Reputation
83,933
Next tag badge:
90/100 score
22/20 answers
Badges
12 95 165
Newest
 Nice Answer
Impact
~3.4m people reached

May
21
reviewed Approve Copy an entity in Google App Engine datastore in Python without knowing property names at 'compile' time
May
13
comment Downloading detailed logs from google app engine
@srinivas1729 No, the command line above allows you to download log messages from the app, not just HTTP logs.
May
7
awarded  Nice Answer
May
1
awarded  Guru
Apr
21
awarded  Good Answer
Apr
21
awarded  Custodian
Apr
21
reviewed Close Jquery — Action fires on any event
Apr
21
reviewed Close Obtain .NET PublicKeyToken from snk file?
Apr
18
comment Need a low collision hash function. Inputs are all a permutation of the same 72 bits
@Conrad The "permutation stream" may be infinite, but there's only a finite number of possible permutations. It's possible, in principle, to index them. Given you're always swapping in pairs of bits, you can think of your number as being in base 4. The number of permutations depends on how many of each symbol there is; obviously the trivial case where all the symbols are the same has 0 permutations.
Apr
18
comment Need a low collision hash function. Inputs are all a permutation of the same 72 bits
How many possible permutations are permitted? Could you simply store the index of the permutation, instead of hashing the result?
Apr
10
awarded  Good Answer
Mar
30
comment Why does taking the salted hash of the mod of a hash result in a very non-uniform distribution?
@Josh Yes, that will work - I'm so used to thinking of very large ranges that the obvious solution didn't occur to me for generating a permutation: Just generate one.
Mar
30
comment Why does taking the salted hash of the mod of a hash result in a very non-uniform distribution?
To answer your question under those constraints, though: What you need is an intermediate mixing step that is 1:1. For an example, see this blog post: blog.notdot.net/2007/9/… . Alternately, make your intermediate range much larger than your output range, so there's less unevenness in the mapping.
Mar
30
comment Why does taking the salted hash of the mod of a hash result in a very non-uniform distribution?
@Josh Why does the intermediate step need to reduce the number of possibilities? If your intermediate step doesn't do the modulo, you get good quality results.
Mar
30
answered Why does taking the salted hash of the mod of a hash result in a very non-uniform distribution?
Mar
30
comment Why does taking the salted hash of the mod of a hash result in a very non-uniform distribution?
You should edit your question to use that actual code - pastebins tend not to stick around. In any case, I ran your code with both randomly selected and sequential IDs, and in either case the results are well distributed, as one would expect.
Mar
30
comment Why does taking the salted hash of the mod of a hash result in a very non-uniform distribution?
Are you sure you're using SHA-256? 'hash' in many languages (such as Python) is an internal function that's not secure, and in fact not even stable across instances, and would likely behave as you describe. SHA-256 creates a byte array or encoded string, and I can't think of any language that would allow you to coerce it to an int like you have above.
Mar
18
awarded  algorithm
Mar
11
comment Implementing “Starts with” and “Ends with” queries with Google App Engine
@Jeremy That's valid with ndb, but not with db, which this answer was originally written for.
Mar
3
comment What is the most efficient way to encode an arbitrary GUID into readable ASCII (33-127)?
@v.oddou You can read about GUID schemes on Wikipedia; in a type 4 (random) UUID, all but a few bits are randomly selected.