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Jul
19
asked C# 2.0 generics: How to create an Action object with zero parameters
Jul
14
answered Winforms ToolStripSplitButton displays with a grey line under it, and is only raised on when the mouse hovers over it
Jul
13
awarded  Scholar
Jul
13
accepted Winforms: How to speed up Invalidate()?
Jul
13
asked Winforms ToolStripSplitButton displays with a grey line under it, and is only raised on when the mouse hovers over it
Jun
21
comment C# properties: How are they instantiated?
Well, likely or unlikely, I put the exact same content in a property and a function, and called both 100.000 times and measured both using StopWatch. Every single time the function came out about 5% quicker. Something is clearly going on although your point about the IL is valid if that is the case.
Jun
20
answered C# properties: How are they instantiated?
Jun
17
comment C# properties: How are they instantiated?
Are you sure about this? I read elsewhere that setting/getting properties is a lot slower than using methods.
Jun
17
comment C# properties: How are they instantiated?
The bulleted list, after the first code block: "The operation is orders of magnitude slower than a field set would be. If you are even considering providing an asynchronous version of an operation to avoid blocking the thread, it is very likely that the operation is too expensive to be a property."
Jun
17
comment C# properties: How are they instantiated?
No, it's basically a question wether to have a 250-line setter, or shell it out as a function. The property is used for setting the corners of a rectangular shape (which can be at an angle), so setting a corner will affect also the three other corners and the angle.
Jun
17
comment C# properties: How are they instantiated?
Then why does this page on MSDN msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms229054.aspx say that methods are much faster than property access?
Jun
17
asked C# properties: How are they instantiated?
Jun
11
comment Winforms: How to speed up Invalidate()?
Awesome, I'll check it out!
Jun
11
comment Winforms: How to speed up Invalidate()?
Coo, great answer! I managed to lower the CPU load in your example by changing the timer interval to 40 instead of 10 as well. Since 40ms equals 25fps, there is no need to update more than this, methinks. Animation is not really a part of the application, but the user experience relies on the user actually seeing what is being drawn :) I'd like to set your answer as the accepted answer, but it would also be interesting to see if other people have more experiences around this. This is after all a revolving topic.
Jun
11
awarded  Commentator
Jun
11
comment Winforms: How to speed up Invalidate()?
Thanks! Your techinques definitely speed the process up, albeit just a little. Nonetheless I'm not sure it's possible to improve the redraws too much witin the limitations of Windows Forms. Maybe your example is the best one can do without resorting to other technologies such as DX. On a different note, I have a theory why invalidation of smaller areas and adding them together won't work. Since all calls to Invalidate just put that area in a queue, maybe the form will calculate the bounding box of the total area and blit that area alltogether. That might be faster than amny small blits.
Jun
11
awarded  Supporter
Jun
11
comment Winforms: How to speed up Invalidate()?
Sure, and I can see what you're saying. You mean that I should Update() my control instead of invalidating, based on some fps scheme. This will probably strain the CPU even further though. Remember this is only an issue when I invalidate large portions of a HD screen. I was really looking for answers such as if this process could be successfully sped up by manual blitting or i.e. if painting on a GDI+ bmp and using DX to paint that image to a DX surface would make it quicker.
Jun
8
comment Winforms: How to speed up Invalidate()?
I already set the proper controlstyles of course. I have not tried handling the WM_ERASEBKGND message, but I have tested overriding OnPaintBackground with no visible gain in performance. At this point I'm wondering if blitting will improve my performance over the built-in double buffering and invalidation. I'm also gonna try slowing invalidations down to a maximum of 25fps, instead of today where they happen upon every mouse movement. A quick test revealed that you can get as many as 80 mousemove events generated per second if you move the mouse around a lot.
Jun
8
comment Winforms: How to speed up Invalidate()?
Well, I believe Delphi to be way faster for this kind of work in any case. Like Henk says, GDI+ is not known for speed at all, more likely lack thereof. However, the actual drawing code is not the bottleneck. The invalidation of the large area seems to be. I'm considering using my own backbuffer and manually blit the image to see if I can get a performance gain. Could you recomend any profiler in particular for VS2005?