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bio website streamsec.com
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visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen Dec 26 '14 at 9:43

StreamSec architect, lead developer and co-owner. I develop cryptographic primitives using Delphi.


Feb
8
awarded  Yearling
Sep
18
comment Derived IV for AES
@ownlstead: Indeed, in a Chosen Plain Text attack scenario where the attacker might force key reuse, it is at least not worse to use a cek and iv derived from the master key, than to use a constant iv.
Jun
13
comment AES256 Decryption with base64 decoding not working
Have you seen this: stackoverflow.com/questions/7408754/…
Apr
23
comment It is safe to process a callback method between dll compiled with packages and dll compiled without them (Delphi)?
@DavidHeffernan: On x86, as long as both compilers support the register calling convention, you can easily convert any method into a function by adding a Self parameter. On x64 this doesn't work if the method requires an implicit Result parameter, because the implicit Self parameter for methods is always passed in rcx, while the implicit Result parameter is passed in rdx for methods but in rcx for functions. You can't code around that by replacing it with a procedure either, because the result pointer is supposed to be returned in rax.
Apr
23
comment It is safe to process a callback method between dll compiled with packages and dll compiled without them (Delphi)?
@DavidHeffernan: Yes, in particular in 64 bit code, due to the peculiarities of the calling convention. In 32 code you could always interpret any method as a procedure with an extra Self argument. In some cases this won't work in 64 bit code, more precisely if the method is a function that returns anything that requires an implicit Result parameter (such as an interface, or any stack allocated type larger than 64 bits).
Apr
23
answered It is safe to process a callback method between dll compiled with packages and dll compiled without them (Delphi)?
Apr
17
comment How collision resistant are encryption algorithms?
@Ashwin: The mathematical requirement is that N'>CT, but the expected collision rate gets slightly skewed in such case. The condition I mentioned was just for the sake of argument.
Mar
19
answered Protecting hard-coded data that cannot be available to the user, such as a pass phrase
Mar
17
comment Would changing 1 byte in a file encrypted by AES CBC cause it to not be able to decrypt anymore?
@owlstead: Yes, there are probably not that many commonly used deterministic padding schemes that would result in a lower probability than 1 one 256.
Mar
17
comment Would changing 1 byte in a file encrypted by AES CBC cause it to not be able to decrypt anymore?
Even if the last block is changed, the probability is higher than one in 256 that it will decrypt to a depaddable block anyway.
Mar
17
comment Would my code really take 8 years or so to decipher
You might want to try crypto.stackexchange.com as well, in case you are interested in the algorithms and the scientific basis of their design.
Mar
16
comment How to declare a fixed value in a record?
What do you mean by "send data using this pattern"? Do you intend to use TStream.Write(Packet,SizeOf(Packet)) or similar? If not, why does it have to be a record?
Mar
12
comment Skipping / seeking to position with RC4 encryption
The important thing when using RC4 that way, is that you use a KDF, and not just pass the concatenation of the key and the salt/chunk id directly to the RC4 key schedule. There are known cipher text only attacks against the latter use of RC4.
Mar
9
comment How long should a salt be to make it infeasible to attempt dictionary attacks?
Another example of using "key stretching" as a synonym for key expansion: tools.ietf.org/html/draft-krovetz-umac-01. One more: gnu.org/software/gnu-crypto/manual/api/gnu/crypto/prng/…
Mar
9
comment How long should a salt be to make it infeasible to attempt dictionary attacks?
I think the (ab)use of the term "key stretching" for key strengthening dates back to an article from 2005 by Frances F. Yao and Yiqun Lisa Yin, where they discuss iterations as a method for "stretching" the entropy of a password. The use of "key stretching" as a synonym for key expansion can be found e.g. here rfc-editor.org/rfc/pdfrfc/rfc5931.txt.pdf
Mar
9
comment How long should a salt be to make it infeasible to attempt dictionary attacks?
Well, that doesn't make it correct and such usage is bound to incur confusion among readers not familiar with cryptography. Key strengthening is what you do when you specify a high iteration count. Key stretching is what you do when you want a derived key of a specific length. If you use a PBKDF to produce a 256 bit key for AES-256-CBC encryption, you have performed key stretching but not necessarily key strengthening. You don't necessarily get 256 bits of security just because the derived key is 256 bits.
Mar
9
comment Are there any published extensions to PKCS#12?
Many thanks for your efforts!
Mar
9
awarded  Scholar
Mar
9
accepted Are there any published extensions to PKCS#12?
Mar
9
comment Are there any published extensions to PKCS#12?
I think it is undetermined. The footnote says that appendix B applies only to the algorithms defined in PKCS#12, but on the other hand PKCS#5 doesn't say anything about how a password character string is converted into an octet string, and PKCS#12 B.1 is the only text that says anything about it.