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awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
18
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Nov
18
revised How to verify if a vector has a value at a certain index
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Nov
18
comment How to verify if a vector has a value at a certain index
@NictraSavios: I just added a bit of explanation. Hopefully it's more clear now.
Nov
18
revised How to verify if a vector has a value at a certain index
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Nov
18
awarded  Commentator
Nov
18
comment How to verify if a vector has a value at a certain index
Note: the space/time complexity of the proposed algorithms aren't independent of dimensionality (that would be impossible). Rather, the space-efficient algorithms are linear in dimensionality. Of course the number of dimensions is probably small, so as long as the dependence isn't exponential it can probably be ignored.
Nov
18
awarded  Informed
Nov
18
comment How to verify if a vector has a value at a certain index
Oh, yes, that would have worked. Although, it wouldn't have caught the case where different-dimensioned coordinates were compared.
Nov
18
revised How to verify if a vector has a value at a certain index
added 168 characters in body
Nov
18
answered How to verify if a vector has a value at a certain index
Nov
17
comment Resizing an OpenGL texture shared with OpenCL (in OS X 10.9)
BTW, slide 36 of this presentation by an NVIDIA engineer doesn't include explicit synchronization between the glTexImage2D and clCreateFromGLTexture calls: sa09.idav.ucdavis.edu/docs/SA09_GL_interop.pdf
Nov
17
comment Resizing an OpenGL texture shared with OpenCL (in OS X 10.9)
In any case, I tried adding glFinish() and I get the same crashing behavior.
Nov
17
comment Resizing an OpenGL texture shared with OpenCL (in OS X 10.9)
I was under the impression that glTexImage2D takes effect immediately--for instance, when you pass in texture data you can deallocate it once glTexImage2D returns (though I suppose it could be buffered somewhere in system ram). I have glFinish() before my clEnqueueAcquireGLObjects calls, of course.
Nov
16
asked Resizing an OpenGL texture shared with OpenCL (in OS X 10.9)
Jul
6
comment Fast(er) algorithm for the Length of the Longest Common Subsequence (LCS)
I've been thinking about how you can use a BK tree to find nearest neighbors of a query (for Prim's algorithm) instead of all neighbors of some distance away. I'm not convinced a BK tree will give you a worthwhile reduction of comparisons, especially when you factor in the overhead of construction and maintenance (you'll need to remove words from the tree at each iteration of Prim's algorithm--you need to do this too for the trie approach, but that's trivial). There are a few other metric trees on Wikipedia (cover trees looked promising), but it's not immediately obvious how helpful they are.
Jul
6
comment Fast(er) algorithm for the Length of the Longest Common Subsequence (LCS)
But you would hope many of the strings have long prefixes in common, which will vastly reduce the size of the tree. Following the DFS-based algorithm I described, the complexity of computing LCS(A, B) for all B is O(nodes in trie * length(A)). So you can see how the trie footprint and the speedup are related: the time saved by reusing the table is O((total characters in dictionary - nodes in trie) * length(A)).
Jul
6
comment Fast(er) algorithm for the Length of the Longest Common Subsequence (LCS)
The space the trie occupies is very closely linked to how much of a speedup reusing the DP table gives you. In the (impossibly bad) worst case where no strings share prefixes, there will be a node per character in your dictionary. Each node needs to store 4 pointers/indices (for outbound A, C, T, and G edges) plus a flag specifying whether it is a word or not. So this could mean as much as (10^6*100 nodes) * ~16 bytes/node ~= 1.6gb.
Jul
2
comment Fast(er) algorithm for the Length of the Longest Common Subsequence (LCS)
Oh, okay, since you need all pairs' LCS lengths, I think you should try Yannick's suggestion of reusing the DP table when comparing one string, A, to all other strings, B. A good way to structure this is to build a trie dictionary and run a DFS for each A. Then, each time you descend down the trie (read a letter from B), you fill out a row of the table. Each time you backtrack you decrement your row index. Every time you hit a word node in the trie, you've computed an LCS for (A, B). This is equivalent to sorting the strings, but with cleaner code. NOTE: I'm now using the B index for rows.
Jul
2
comment Fast(er) algorithm for the Length of the Longest Common Subsequence (LCS)
@logic_max: that is a nice modification of the algorithm, but the copy on line 19 will undo any of the performance advantages of avoiding cache hits (which I imagine aren't too terrible for a ~40kb array anyway). You could avoid that copy by keeping two int pointers, L and L_old that you swap at each iteration.