Reputation
8,981
Top tag
Next privilege 10,000 Rep.
Access moderator tools
Badges
20 39
Newest
 Caucus
Impact
~390k people reached

Jul
20
comment awk, sed or vim regex
@sidyll: Because grouping is much easier to understand for someone who didn't know it before, and it more closely matches their original regex. Frankly, downvoting a working answer because you don't like the style is in pretty poor taste. You have a relevent point about escaping '.', the rest of that is just silly. (particularly for a one-shot vim regex)
Jun
15
comment how to trim file - remove the columns with the same value
I also did a bit of experimenting with cutting the columns, using the cut utility is orders of magnitude faster than doing the filtering in perl (even when you require multiple passes)
Jun
15
comment how to trim file - remove the columns with the same value
I wrote a quick sample file with 2M columns, starting out with the first few lines the same, and decreasing linearly until only 10% of the file matched. It seems to take about 1.3 seconds/line on my not terribly powerful desktop for the first few lines, quickly decreasing as the @linemap array shrinks.
Jun
15
comment Union hack for endian testing and byte swapping
Given the squabbling about perverse sizes of int on the other answer, I'd probably switch this over to using the uintX_t types.
May
24
comment How do I read first line using cat
I suppose it's silly to call out a 'useless use of cat' on a line specifically designed to use cat, isn't it.
Apr
13
comment how to extract version number form binary file using awk
Obviously other utilities are available to extract the end of the selected text, cut, awk, and sed come to mind, but grep can also be used.
Apr
12
comment What do people find difficult about C pointers?
I think the confusion about the fact that the use of & is consistent, and the inability to follow a chain of pointers (although I'll agree it's not terribly maintainable) points to a more fundamental misunderstanding than the syntax. Trying to explain why * vs & is as consistent as * vs / if your student can't tell what the operators do in isolation is silly... even if the students will tell you over and over that they just need to know if they should use * or &.
Apr
7
comment algorithm: find count of numbers within a given range
I might be wrong, but I think Jerry and I proposed basically the same strategy, if not quite the same tools. Duplicate numbers shouldn't be a problem under his scheme if rather than subtracting hash[lower] from hash[upper], you just subtract hash[lower-1] from hash[upper], assuming that you consistently listed the position of the value in the sorted array at the rightmost position.
Apr
7
comment algorithm: find count of numbers within a given range
To be pedantic, it doesn't cease to be O(1) if your list type doesn't fit in a regular int... it ceases to work entirely (as the memory required exceeds addressable space on many/most systems). This system can handle value counts that are any amount larger than an int, however. As there's no reason the generated count array can't use something more complex than a uint as a counter.
Mar
10
comment Python Four Digits Counter
Someone has been exposed to too much Java :)
Feb
22
comment Vim and Ctags tips and tricks
It does depend on your scenario, I need to use gotgenes suggestion on one of my machines because there are roughly 8,000 directories in /home, and that tends to be a bit sluggish.
Feb
2
comment Is there a good GUI Mercurial Client for Windows?
Turn off the overlays? I use TortoiseCVS,SVN and HG all on my work computers.
Jan
24
comment C to C++ : Transitioning from one language to the other
@Mike: The fact that you use MFC as an example of a non-overblown library is... confusing. Among C++ devotees... I think MFC is generally held up as the prime example of how to create an overly complex mess.
Jan
24
comment C to C++ : Transitioning from one language to the other
@par: You can ship perfectly viable commercial code from COBOL in 2011 too, doesn't mean you should. Saying 'it can work anyway' is not a good reason to persist in not taking advantage of a laguages features. Keep in mind, we're not talking about "Should I stick with my company's coding guidelines that forbid RTTI?"... we're talking about "How should I expand my knowledge of programming techniques?", the answer isn't "Pretend all those features don't exist", and that's why you're getting downvoted.
Jan
23
comment Python- Remove all words that contain other words in a list
@Paul Hankin: While replacing print with yield will indeed give you a generator for the list, you're wrong about moving the print statements. Try a trivial testcase.
Jan
22
comment Python- Remove all words that contain other words in a list
@steveha: In some ways, a trie is a nifty solution to this problem, since you can trim it as you load it, and you never have a word terminating on a non-leaf. This would probably be the way to go if you needed to access the list repeatedly after loading and setting it up. On the other hand, it's a ridiculous amount of code-overhead for a simple task, the above version takes less than a tenth of a second on that words file on my ancient laptop.
Jan
22
comment How to manage dependency when cloning repository?
Hmm... are you sure subrepos don't do what you want? One "project repo" named "repo", with three subrepos "workers", "tools" and "proj1"? I've used them for almost this exact purpose. (In my case, 'tools' was an svn repo controlled by another group)
Jan
22
comment Git, Hg or Bzr — Which to recommend to a new user?
This isn't exactly scientific... but I learned to use hg first, then git. I visited SO for hg questions perhaps 3 or 4 times... several dozen for git. With that said, I don't really doubt those numbers either.
Jan
22
comment Python- Remove all words that contain other words in a list
I tried to play around with filter on this, you need to use a filtering function that stores some outside state (the 'base', from my example above), which turns out to be rather odd-looking.
Jan
14
comment has Python 3 been widely adopted yet?
@nosklo: That's a rather remarkable bit of presumption on your part. For my (commercial) projects Python3 is actually significantly better than py2, and our very serious cost/benefit analysis caused us to move several months ago. And on your second comment... I'm answering the only literal question in the original question, provably factually. The answer someone actually needs to know about this is more along the lines of "Will the (library) functionality I need for an XYZ project be available in py3?" Just because it's gaining acceptance doesn't mean it will overtake py2.