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10h
comment How to keep a TCP Socket alive and detect a disconnect?
This has been covered 100 times. I'm sure a search engine will answer all of this.
13h
comment Cancelling a long “string” of Task continuations properly? Forcing Task execution order and thread usage?
The code is basically complete. I assume there is some "event" that makes you want to start the sequence. At that time you call RunProcessing. I assume there is some event that makes you want to stop. Put that condition instead of the true.
13h
comment Cancelling a long “string” of Task continuations properly? Forcing Task execution order and thread usage?
Yes, it's best practice to only have hot tasks that are running. The await loop serializes all those tasks. Do you see why?
13h
comment Cancelling a long “string” of Task continuations properly? Forcing Task execution order and thread usage?
Added Task.Run code. Now, there is no need to the dreaded Task.ctor and Task.Start anymore.
13h
comment Cancelling a long “string” of Task continuations properly? Forcing Task execution order and thread usage?
But DoProcessing is not async. No async IO here.
13h
comment Cancelling a long “string” of Task continuations properly? Forcing Task execution order and thread usage?
Yeah, the task ctor and Start() are anti-patterns. I was about to write that. There is no need for that. Use Task.Run. Here, I do not see why you are using the thread-pool at all and why use continuations at all? You do not have async IO since DoProcessing is synchronous. You could run all of this in a single synchronous method I believe.
14h
comment Cancelling a long “string” of Task continuations properly? Forcing Task execution order and thread usage?
Can you use await? Normally, all chains of tasks should be expressed as an async method. This makes all of this easy.
18h
comment Does task switching in concurrent code result in faster code than synchronous execution?
The advantage of async IO is thread it is thread-less. That saves memory and OS resources. It's the only way to solve, for instance, the C10M problem.
19h
comment MemoryMappedFile causes next File.Open to take long time
You can try to run PerfView to profile the machine during the delays. The CPU stacks view might show who is on the stack. Maybe you'll find AV there. You need to look at the System process and at your own.
19h
comment MemoryMappedFile causes next File.Open to take long time
Is this all code? Are you not writing anything? Capture a procmon.exe trace of these operations. There's a duration column. Let's see what exactly takes so much time.
21h
comment Wrapping call to iterator in try/catch when using yield
Then, do what the last paragraph says: Expand the foreach into a manually written loop. You can then call MoveNext() with a catch guard and yield without catch.
21h
comment C# Call Generic method from Generic method
Shouldn't there be a compiler error? This error should be posted here and it also, I think, tells you what is wrong.
22h
comment How to detect overflow (or underflow) in Increment.Add
That code looks weird and broken. This should be better: software.intel.com/en-us/node/506125 In case you are interested: jfdube.wordpress.com/2011/11/30/understanding-atomic-operations
22h
comment How to detect overflow (or underflow) in Increment.Add
Unfortunately, it seems the question is moot because the time it takes to take a lock a few times is extremely low. If you want to continue to optimize this then Google for ".net CAS loop" or "CAS loop" in general.
22h
comment How can I use Parallel foreach for my requirement where I want to break list of 10k customers in to 4 batches and process each queue
And what did you try? What about simply dividing the list into 4 batches and then calling Parallel.ForEach?
1d
comment Cannot cast delegate to a generic type T
There are Eric Lippert posts on this topic. If you are interested in language design, C# in particular, read all of Erics blog.
1d
comment Overriding GetHashCode() C# Complex way or simple way?
Your question 4 is equivalent to "Why would a hash code ever matter?". For that you need to understand how hash tables work (Wikipedia).
1d
comment C# Server architecture/design which can stand high load
Is the web app stateless? Do you really need persistent connections? 100k concurrent requests or users? The latter is a meaningless metric from a capacity planning standpoint.
1d
comment Using specific IP's to send HTTP-webrequests
the above code is throwing SocketExceptions Post the full exception ToString. Witholding error information makes it hard to diagnose the error.
1d
comment StreamReader.ReadLine will hang in an infinite loop
I'm pondering whether to close this because there is a bug here that is not visible in this code. The code shown here must be a simplified version of the real code.