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Mar
5
awarded  Yearling
Dec
5
comment Error when pass “enum” in a function with variable arguments
@mafso: I think you are right! After some search I found this: "(...) [the] argument’s type must be self-promoting: that is, the default promotions must not change its type. (...) This is actually an ISO C requirement.". While this is about C, C++ is compatible with C variadic functions (it actually refers to the ISO C standard). So the difference here is that enum types in C can be self-promoting, but in C++ they never can. That's probably the reason g++ has a default warning and even aborts the program.
Jul
5
comment Error when pass “enum” in a function with variable arguments
@mafso I compiled on Win7x64, using TDM-GCC-64 4.8.1-3 (so it's basically gcc/g++ 4.8.1). Strangely, I didn't find anything relevant in the (Itanium C++) ABI, but the link you sent says: Normally, the [underlying] type [of an enum type] is unsigned int (...). and on my platform it indeed uses unsigned int. So the warning (which causes the program to abort) seems to completely ignore the actual enum type parameter of va_args (tested, even when enum uses (signed) int) - which is a good thing, because it is bad code. You'll probably get the warning using a newer gcc version, too.
Jul
4
comment Error when pass “enum” in a function with variable arguments
@KeplerBR The problem of enum types is that their underlying types are not clearly defined. It could be a char, a short, an unsigned short, etc. In certain situations, to be more precise, situations where the size of the type counts, it can be a hassle to use enum types. Basically everything that uses sizeof x, where x is/has an enumeration type is likely an error. va_args is an example of a macro which uses sizeof, and breaks because of the vagueness of enum types. Personally, I wouldn't discourage use of enum types, as long as it adds readability (but there is also typedef).
Jul
4
comment Error when pass “enum” in a function with variable arguments
@KeplerBR This is basically your answer: The book version is no well-defined C (it is platform dependent; only correct if your enum type is implemented with int type); It is also no well-defined C++ (C++ Working Draft N3242, §7.2 p.6 basically says the same as §6.7.2.2 p.4). I guess the reason the C++ compiler gives a warning while the C compiler doesn't is simply because the C compiler historically is far less complex - because that way, it can be maintained much easier. Such a warning could be seen as clutter and there are specific code analysis programs, so "it's not really needed".
Jul
4
comment Error when pass “enum” in a function with variable arguments
I believe you are right. Although enum constants are of type int, the enum type itself can, depending on the platform, be compatible only to char, therefore va_arg(ap, enum drink) would pull too few bytes. Therefore the book is wrong and you have to do something like (enum drink)va_arg(ap, int).
Jul
4
comment Error when pass “enum” in a function with variable arguments
Your answer is confusing me. When you talk about "his version", you mean the one where he uses va_arg(ap, int). By argument promotion the passed enum drink will be promoted to int, therefore this macro call will be correct. In the book version, va_arg(ap, enum drink) is used and §6.7.2.2 says that enum drink is compatible with int (which is the actual (promoted) type of the argument), therefore you cannot say that it is undefined behaviour.
Jul
4
comment Error when pass “enum” in a function with variable arguments
@mafso He compiled as C++, and g++ tells you the following: warning: 'drink' is promoted to 'int' when passed through '...' [enabled by default]| note: (so you should pass 'int' not 'drink' to 'va_arg')| note: if this code is reached, the program will abort| So it compiles, but the program 'gracefully crashes'.
Jul
4
comment Error when pass “enum” in a function with variable arguments
@KelperBR (I'm too slow to edit..) Also make sure you set up your compiler correctly: Settings -> Compiler... -> Toolchain executable -> C Compiler: This should be <whatever>gcc.exe (probably mingw32-gcc.exe), not <whatever>g++.exe.
Jul
4
comment Error when pass “enum” in a function with variable arguments
@KeplerBR In Codeblocks, check the properties of your .c file -> Advanced -> Compiler Variable. It should be "CC".
Jul
4
comment Error when pass “enum” in a function with variable arguments
This seems to be a discrepance between C and C++. Compiling as C worked perfectly, while compiling as C++ shows your warning. Make sure you are compiling as C (by making sure the file has a .c extension). Can somebody find a source in the standard for this, or is it really a compiler problem?
Mar
5
awarded  Yearling
Mar
5
awarded  Yearling
Dec
14
awarded  Student
Apr
30
answered semantical reasons for pass-by-reference
Apr
29
comment copy character from string to another string in C
I don't think he intended to copy bbCC into color2, he probably only wanted bb (as he implies in his first sentence).
Apr
29
comment copy character from string to another string in C
If you just want to skip 2 chars, why don't you simply do something like strncpy(color2, string+2, 2); color2[2] = '\0' etc?
Apr
29
comment what if % is not followed by a suitable character in printf's format string?
@MrLister: Ah, never seen that one - doesn't look too bad. The C standard has (as far as I can tell) its own notation, which is similar to BNF, but a bit more intuitive - you'll get it, if you read it.
Apr
29
comment what if % is not followed by a suitable character in printf's format string?
@MrLister: Sorry, but what does BNF stand for?
Apr
29
comment what if % is not followed by a suitable character in printf's format string?
@MrLister: It's not a "manual", it's the formal definition of the language; therefore it is hard to read, but if you want to have a look, look at the open-std website or this direct link to n1256.pdf