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visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen Jul 24 at 18:30

Jul
3
comment Python program hangs forever when called from subprocess
gc.set_check_interval I believe. But given your updates I do not think you need to try fiddling with that anymore.
Jul
2
comment Python program hangs forever when called from subprocess
This type of behavior with seeming random innocuous changes "altering" behavior smells of a timing issue, possibly related to when GC collections are performed. What happens if you alter the GC check interval? From a slow 1 up to a high value and even disabled. Can you point me at the subprocess.POpen call in pip?
Apr
17
comment Is there a faster way (than this) to calculate the hash of a file (using hashlib) in Python?
My point is that the hash function "block_size" attribute is meaningless and shouldn't even be used for any purpose. Just pick an IO buffer size, don't attempt to base it off of block_size.
Apr
17
revised Android hashlib.sha 1
android question is really about java
Apr
17
suggested suggested edit on Android hashlib.sha 1
Apr
17
answered Android hashlib.sha 1
Apr
4
revised What are preferred cryptographic hashing functions in Python (preferably provided in hashlib)?
typo fixes.
Apr
4
comment Is there a faster way (than this) to calculate the hash of a file (using hashlib) in Python?
My point was that the block_size attribute of the hash functions is entirely useless. You should not write code that uses it. Modifying it will do nothing. The only thing that matters is modifying an I/O buffer size. That has nothing to do with the hash functions internal block size.
Apr
4
suggested suggested edit on What are preferred cryptographic hashing functions in Python (preferably provided in hashlib)?
Mar
30
comment Is there a faster way (than this) to calculate the hash of a file (using hashlib) in Python?
There is no point in using hashfunc.block_size at all, it's a meaningless value that only exists as part of the APIs for legacy reasons. Just loop reading whatever size is efficient to read from disk for the purposes of your code and pass it to the hash function. As long as you read more than ~64KiB at a time you are unlikely to notice any measurable difference.
Jan
22
awarded  Yearling
Jan
14
awarded  Excavator
Jan
14
revised Showing the stack trace from a running Python application
mention the backport
Jan
14
comment Showing the stack trace from a running Python application
If the application is stuck, the Python interpreter loop may not be able to run to process the signal. Use the faulthandler module (and its backport found on PyPI) for a C level signal handler that'll print the Python stack without requiring the interpreter loop to be responsive.
Jan
14
suggested suggested edit on Showing the stack trace from a running Python application
Jan
14
answered How to force python's VM to print a stack trace?
Dec
5
comment Error importing hashlib with python 2.7 but not with 2.6
run python2.7 -v -c "import hashlib" to see the list of what it is trying and failing to import. ldd /usr/local/lib/python2.7/_hashlibmodule.so tells you what?. i suspect it is failing to load that due to how your locally compiled python2.7 was linked...
Jul
19
comment Hashlib: optimal size of chunks to be used in md5.update()
The performance will asymptotically increase towards the maximum theoretical thruput of your system running the md5 code as your chunk size increases. By the time you're buffering 1MiB any increase in speed has long since become irrelevant. If you want to pick an arbitrary buffer size I suggest 128k. This is true of all hash functions.
Apr
23
comment Python 3.3 Slowing Down During Large Loop
Don't use a bare except: clause, list exactly what you want to catch to avid hiding bugs. My concern at first glance would be that your old = old+new line is copying and destroying larger and larger lists every loop iteration. Use old.extend(new) instead.
Apr
19
comment Python TypeError: range() integer end argument expected, got float
range is only going to yield integers anyways so just call int() on your parameters before passing them in.