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seen May 16 '13 at 21:09

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answered Yum identifies but does not install dependency
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asked Yum identifies but does not install dependency
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asked How do I make wget save 4xx response?
Mar
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comment What's the best/most RESTful way to simulate a procedure call over HTTP?
Just found a very poignant question that addresses (but does not answer) my question: stackoverflow.com/questions/9010724/rest-and-get-again - This seems to be the crux of my issue - why shouldn't we be able to supply complex/large data as part of a GET request?
Mar
15
asked What's the best/most RESTful way to simulate a procedure call over HTTP?
Mar
15
comment GET or PUT for a REST request
I don't think this is the correct definition of idempotency. It doesn't mean that an operation won't change the state of the server; it means that performing the operation n times is the same as performing it once (as described in your last paragraph). So, GET can legitimately alter the state of the system and still be idempotent, as long as subsequent GETs to the same URI don't cause further changes. Ditto for PUT and DELETE, but not for POST.
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Apr
20
comment SSL signed certificates for internal use
To elaborate further, this answer covers the role of the CA: stackoverflow.com/questions/188266/… "Your web browser comes installed with the public keys of all of the major certificate authorities. It uses this public key to verify that the web server's certificate was indeed signed by the trusted certificate authority." In other words, the use of a trusted CA does not mean that the certificate has not been stolen, forged or spoofed - only that it was originally issued by the entity that the server claims it was issued by.
Apr
20
comment SSL signed certificates for internal use
That was not my understanding of trusted authorities. But I am a beginner at this stuff! I thought that the idea was that having a cert from a trusted authority allows you to persuade the general public that you can be trusted. The key point (no pun intended) would be that a payed-for cert is no harder to generate than a self-signed one - it's simply that it comes from someone that everybody trusts. So it's like the difference between making an ID card yourself and getting one from the Government. You can make a unique, unforgeable one yourself, but you can't expect anyone else to accept it?
Apr
20
asked SSL signed certificates for internal use