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  • 5 votes cast
Nov
8
awarded  Critic
Nov
8
revised Calling an assignment operator for one of bases with vtables of multiple-inherited derived class in C++
Edit for guys who rather answer unrelevant, but easy stuff
Nov
8
comment Calling an assignment operator for one of bases with vtables of multiple-inherited derived class in C++
This is not my code, I'm usually avoiding inheritance at all, left aside multiple inheritance. I understand that there are other ways to do this without hacks, but question isn't about that. Question is about - is THAT way is safe or not. But thanks anyway, I was wondering if calling a fully qualified operator will do the same.
Nov
8
asked Calling an assignment operator for one of bases with vtables of multiple-inherited derived class in C++
Nov
8
accepted Transactionally write a file change on Windows
Nov
8
comment Transactionally write a file change on Windows
Well, ok, but what if someone else simply calls ReplaceFile without opening file for writing in prior? As ReplaceFile opens file with FILE_SHARE_WRITE sharing mode, it shouldn't prevent another ReplaceFile from slipping in. And what happens in that case? If A moves original file to a backup, then B should fail as there is no original file. May we assume that MoveFile in a ReplaceFile call is always atomic and only one of two simultaneous ReplaceFile calls may succeed?
Nov
8
comment Transactionally write a file change on Windows
@Radu, I'd say that the answer below is pretty damn close to one. Obviously, if you have only cooperating processes accessing a resource you may do the same thing better/cleaner/easier, but for the sake of robustness even in that case you should always assume that some non-cooperative process is also present. Like an antivirus, for instance.
Oct
18
comment Transactionally write a file change on Windows
And what happens if someone else tries to do the same trick (opens the file with FILE_SHARE_DELETE | FILE_SHARE_READ, check mtime, call ReplaceFile) at the same time? In my understanding, ReplaceFile = DeleteFile + CopyFile (ignoring a backup part). DeleteFile won't actually remove a file until all descriptors are closed. Until then you won't be able to open the file unless you also specify FILE_SHARED_DELETE. So why it won't just fail if you have an open descriptor (can't copy new to original)? And if it won't , what prevents a concurrent ReplaceFile call not to fail too?
Oct
18
comment Transactionally write a file change on Windows
Locking a file works only with cooperative processes - i.e. when a file could only be read or written by processed making same locks. In general case it's not much different from CreateFile sharing mode (on Windows) or not much use at all (on Unix).
Sep
15
awarded  Curious
Sep
12
comment A way to make a file contents snapshot in Linux
@MarkPlotnick that's what I call "non-programming" solution. You think about a tool. I think about a function. Performance is not an issue, but to a reasonable extent. Also, user resources are not unlimited either. Plus, btrfs is still experimental and not very common. Plus, if there is no btrfs you are screwed, because almost no other ordinary fs supports snapshots. Plus interface differs even between FS that do support this. In other words - there are too many things outside of c-library and kernel APIs to care about and only feasible if you are doing a very specific task.
Sep
12
comment Concurent state file manipulation with multiple process beyond our control for Linux and Windows
This is text saved from Transactionally write a file change on Windows. It's a pattern question - how to perform a particular (quite generic) trick using a bunch of clumsy mechanisms with no library or standard function doing it.
Sep
12
asked Concurent state file manipulation with multiple process beyond our control for Linux and Windows
Sep
12
answered Concurent state file manipulation with multiple process beyond our control for Linux and Windows
Sep
12
comment A way to make a file contents snapshot in Linux
@DavidC.Rankin 1. Linux has no mandatory locking (almost). In other words - if you are not calling flock you may just safely ignore it's existence. That what is called "non-cooperative" process - one that does not know, that he should make a flock call. Almost no Linux applications are using locks prior doing something. 2. Even if there would have been mandatory locking I would not recommend using it, as it may break other applications, throw cryptic messages in face of a user and bad stuff like that. That's a Windows way.
Sep
12
comment A way to make a file contents snapshot in Linux
@MarkPlotnick: programming solution is a solution that does not require a special filesystem configuration. Especially the one that does not involving creating a whole filesystem snapshot just for one file. That's kinda obvious.
Sep
12
comment A way to make a file contents snapshot in Linux
No, I don't have control upon all the involved processes. Processes should be considered non-cooperative.
Sep
11
comment A way to make a file contents snapshot in Linux
It's not exactly a programming solution
Sep
11
revised Transactionally write a file change on Windows
Reduce the question to the windows problem only, removing all the illustrative details.
Sep
11
asked A way to make a file contents snapshot in Linux