78,043 reputation
1482151
bio website 127.0.0.1
location Frankfurt Am Main, Germany
age 26
visits member for 5 years, 3 months
seen 11 mins ago

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30m
comment Application.Exit(): Does it start a new thread (my program continues execution in parallel)?
Yes, exactly. If you have set Thread.IsBackground to true. But, this shutdown model is not recommended as it results in a rude abort using TAE. A cooperative shutdown model is better.
11h
comment if (ModelState.IsValid) is always false
Try changing all decimal fields to int just to see if the problem goes if away. If yes you know where to look.
11h
comment if (ModelState.IsValid) is always false
I once had a problem validating decimal in a non-english culture. Does your culture not use "." as the decimal separator like mine?
15h
comment Application.Exit(): Does it start a new thread (my program continues execution in parallel)?
Background threads are terminated when all foreground threads have terminated. The background thread property has nothing to do with UI frameworks. The two don't interact in any way.
19h
comment how to check for an empty file in C#
Read the file into a string first so that you can use this method. You need to examine the content not just the length.
20h
comment How to unbind a socket server in IIS
Yes, that's correct. Except that the linger option does nothing for listening sockets. Let me point out that most socket advice on the web is questionable. Hardly anyone understands sockets well. That's why they should only be used if no other option is available.
21h
comment Application.Exit(): Does it start a new thread (my program continues execution in parallel)?
Custom threads are not shut down when the UI shuts down. The UI doesn't know about them in any way.
1d
comment Application.Exit(): Does it start a new thread (my program continues execution in parallel)?
If PRINT is in the click handler it will run as you said. If it is on a custom thread, why would it not run? Can you detail any scenario in which it would not run?
1d
comment Application.Exit(): Does it start a new thread (my program continues execution in parallel)?
@Magnus "should"? Does that mean "I think it does not" or "I want it to be so"? Cancellation is cooperative in .NET. You must arrange yourself for your own threads to end. Exit just signals the loop to end at its convenience later. (Don't apologize, you're getting this. I only invest that much commentary into worthy learners.)
1d
comment Application.Exit(): Does it start a new thread (my program continues execution in parallel)?
@Magnus you have some ideas about how this works that are magic. I'll simplify a bit: The UI thread is essentially: while(true) { ExecuteMessage(GetMessage()); }. All it does is call your click handler. At this point the UI framework is no longer in the game. Your code runs and does whatever it wants. The UI framework does not need to know what you're doing. It couldn't care less about the call tree. Explain, why it would need to care. It also does not track spawned threads (and there is no facility in .NET to even do that). The message loop has nothing to do with inter-process communication
1d
comment Application.Exit(): Does it start a new thread (my program continues execution in parallel)?
@Magnus every method running on the UI thread is being called (indirectly) from the message loop. Once the loop stops nothing runs on the UI thread anymore and App.Run returns.
1d
comment How to unbind a socket server in IIS
Close is that method. As I said, multiple worker processes can exist at the same time. Try retrying for a few seconds hoping that the old worker is shut down by then. You are working against the system here. You're not supposed to host things in IIS of which there can only be at most one instance at the same time. You surely can make it work but expect trouble. Also, try not to use sockets at all.
1d
comment SQL Server - Reads vs writes in complex stored procedure
Reads and writes do not mean much. An uncached IO is 1000 times more expensive than a cached one. These might all be in-memory IOs which are really just computations. The CPU time already accounts for that.
1d
comment Application.Exit(): Does it start a new thread (my program continues execution in parallel)?
@ScottChamberlain I think you know this but to clarify: App.Exit makes App.Run return. It never kills the process. It does not even influence non-UI threads.
1d
comment Application.Exit(): Does it start a new thread (my program continues execution in parallel)?
The message pumps can only shut down (in a reasonable way) once all messages have been drained. It is not a good idea to just halt processing and leave all UI resource hanging unresponsively. Exit instructs all windows to close. None of this work happens on a new thread. The shutdown request is just being registered and then executed cooperatively.
1d
comment Confuse about the name of EventWaitHandle
It is a handle to an event. Multiple handles can exist to the same event.
2d
comment WinForms UI : Using async / await and ADO.NET
@StephenCleary why not? This is non-concurrent usage of all objects involved.
2d
comment WinForms UI : Using async / await and ADO.NET
Pause the debugger during the freeze. What's running?
2d
comment WinForms UI : Using async / await and ADO.NET
The message indicates that the result has been computed. Are you sure this takes 5s?
2d
comment How to stop exposing multiple endpoint at client side
Good questions, but too many. Delete this and ask them separately in a coherent way.