo fixes.
Apr
4
comment Is there a faster way (than this) to calculate the hash of a file (using hashlib) in Python?
My point was that the block_size attribute of the hash functions is entirely useless. You should not write code that uses it. Modifying it will do nothing. The only thing that matters is modifying an I/O buffer size. That has nothing to do with the hash functions internal block size.
Apr
4
suggested approved edit on What are preferred cryptographic hashing functions in Python (preferably provided in hashlib)?
Mar
30
comment Is there a faster way (than this) to calculate the hash of a file (using hashlib) in Python?
There is no point in using hashfunc.block_size at all, it's a meaningless value that only exists as part of the APIs for legacy reasons. Just loop reading whatever size is efficient to read from disk for the purposes of your code and pass it to the hash function. As long as you read more than ~64KiB at a time you are unlikely to notice any measurable difference.
Jan
22
awarded  Yearling
Jan
14
awarded  Excavator
Jan
14
revised Showing the stack trace from a running Python application
mention the backport
Jan
14
comment Showing the stack trace from a running Python application
If the application is stuck, the Python interpreter loop may not be able to run to process the signal. Use the faulthandler module (and its backport found on PyPI) for a C level signal handler that'll print the Python stack without requiring the interpreter loop to be responsive.
Jan
14
suggested approved edit on Showing the stack trace from a running Python application
Jan
14
answered How to force python's VM to print a stack trace?